WW2 Military Hospitals Pacific Theater of Operations and Minor Theaters

36th Evacuation Hospital, at Palo, Leyte, Philippines, October 44. The 36th Evac Hosp (supporting X Army Corps) was set up in the San Salvador Cathedral. It served, together with the 58th Evac Hosp, in the Leyte and Luzon Campaigns.

The article lists major Military Hospitals active during the Asia-Pacific War which were part of the following Theater Commands such as: United States Army Forces China, Burma, India (USAFCBI), United States Army Forces, China Theater (USAFCT), United States Army Forces in the Far East (USAFFE), United States Army Forces in Australia (USAFIA), United States Army Forces, India-Burma Theater (USAFIBT), United States Army Forces in the Central Pacific Area (USAFICPA), United States Army Forces in the Philippines (USAFIP), United States Army Forces in the Philippines, Northern Luzon (USAFIP-NL), United States Army Forces in the South Pacific Area (USAFISPA), United States Army Forces, Middle Pacific (USAFMIDPAC), United States Army Forces, Pacific (USAFPAC), United States Army Forces, Pacific Ocean Areas (USAFPOA), and United States Army Forces, Western Pacific (USAFWESPAC).

Background Information:

Every combat Theater of WW2 had its unique medical history, but nowhere did disease pose a greater threat to the American G.I. and to military operations than in the bitter war against Japan!
US Armed Forces faced the dual challenges of fighting and supporting its troops in primitive, largely tropical environments, burdened by severe logistical problems. Previous conflicts, such as the Spanish-American War, and World War 1 had complicated the situation, as it conferred upon the United States many Pacific islands and overseas territories (Philippines, Guam), while the Japanese acquired former German possessions.

As War erupted in Europe, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed a state of National Emergency in September 1939, and in August 1940, Congress summoned the National Guard into Federal service and called-up the Reserves! As the United States Army reorganized and professionalized, the Army Medical Department began to plan and then to mobilize for war too, spending many months feverishly making preparations that had been delayed too long…

General view of the 18th General Hospital, in New Zealand in 1942. It was only briefly stationed there, taking over hospital care from the Navy, before being transferred to Fiji. In Oct 42, work began for the construction of a brand-new 1000-bed General Hospital (39th Gen Hosp) which would remain the only permanent US Army Hospital in New Zealand (Feb 43 – Oct 44).

For many years, the principal Army unit had been the Hawaiian Division, and this force then represented the largest contingent stationed outside the continental United States. The first medical build-up was essentially based on expanding medical facilities and depots, constructing new hospitals, and revising medical contingency plans. The next project called for a more elaborate defense of the Commonwealth of the Philippines, under a new command; the United States Army Forces in the Far East (USAFFE) under Lt. General Douglas MacArthur.
The war against Japan was fought in an immense area that covered roughly 1/3 of the earth’s surface! Although most of the decisive battles took place on the islands in the Pacific, inevitably bringing American Forces closer the Japanese mainland; fighting also occurred on mainland Asia. Distances were enormous, and everything could only be moved by sea or air – climates varied as well as landforms and included cold wind-swept Aleutians, jungle-clad Melanesian islands, palm-fringed Micronesia atolls, damp and tropical heat, volcanic islands, complex landmasses, steep mountain ranges, wooded high plateaus, rain forests, dense jungles – environmental  conditions brought its own characteristic medical consequences involving frostbite, trenchfoot, malaria, fever, and jungle rot … All those elements had to be taken into account by the Medical Department, although none of the diseases were normally fatal, they could nevertheless put soldiers out of action as effectively as combat casualties.

Partial view of medics taking care of casualties at the 11th Portable Surgical Hospital, somewhere in the jungles of New Guinea, picture taken July 44. Normally only a 25-bed facility, the 11th expanded to 50, even admitting 102 patients during 17-27 Jun 44, performing 87 operations with only 1 death! Surgeons and staff worked continuously for 72 hours. The Portable Surgical Hospitals provided skilled surgical care in rugged jungle environment and could be set up and moved within a relative short time; patients and medical facilities were usually kept under canvas or temporary huts.

The Beginning:

After the attack against Pearl Harbor, and the fall of the Philippines, Australia would emerge as the ‘great’ Allied base in 1942, playing a role in the Pacific War like that of Great Britain in western Europe. Of course, we should not forget, that in December 1941, Britain and America had agreed to concentrate their combined forces against Germany FIRST!
In order to simplify wartime operations, the Anglo-American Combined Chiefs of Staff on 24 March 1942,  assigned the United States ‘responsibility’ for the conduct of the war in the Pacific! The region was divided into 2 separate Commands – on 18 April 1942, Lt. General Douglas MacArthur became Supreme Commander, Southwest Pacific Area (SWPA) covering the Philippines, Australia, the Netherlands East Indies, and New Guinea – on 8 May 1942, Admiral Chester W. Nimitz was named Commander Pacific Ocean Areas (CINCPAC) including the vast region stretching from the Bering Straits to Antartica, including the Hawaiian Islands and Japan itself. The Command was further subdivided into 3 main sectors; the North Pacific Area (e.g. Aleutians), the Central Pacific Area (e.g. Hawaiian, Mariana, Marshall, Palau, Caroline, and Marshall Islands) and the South Pacific Area (e.g. Solomon and Gilbert Islands). Primary instructions were to contain Japan’s southward advance, to hold Australia, to keep key islands of the South Pacific as bases for future operations, and to protect and defend lines of communications with the United States…

World War 2:

Until the very last months of the fighting, the US Medical Department faced immense obstacles – supply lines were tenuous and environmental conditions almost intolerable, malaria epidemics broke out, logistical difficulties beset medical planners, diseases took their toll, medical support often broke down, amphibious medical evacuation had to be revised, and yet altogether death rates from disease were only slightly over 1 / 1000 troops / per year!
New methods of preventive medicine were created, logistics were improved, and recent discoveries were now provided on a large scale, such as Penicillin – Atabrine – and DDT. The ultimate lesson may however lie in the flexibility of spirit and organization shown by medical personnel, who were able to save lives and improve general health conditions during those years of bitter and unrelenting struggle for peace – in those harsh times the Medical Department successfully maintained the ‘fighting strength of the Army’.

Port Dispensary Tent on Biak Island, New Guinea, Aug 44. The large US Base (Base “H”) opened on Biak in Aug 44 under Col. August W. Splitter, MC. The 28th Hosp Cen operating on the island included 3 Gen Hosp and 1 Sta Hosp. From end Nov 44, evacuation took place by air, and C-54 aircraft carried patients directly to the ZI, via Guadalcanal, Canton Is., and Honolulu.

Evacuation Hospitals

1st EVAC HOSP – 4 Mar 42 Australia (activated 1 Aug 40)
7th EVAC HOSP – 7 Apr 42 Tongatabu – Fiji – Guadalcanal – 9 Jan 45 Luzon (constituted with elements of 19th EVAC HOSP)
10th EVAC HOSP – 4 Mar 42 Australia – Dec 42 New Guinea (activated 10 Feb 41)
14th EVAC HOSP – 10 Jul 43 India – 12 Dec 43 Burma (constituted with elements of 43d EVAC Hosp)
21st EVAC HOSP – 23 Sep 43 New Caledonia – 6 Dec 43 Guadalcanal – 15 Feb 44 Bougainville – 11 Jan 45 Luzon – 7 Feb 45 Manila (constituted with elements of 53d EVAC HOSP)
25th EVAC HOSP – 19 Oct 42 New Zealand – Nov 42 Espiritu Santo (constituted with elements of 23d EVAC HOSP)
29th EVAC HOSP – 15 Dec 43 New Britain (bombed on 16 Dec 43) – 15 Aug 44 Noemfoor Is – 13 Jan 45 Luzon – 7 Feb 45 Manila
30th EVAC HOSP – 14 Oct 43 New Guinea – 2 Feb 44 New Britain – 2 Jul 44 New Guinea – 27 May 45 Philippines – 17 Dec 45 Japan (activated 15 Jul 42) (inactivated 31 Jan 46 Japan)
48th EVAC HOSP – 18 Jan 43 India – Dec 43 Burma (constituted with elements of 4th EVAC HOSP)
52d EVAC HOSP – 23 Jan 42 New Caledonia – 28 Feb 42 Australia – 21 Mar 42 New Caledonia (constituted with elements of 23d EVAC HOSP)
54th EVAC HOSP – 31 Jul 43 Australia – Sep 43 New Guinea – 13 Jan 45 Luzon – 9 Feb 45 Manila (activated 2 Jun 41, converted from 750 to 400-bed Hosp before being sent overseas)
56th EVAC HOSP – 19 Feb 44 New Guinea – 26 Oct 44 Leyte  (ex-36th EVAC HOSP, activated 1 Jun 41, converted from 750 to 400-bed Hosp before being sent overseas)
58th EVAC HOSP – Jun 43 Admiralty Is – 26 Oct 44 Leyte
71st EVAC HOSP – 7 Feb 45 Manila
73d EVAC HOSP – 20 Jan 43 India – Dec 43 Burma (constituted with elements of 53d EVAC Hosp)
86th EVAC HOSP – 44-45 Asiatic-Pacific Theater (activated 20 Mar 44) (inactivated 28 Feb 46 in Japan)
92d EVAC HOSP – 28 Jun 43 Australia – 1 Apr 44 Papua-New Guinea – 13 Jan 45 Philippines – 27 Oct 45 Japan (activated 25 Aug 42, ex-7th SURG HOSP, activated 1 Aug 40) (inactivated Feb 46 in Japan)
99th EVAC HOSP – 16 Jul 44 Dutch New Guinea – 30 Sep 44 Netherlands East Indies – 27 Apr 45 Philippines – 30 Sep 45 Japan (activated 14 Aug 42, ex-11th SURG HOSP, activated 5 Aug 42) (inactivated in Japan 28 Feb 46)
361st EVAC HOSP – 28 Oct 43 Australia (activated 28 Oct 43, ex-33d SURG HOSP)

Upper Respiratory Ward, 147th General Hospital, on Oahu, Hawaii. The 147th arrived from the ZI in June 42 and took over the installations of the Provisional General Hospital No. 2 (St. Louis College), about 5 miles east of downtown Honolulu. During 1944, a special section for diseases of the chest was set up, meanwhile the Hospital (together with the 22d Sta Hosp and the 218th Gen Hosp) continued to receive the overflow of medical cases from the forward bases in the area.

Field Hospitals

1st FLD HOSP – Papua-New Guinea – 20 Oct 44 Leyte
2d FLD HOSP – Australia – 24 Nov 42 Papua-New Guinea – 20 Oct 44 Leyte
3d FLD HOSP – Nov-Dec 42 Guadalcanal – Jan 43 New Guinea – Oct 44 Leyte – Jan 45 Luzon
4th Provisional FLD HOSP – Dec 43 China
5th FLD HOSP – 44 Papua-New Guinea – 9 Jan 45 Luzon – 15 Feb 45 Manila
6th FLD HOSP – 15 Aug 43 Aleutians
14th FLD HOSP – 11 May 43 Aleutians
17th FLD HOSP – Jun 43 Russell Is – 28 Jul 43 New Georgia
20th FLD HOSP – 11 May 43 Aleutian Is. – 45 Holland – 45 Belgium – 45 Germany
22d FLD HOSP – 45 China
23d FLD HOSP – Jun 43 New Guinea – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
24th FLD HOSP – 6 Jul 43 New Caledonia – 31 Jul 43 Guadalcanal – 7 Sep 43 New Georgia – 8 Feb 44 Guadalcanal – 1 Apr 44 Emirau Is. – 11 Jan 45 Luzon – 17 Sep 45 Honshu (Japan) (activated 19 Aug 42, inactivated 15 Dec 45)
25th FLD HOSP – late 43 Burma – May 45 Burma
27th FLD HOSP – 27 Oct 44 China
28th FLD HOSP – 22 Aug 43 Aleutians
29th FLD HOSP – 22 Aug 43 Aleutians
30th FLD HOSP – 15 Aug 43 Aleutians
31st FLD HOSP – 20 Jun 44 Saipan Is – Apr 45 Okinawa
34th FLD HOSP – Philippines (transferred from ABC, 22 Jul 45)
36th FLD HOSP – 25 Jul 44 Guam
37th FLD HOSP – 43 New Guinea – 9 Jan 45 Luzon
38th FLD HOSP – 20 Jun 44 Saipan Is – 26 Feb 45 Okinawa
41st FLD HOSP – 9 Jan 45 Luzon – 15 Feb 45 Manila
43d FLD HOSP – 9 Jan 45 Luzon
44th FLD HOSP – 3 May 45 Burma
52d FLD HOSP – Guadalcanal – Jun 43 Bougainville
69th FLD HOSP – 26 Oct 44 Leyte – Dec 44 Leyte – 7 Apr 45 Okinawa
70th FLD HOSP – 44 Burma
71st FLD HOSP – 44 India
72d FLD HOSP – 44 India – China
73d FLD HOSP – Feb 45 Philippines – Japan
74th FLD HOSP – Apr 45 Okinawa
76th FLD HOSP – Apr 45 Okinawa
82d FLD HOSP – Apr 45 Okinawa
88th FLD HOSP – Sep 45 Okinawa (dedicated to treatment of Japanese PWs)
91st FLD HOSP – 15 Jun 45 Philippines
92d FLD HOSP – 15 Jun 45 Luzon (activated 30 Oct 44) (inactivated 28 Feb 46 in Japan)
455th FLD HOSP

View of one of the early Hospitals, located at the Advance Base, Port Moresby, Papua, Aug 42. As military operations in the region increased, basic medical facilities expanded, and by end of 42, new installations including General Hospitals, Field Hospitals, Portable Surgical Hospitals, and a Medical Supply Depot were built.

General Hospitals

1st GEN HOSP – 23 Dec 41 Philippines (also designated General Hospital No. 1)
2d GEN HOSP – 5 Jan 42 Philippines (also designated General Hospital No. 2)
4th GEN HOSP – 23 Jan 42 Australia (ex-56th GEN HOSP, activated 1 Feb 41, supplied cadres for other units, 12 Oct 43)
8th GEN HOSP – 27 Nov 42 New Caledonia
9th GEN HOSP – 31 Jul 43 Guadalcanal – 45 Papua-New Guinea (activated 15 Jul 42)
13th GEN HOSP – 5 Jan 44 New Guinea (activated 15 Jan 43)
18th GEN HOSP – 12 Jun 42 N. Zealand – 3 Oct 42 Fiji Islands – Sep 44 Ledo Road (India) – 12 Mar 45 Myitkyina, (Burma) (activated 20 Apr 42) (closed 5 Oct 45) (return to ZI 24 Nov 45)
18th GEN HOSP – 26 May 42 New Zealand – 45 Burma (ex-222d GEN HOSP, activated 16 Jun 41, supplied cadres for other units, 1 Apr 44, redesignated 134th GEN HOSP)
20th GEN HOSP – 19 Jan 43 India – Dec 43 Burma (activated 15 May 42)
27th GEN HOSP – 5 Jan 44 Australia (activated 15 Jul 42)
29th GEN HOSP – 3 Nov 44 New Caledonia (activated 1 Sep 42)
31st GEN HOSP – 18 Oct 43 Espiritu Santo (activated 1 Jun 43)
35th GEN HOSP – 44 New Guinea – 45 Luzon (activated 21 Mar 43) (inactivated 10 Dec 45 in the Philippines)
39th GEN HOSP – 3 Nov 42 New Zealand – 1 Jan 45 New Caledonia – Jan 45 Saipan (activated 15 Jul 42)
42d GEN HOSP – 19 May 42 Australia (ex-215th GEN HOSP, activated 16 May 41, supplied cadres for other units, 15 Apr 43, disbanded 11 Nov 44)
44th GEN HOSP – 25 Sep 43 Australia (activated 15 Jan 43)
47th GEN HOSP – 11 Jan 44 New Guinea – Burma (activated 10 Jun 43)
49th GEN HOSP – 1 Mar 45 Philippines
51st GEN HOSP – 1 Apr 44 New Guinea
53d GEN HOSP – ETO Sep-Oct 45 embarked for the South Pacific (activated 10 Feb 41, also supplied cadres for other units)
54th GEN HOSP – 30 Jun 44 New Guinea
60th GEN HOSP – 18 Jul 44 New Guinea – 2 Apr 45 Philippines (activated 25 May 43 in the ZI, return to ZI 13 Nov 45)
63d GEN HOSP – (activated 10 Feb 41, supplied cadres for other units, 15 Jan 43)
69th GEN HOSP – 45 Burma
71st GEN HOSP – 5 Jan 44 Australia (activated 10 Jun 43, supplied cadres for other units, 24 Jun 43)
105th GEN HOSP – 19 May 42 Australia (ex-203d GEN HOSP, activated 10 Feb 41, supplied cadres for other units, 29 Dec 43)
118th GEN HOSP – 19 May 42 Australia – 44 Philippines (activated 21 Apr 42)
133d GEN HOSP – 25 Nov 44 Leyte
142d GEN HOSP – 26 May 42 New Zealand – 43 Fiji – Nov 44 India (ex-217th GEN HOSP, activated 1 Jun 41, supplied cadres for other units, 28 Feb 44) (new 142d GEN HOSP activated 20 Apr 42)
147th GEN HOSP – 16 Jun 42 Hawaii – 19 Nov 43 Gilberts – 1 Aug 44 Hawaii (activated 1 May 41)
148th GEN HOSP – 21 Mar 42 Hawaii – 31 May 44 Saipan Is (activated 10 Feb 41)
172d GEN HOSP – 44 India – Burma – 45 China (activated 29 Jul 44) (inactivated 30 Apr 46 in China)
181st GEN HOSP – 43 India
204th GEN HOSP – 8 Apr 42 Hawaii – 28 Dec 44 Guam (activated 10 Feb 41)
204th GEN HOSP – 8 Apr 42 Hawaii (activated 10 Feb 41)
218th GEN HOSP – 8 Jan 42 Panama – 1 Aug 44 Hawaii (activated 6 Jun 41)
232d GEN HOSP – 27 Feb 45 Iwo Jima – Mar 45 Saipan
234th GEN HOSP
247th GEN HOSP – 45 Philippines (activated 15 Oct 44, ex-233d STA HOSP)
263d GEN HOSP – 43 India
307th GEN HOSP

Sternberg GEN HOSP – Philippines
Tripler GEN HOSP – Hawaii
GEN HOSP No. 1 – Limay, Philippines
GEN HOSP No. 2 – Cabcaben, Philippines
Malinta Tunnel GEN HOSP – Corregidor, Philippines

US Army Nurse mounts a mosquito net on one of the beds at an Army Hospital, either located in Melbourne or in Brisbane, Australia. Picture taken in spring of 42. Due to the steady growth of Allied Forces, the Australian continent was subdivided into 7 Base Sections: Base Sec 1 (Northern Territory – Hq Darwin), Base Sec 2 (Queensland – Hq Townsville), Base Sec 3 (Hq Brisbane), Base Sec 4 (Victoria – Hq Melbourne), Base Sec 5 (South Australia – Hq Adelaide), Base Sec 6 (Western Australia – Hq Perth), and Base Sec 7 (New South Wales – Hq Sydney).

Station Hospitals

1st STA HOSP – 10 Feb 42 Christmas Is (activated 10 Feb 41)
2d STA HOSP – 18 May 42 Australia (activated 16 Mar 42)
5th STA HOSP – 17 Feb 42 Australia (activated 7 Jan 41)
8th STA HOSP – 17 Jan 42 Bora Bora (activated 10 Feb 41)
9th STA HOSP – 23 Jan 42 Australia – 27 Mar 42 New Caledonia – Guadalcanal (activated 11 Feb 41)
12th STA HOSP – 18 Feb 42 Australia (activated 10 Feb 41, functioned as an Evac Hosp)
13th STA HOSP – 18 May 42 Australia (activated 16 Mar 42)
17th STA HOSP – 18 May 42 Australia – New Guinea (activated 16 Mar 42)
18th STA HOSP – 18 May 42 Australia  – New Guinea (activated 16 Mar 42)
20th STA HOSP – 16 Jan 43 Guadalcanal
22d STA HOSP – 27 Feb 42 Hawaii (activated 10 Feb 41)
26th STA HOSP – 31 Jan 42 Canton Is (activated 10 Feb 41)
27th STA HOSP – 27 Nov 42 New Caledonia -13 May 45 Okinawa (operated 500-bed STA HOSP to service US Army Garrison)
30th STA HOSP – 43 India
31st STA HOSP – 30 Nov 42 New Caledonia
47th STA HOSP – 18 Feb 42 Australia – 44 Papua-New Guinea (activated 18 Jun 41)
48th STA HOSP – 10 Nov 42 New Caledonia – 14 Jan 43 New Hebrides – 24 Dec 43 New Zealand – 28 May 44 Guadalcanal – 26 Mar 45 Tinian
65th STA HOSP – 44 Australia
71st STA HOSP – 9 May 42 Fiji (activated 14 Apr 42)
76th STA HOSP – 26 Oct 44 Leyte
82d STA HOSP – 44 Papua-New Guinea
94th STA HOSP – 8 Mar 44 Bombay (India)
95th STA HOSP – 27 May 42 India – Oct 43 China (activated 30 Apr 42)
97th STA HOSP – 27 May 42 India (activated 28 Apr 42)
98th STA HOSP – 27 May 42 India – Burma (activated 28 Apr 42)
99th STA HOSP – 27 May 42 India (activated 28 Apr 42)
100th STA HOSP – 27 May 42 India (activated 1 May 42)
106th STA HOSP – 26 July 45 Okinawa (served in the MTO from 2 Sep 43 until 29 Jun 45)
109th STA HOSP – 23 Jan 42 New Caledonia (activated 1 Jun 41)
111th STA HOSP – Dec 43 India
112th STA HOSP – Dec 43 India
116th STA HOSP – 44 Papua-New Guinea – 45 Philippines
128th STA HOSP –23 Mar 44 New Guinea – 13 Aug 45 Philippines – 26 Sep 45 Japan (activated 20 Dec 42, FIRST Army Hospital established in Japan,  redesignated 8168th Army Unit Oct 53 in Japan)
137th STA HOSP – Jun 44 Guadalcanal  
153d STA HOSP – 18 Feb 42 Australia – Oct 42 Papua – 9 Mar 43 Australia (activated 1 Jun 41)
155th STA HOSP – 31 May 42 New Zealand (stop over) – 7 Jun 42 Australia – 19 Sep 44 New Guinea – 30 Sep 44 Morotai Island – 1 Jan 46 Philippines – 46 Japan (activated 15 May 41)
156th STA HOSP – 11 Mar 42 Hawaii (activated 3 Jun 41)
159th STA HOSP – 19 Mar 42 India (activated 1 Jun 41)
165th STA HOSP – 27 Feb 42 Hawaii – 26 Oct 44 Leyte (activated 1 Jun 41)
166th STA HOSP – 19 May 42 Australia (activated 1 Jun 41)
171st STA HOSP – 18 May 42 Australia – Dec 42 Papua (activated 3 Apr 42)
172d STA HOSP – 19 May 42 Australia (activated 20 Mar 42)
174th STA HOSP – 18 May 42 Australia (activated 29 Mar 42)
176th STA HOSP – 31 May 44 Saipan Is
178th STA HOSP
179th STA HOSP – May 42 Aleutians
198th STA HOSP
227th STA HOSP – 26 Feb 45 Philippines
233d STA HOSP – 5 Jan 44 Australia (ex-71st GEN HOSP, used to staff 233d + 237th STA HOSP, redesignated 247th GEN HOSP 15 Oct 44)
237th STA HOSP – 5 Jan 44 Australia – 45 Papua-New Guinea (ex-71st GEN HOSP)
251st STA HOSP – 15 Aug 44 Papua-New Guinea
268th STA HOSP – 5 Oct 43 (all-Black Hosp, activated 1 Mar 43)
289th STA HOSP – 25 Jul 44 Guam
328th STA HOSP – 11 May 43 Aleutians
331st STA HOSP – 28 Nov 42 New Caledonia
332d STA HOSP – 27 Nov 42 New Caledonia
335th STA HOSP – (all-Black Hosp, activated 1 Aug 43)
336th STA HOSP – 27 Nov 42 New Caledonia
360th STA HOSP – 28 0ct 43 Australia – 17 Dec 43 Papua-New Guinea (ex-28th SURG HOSP, activated 10 Feb 41, embarked for Australia 4 Mar 42)
361st STA HOSP – 28 Oct 43 Australia (ex-33d SURG HOSP, activated 25 Jan 41, embarked for Australia 2 Aug 42)
362d STA HOSP – 43 Papua-New Guinea
363d STA HOSP – 42 Papua-New Guinea
364th STA HOSP – Papua-New Guinea Jun 43 – Feb 45 New Guinea – 20 May 45 Philippines – 11 Oct 45 Japan
369th STA HOSP – 31 May 44 Saipan Is
371st STA HOSP
372d STA HOSP
373d STA HOSP – 7 Dec 44 Guam
374th STA HOSP – 2 Jan 45 Tinian
383d STA HOSP – 1 Aug 44 Burma – 1 Aug 45 Philippines (all-Black Hosp, personnel supplied by the 335th STA HOSP)

View of the Main Ward of a prefabricated Station Hospital, somewhere in Australia, picture taken in 43. Prefabricated Hospitals were ordered from Australian manufacturers (since US-manufactured units could not be supplied until late 43) and consisted of plywood, masonite, fibrolite, and corrugated iron. These units consisted wholly of portable huts, to which were added concrete floors, roofing and wallsheeting of corrugated iron or asbestos cement; the units came with the necessary tools and assembly instructions. Medical units were advised to include in their organization one well-qualified plumber, one electrician, and two carpenters. The units were constructed and disassembled by medical personnel, assisted by engineers, and could be transported by aircraft.

Ft. Mills STA HOSP – Corregidor, Philippines
Ft. William McKinley STA HOSP – Philippines
Ft. Stotsenburg STA HOSP – Philippines
Schofield Barracks STA HOSP – Hawaii
Ft. Glenn STA HOSP – Umnak Is, Aleutians
Ft. Mears STA HOSP – Unalaska Is, Aleutians
Ft. Randall STA HOSP – Alaska
Naknek Post STA HOSP – Alaska
Nome Post STA HOSP – Alaska
Ladd Field STA HOSP – Alaska
Ft. Richardson STA HOSP – Alaska
Ft. Raymond STA HOSP – Alaska
Cordova Post STA HOSP – Alaska
Yakutat Post STA HOSP – Alaska
Annette Island Post STA HOSP – Alaska
Ft. Seward STA HOSP – Alaska
Juneau Post STA HOSP – Alaska
Ft. Greeley STA HOSP – Alaska

Surgical Hospitals

7th SURG HOSP – 25 Aug 42 Australia (activated 1 Aug 40, redesignated 92d EVAC HOSP, 25 Aug 42)
28th SURG HOSP – 4 Mar 42 Australia (activated 10 Feb 41, redesignated 360th STA HOSP, 28 Oct 43)
33d SURG HOSP – 4 Mar 42 Australia (activated 25 Jan 41, redesignated 361st STA HOSP, 28 Oct 43)

Hospital Centers

26th HOSP CEN – end 44 New Guinea
27th HOSP CEN – 30 Jun 44 New Guinea
28th HOSP CEN – Mar 45 Biak Is
30th HOSP CEN – 30 Dec 44 Leyte, Luzon (activated 30 Dec 44 in the Philippines) (inactivated 25 Jan 46 in the Philippines)
821st HOSP CEN – Aug 45 Tinian Is
Manila HOSP CEN – 9 Dec 41 Philippines

Separate Medical Battalions

12th MED BN – 15 Aug 41 Philippines (ex-12th MED REGT)
13th MED BN – Nov 43 Burma (helped support the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) aka Merrill’s Marauders, originally trained as a MED BN for the Arctic, redesignated 13th MTN MED BN, 7 Nov 44)
59th MED BN – Aug 43 Aleutians
70th MED BN – Jan 45 Luzon
71st MED BN – Sep 42 Hawaii – Dec 44 Leyte – Apr 45 Okinawa (ex-102d MED REGT)
96th MED BN – 26 Apr 45 Okinawa
135th MED BN – Dec 44 Leyte – Jan 45 Luzon
151st MED BN – Aug 43 Burma (supported Merrill’s Marauders, and provided an AIR CLR STA for British and Chinese casualties)

Medical Clearing Companies

In view of the ‘special’ environment and kind of warfare, Clearing Companies often functioned as small Field Hospitals in the Pacific. The other reason was that most battles were small and Hospital units might be absent from the Task Force or remote from the fighting line.

394th MED CLR CO – Jan 45 Luzon (operated a temporary 100-bed medical facility)
893d MED CLR CO – Jan 45 Luzon (operated a temporary 100-bed medical facility) Mar 45 Manila (operated a provisional small hospital)

View of Seagrave Hospital (formally activated as the 896th Med Clr Co in Oct 44) treating casualties in the open, near Myitkyina, Burma. The Hospital in fact operated like a mobile Evacuation Hospital, and whenever feasable, severe medical cases were either evacuated by rail or by air. During the campaign to capture Myitkyina, the Seagrave Hospital, supported by personnel of the 42d and 58th Ptbl Surg Hosp and a surgical team from the 25th Fld Hosp, treated American, British, Chinese, Indian, and Kachin wounded (and later also Japanese PWs). Dr. Gordon S. Seagrave was an American medical missionary running a Hospital close to the Burma Road and the Chinese border, his wide experience and organization were very much appreciated by both British and US authorities, and he was therefore sworn into the US Army as a Major in the Medical Corps on 21 Apr 42.

Separate Medical Collecting Companies

Collecting Companies had a hard time fighting in the Asia-Pacific region. They often had to evacuate casualties from temporary forward Aid Stations, and run a Collecting Station, in a harsh and hostile environment.

409th MED COLL CO – Mar 45 Manila (operated an Air Evac Strip at Rosales and Quezon City)
506th MED COLL CO – Dec 44 New Guinea
644th MED COLL CO – Jan 45 Luzon (operated a temporary 50-bed civilian hospital)
645th MED COLL CO – Oct 44 Leyte

Medical General Laboratories

18th MED GEN LAB – 44 Hawaii
19th MED GEN LAB – Aug 45 Philippines

Separate Medical Groups

80th MED GP – 23 Jun 45 Okinawa
135th MED GP – Oct 44 Leyte – Jan 45 Luzon (comprised the 70th, 135th, 263d, and 264th MED BNs)

Separate Medical Laboratories (Units)

3d MED LAB – Jan 42 Australia
14th MED LAB – Jul 45 Okinawa

Separate Medical Regiments

135th MED REGT – Sep 42 Australia – Jan 43 Papua – Dec 43 New Britain – Dec 44 Biak Is

Separate Medical Hospital Ship Platoons

466th MED HOSP SHIP PLAT – 44 Philippines (activated 12 Aug 44) (inactivated 10 Nov 45 in the Philippines)
576th MED HOSP SHIP PLAT – 44-45 Asiatic-Pacific Theater (activated 25 Mar 43) (inactivated 29 Sep 45 in the ZI)
848th MED HOSP SHIP PLAT – 44 Philippines (activated 25 Aug 43) (inactivated 10 Nov 45 in the Philippines)

Separate Medical Sanitary Companies

721st MED SN CO – Feb 45 Manila, Philippines
722d MED SN CO – Jan 45 Manila, Philippines
725th MED SN CO – Feb 45 Batangas, Philippines
728th MED SN CO – Oct 44 Leyte, Philippines
735th MED SN CO – Feb 45 Manila, Philippines
739th MED SN CO – Oct 44 Leyte, Philippines
742d MED SN CO – Jan 45 La Union, Philippines
743d MED SN CO – Jun 44 Saipan, Mariana Islands
745th MED SN CO – Dec 44 Biak, New Guinea
747th MED SN CO – Oct 44 Leyte, Philippines
759th MED SN CO – Jan 45 Manila, Philippines

Separate Medical Supply Depots

3d MED SUP DEP – 1 Dec 42 Australia
4th MED SUP DEP – 42 Australia (later redesignated 9th MED SUP DEP)
5th MED SUP DEP – Apr 42 Hawaii
9th MED SUP DEP – Nov 42 Papua

Buna casualty arrives at the 171st Station Hospital, at Port Moresby, Papua, Dec 42. This 500-bed Hospital arrived at Port Moresby early December and operated together with the 153d Sta Hosp, the 10th Evac Hosp, and a provisional Battalion of the 135th Med Regt. Because of malaria, those patients who, after treatment, were expected to remain unfit for duty more than 14 days, were usually sent to mainland Australia (Townsville or Brisbane).

Portable Surgical Hospitals (Units)

Portable Surgical Hospitals were first developed in Australia and later adapted to provide skilled surgical care in jungle fighting during the Papuan campaign. These ‘special’ medical units were later attached to Task Forces for providing early frontline surgical care in amphibious operations. The Portable Surgical Hospitals consisted of 4 Officers and 33 EM who carried the necessary equipment and supplies on their backs – depending on circumstances, these units were attached to a Regiment, a Division, or even to an Army. This kind of Hospital  was unique to the Theater.

1st PTBL SURG HOSP – 43 Papua-New Guinea
2d PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua – 43 New Guinea
3d PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua – 43 New Guinea
4th PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua
5th PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua – 43 New Guinea
6th PTBL SURG HOSP – New Guinea – New Britain (worked aboard LST-H) – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
7th PTBL SURG HOSP – 43 Papua-New Guinea – 26 Oct 44 Leyte
8th PTBL SURG HOSP – New Guinea – New Britain (worked aboard LST-H)
9th PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua – May 44 New Guinea
10th PTBL SURG HOSP – New Guinea
11th PTBL SURG HOSP – 43 New Guinea – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
12th PTBL SURG HOSP – 44 Papua-New Guinea
13th PTBL SURG HOSP – New Guinea – New Britain (worked aboard LST-H)
14th PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua
15th PTBL SURG HOSP – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
16th PTBL SURG HOSP – New Guinea – 26 Oct 44 Leyte
17th PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua – New Guinea
18th PTBL SURG HOSP – 14 Sep 42 Australia – Nov 42 Papua – 43 New Guinea – Feb 45 Philippines – 45 Japan (ex-18th SURG HOSP) (activated 14 Sep 42 in Australia) (inactivated 1 Dec 45 in Japan)
19th PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua – 26 Oct 44 Leyte
20th PTBL SURG HOSP – 9 Jan 45 Luzon
21st PTBL SURG HOSP – 9 Jan 45 Luzon
22d PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua – New Guinea
23d PTBL SURG HOSP – Nov 42 Papua

Ward of the 49th General Hospital, at the Manila Jockey Club, Philippines. The Hospital arrived in Manila 1 Mar 45, and was able to take over treatment of numerous casualties, at a time when the Leyte Hospitals were full, and the Sixth US Army installations were lacking medical capacity.

24th PTBL SURG HOSP – 12 Sep 43 New Guinea – 9 Jan 45 Luzon
27th PTBL SURG HOSP – Jun 43 Admiralty Is – 26 Oct 44 Leyte
28th PTBL SURG HOSP – 43 China Defensive – 45 China Offensive (activated 14 Jun 43) (inactivated 20 Dec 45 in India)
30th PTBL SURG HOSP – 44 New Guinea – Bismarck Archipelago – Leyte – Luzon (ex-30th SURG HOSP) (activated 7 Jun 43) (inactivated 31 Oct 45 in Japan)
31st PTBL SURG HOSP – 9 Jan 45 Luzon (activated 7 Jun 43 ZI, inactivated 5 Nov 45 in the Philippines)
32d PTBL SURG HOSP – 44 Burma – 45 China Offensive (activated 7 Jun 43 ZI, inactivated 23 Dec 45 in India)
33d PTBL SURG HOSP – 9 Jan 45 Luzon
34th PTBL SURG HOSP – 44 Burma – Apr 45 China
35th PTBL SURG HOSP – 45 China Offensive
36th PTBL SURG HOSP – 45 China Offensive
40th PTBL SURG HOSP – 45 China Offensive
38th PTBL SURG HOSP – 9 Jan 45 Luzon
41st PTBL SURG HOSP – Oct 44 Okinawa – 45 Leyte (activated 7 Jun 43) (inactivated 31 Oct 45 Philippines)
42d PTBL SURG HOSP – late 43 Burma – 45 China Offensive
43d PTBL SURG HOSP – late 43 Burma – 45 China Offensive
44th PTBL SURG HOSP – 45 China Offensive
45th PTBL SURG HOSP – mid Oct 44 Burma  – 45 China Offensive
46th PTBL SURG HOSP – late 43 Burma – 45 China Offensive
47th PTBL SURG HOSP – 45 China Offensive (ex-47th SURG HOSP) (activated 7 Jun 43) (inactivated 3 Nov 45 in ZI)
48th PTBL SURG HOSP – 45 China Offensive
49th PTBL SURG HOSP – 45 China Offensive
50th PTBL SURG HOSP – 45 China Offensive
51st PTBL SURG HOSP – 26 Oct 44 Leyte – Apr 45 Okinawa
52d PTBL SURG HOSP – 26 Oct 44 Leyte – Apr 45 Okinawa
53d PTBL SURG HOSP – 45 China Offensive
54th PTBL SURG HOSP – 44 New Guinea – Bismarck Archipelago – Leyte – 13 Jan 45 Luzon (activated 15 Aug 43) (inactivated 25 Feb 46 in ZI)
55th PTBL SURG HOSP – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
56th PTBL SURG HOSP – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
57th PTBL SURG HOSP – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
58th PTBL SURG HOSP – 10 Jun 45 Burma – 45 China Offensive
60th PTBL SURG HOSP – mid Oct 44 Burma – 45 China Offensive
61st PTBL SURG HOSP – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
62d PTBL SURG HOSP – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
63d PTBL SURG HOSP – 13 Jan 45 Luzon
64th PTBL SURG HOSP – Mar 45 Philippines
66th PTBL SURG HOSP – Apr 45 Okinawa
67th PTBL SURG HOSP – Apr 45 Okinawa
95th PTBL SURG HOSP – 24 Jul 44 Guam – Dec 44 Leyte
96th PTBL SURG HOSP – 44 Tinian Is – 20 Jun Saipan Is – Apr 45 Okinawa
97th PTBL SURG HOSP – 44 Tinian Is – 20 Jun Saipan Is
98th PTBL SURG HOSP– 44 Saipan Is – 20 Jun 44 Saipan Is – Apr 45 Okinawa

This page was printed from the WW2 US Medical Research Centre on 21st September 2019 at 18:20.
Read more: https://www.med-dept.com/articles/ww2-military-hospitals-pacific-theater-of-operations/