The WW2 Medical Detachment Infantry Regiment

An enlisted man of the 26th Portable Surgical Hospital applies an adhesive bandage to the stomach wound of a patient. Biak Island, Dutch New Guinea. June 18, 1944.

Background:

During WW2 Medical Detachments were “attached” to each Infantry Regiment. Their mission was to help conserve the strength of the Regiment by taking the necessary preventive and sanitary measures, and provide appropriate medical and dental treatment.
Officers and Enlisted Men were adequately trained in medical and other skills. EM were not only  trained for different duties such as: Dental – Medical – Sanitary and Surgical Technicians, but also as Record Clerks, Litter Bearers, Podiatrists, and Light Truck Drivers.
Detachments were responsible for first echelon medical service in combat situations, including emergency medical treatment in the field, removal of battle casualties, and establishment of Aid Stations for the reception, triage, temporary care, and treatment of casualties.
In situations other than combat, the Medical Detachment provided basic medical care by operating one or more Dispensaries for emergency treatment and care of the Regiment’s sick and injured. In addition, it was responsible for routine duties, proper sanitation, physical examination, first aid, personal hygiene, and the clerical work necessary for proper administration of the Detachment.
On the march, whether in combat or not, the Detachment always rendered emergency medical treatment. Three Company Aidmen accompanied each Rifle Company; that is one for each Platoon. Each Battalion Section, less the Company Aidmen and the Battalion Surgeon, immediately followed the Infantry Battalion it supported. Battalion Surgeons rode with their organization commanders or their immediate Staff. One Ambulance from the Collecting Company (the Infantry Division’s organic Medical Battalion), responsible for second echelon care, was attached to each Battalion Medical Section for the duration of the march. When march casualties occurred, they were either treated by a Company Aidman, and then rejoined their units, or were put in an Ambulance, or kept under observation. All casualties (sick, injured, or disabled personnel) separated from their organization, were to be tagged by the Medical Officer (arms and individual equipment, were to remain with the casualty). In order to care for any casualties, Collecting Posts were often established along the road by the Collecting Companies.

We will now describe the functions and duties of the different subordinate sections of the Medical Detachment (Infantry Regiment).

Headquarters:

The Headquarters was part of the Headquarters Section and consisted of the Detachment Commander (also the Regimental Surgeon), assisted by a number of Noncommissioned personnel for the administration of the Section. The Commander had dual duties, i.e. Staff and Command.

Regimental Surgeon’s Staff Duties:
As a member of the Regimental Commander’s Staff, the Regimental Surgeon acted in an advisory capacity, his main task was to keep his CO informed as to the capabilities of the Medical Detachment and the medical situation in general. He had to initiate all measures for the prevention and control of communicable, infectious, and deficiency diseases; the improvement of physical condition of both Officers and EM of the command; the prevention of non-battle injuries; and the reduction of mortality and morbidity from battle injuries. Based on the unit’s tactical plan, he made a medical estimate of the situation and submitted medical recommendations to the CO for the Headquarters Section and Companies (excluding the three Battalion Sections).
His other multiple duties consisted of the preparation of casualty records (such as Aid Station Logs – Sanitary Reports – Report Sheets – Statistical Reports – Emergency Medical Tags’ Duplicates), the prescription of the technical procedures to be practised by the Detachment, the supervision over the Battalion Medical Sections, and the preparation of status reports related to medical supplies. The Medical Detachment Commander was not only responsible to the Regimental Commander for instruction of all personnel in matters concerning first aid, personal hygiene, and sex hygiene, he also had to report to the next higher medical echelon on the medical and tactical situation of his organization! Since T/Es did neither include any mess equipment nor cooks, Medical Detachment personnel were to mess with the units they supported.

Medical Personnel inspect the feet of fellow GIs for the presence of “Trench Foot”, a condition rife in the cold damp conditions of the “Battle of the Bulge”, Belgium December, 1944.

Regimental Surgeon’s Command Duties:
As the senior Medical Officer present, the Regimental Surgeon commanded the Medical Detachment. His responsibilities covered the organization, administration, discipline, and training of the Detachment. He had to prepare and submit the required reports and keep the Detachment records. The Regimental Surgeon was the only person to decide when and where to set up and operate the Regimental Aid Station. He further handled procurement, storage, and distribution of supplies for the Medical Detachment. Other command duties concerned preparation of the unit plan for the operation of the Headquarters Section, as well as drafting the necessary plans for evacuation and treatment of casualties within the Regimental area.

Headquarters Section:

In addition to the Medical Detachment Commander, Commissioned personnel usually included 1 Medical Officer (XO, General Duty), who could, if necessary, be designated by the Surgeon to reinforce personnel of any of the Medical Battalion Sections, and 2 Dental Officers, one of whom was the Regimental Dental Surgeon directly responsible to the Detachment CO.
Major functions of the Headquarters Section were to assist the Regimental Surgeon in procuring the necessary medical supplies for the Regiment and for the Medical Detachment. Provide first echelon medical service to Regimental Headquarters, and to all personnel (except Battalion Sections) including Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Service Company, Cannon Company, and Antitank Company, by supplying attached Company Aidmen to the different units. Other tasks were to provide first echelon medical service for Battalions in reserve, in order to allow their Battalion Medical Sections to preserve full tactical mobility. The Headquarters Section had to be prepared, in emergencies, to relieve a Battalion Medical Section of accumulated casualties, so that it could regain its tactical mobility; it was also ready to serve as a pool for replacements and a source of reinforcements for any Battalion Section! Since the Headquarters Section consisted of a Dental Surgeon (assisted by a number of Dental Technicians), it was to provide overall dental service for the whole Infantry Regiment.

Headquarters & Headquarters Company > 2 aidmen (later reduced to 1)
Service Company > 1 aidman
Cannon Company > 3 aidmen
Antitank Company > 3 aidmen

Battalion Sections:

Each of the three Infantry Regimental Medical Detachments consisted of 1 Headquarters Section – and 3 Battalion Sections. The three Battalion Medical Sections of the Regimental Medical Detachment had identical organization  and functions. It should be remembered that the Battalion Section was a subordinate element of the Medical Detachment, and not of the Infantry Battalion. It was however designed to serve a Battalion and was therefore attached to it. The Battalion Medical Section was commanded by the senior Officer (MC) assigned thereto and present for duty. The Battalion Surgeon, also the Battalion Medical Section Commander, was immediately responsible to the Infantry Battalion CO, and to the Regimental Surgeon in his Staff capacity exercising only professional (i.e. medical technical) supervision over the Battalion Sections’ operations.

Battalion Surgeon’s Duties:
The Battalion Medical Section’s Surgeon had Staff functions comparable to those of the Regimental Surgeon. His specific duties during combat were:
Based on the tactical plan, to make a medical estimate of the situation, hence submit a medical plan to the Battalion CO for approval, and after approval, to prepare an organization plan for the operation of the Battalion Medical Section. He was also to establish and operate the Battalion Aid Station, and to give emergency medical treatment, devoting his attention mainly to the serious wounded. The Section Commander was to keep in contact with the Infantry Battalion CO and his Staff, to learn the anticipatory planning of the Commander, and to project his own plans in accordance with that planning. The Battalion Surgeon was to direct the necessary ground reconnaissance, when practicable, for possible relocation of the Aid Station. Finally, he was to keep, at all times, the Battalion Commander, the Regimental Surgeon, and the Collecting Company Commander informed of the medical and tactical situation including supply.

Battalion Executive Officer’s Duties:
Each Battalion Medical Section (CO > Battalion Surgeon) had an Officer (MAC), duly trained in emergency medical treatment. His specific duties were to:
Assist the Battalion Surgeon in any possible manner, and give emergency medical treatment to the wounded devoting his attention mainly to the slightly wounded. Supervise the employment of Company Aidmen, and direct the employment of the Litter Squads.

Medical Officer pertaining to the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment  (82d Abn Div) offers a cigarette to a wounded German soldier somewhere in France. June, 1944.

Company Aid Men:
Company Aidmen were attached to Companies pertaining to the Battalion on the basis of one per Platoon. These men were all Surgical Technicians, and their duties were to:
Give emergency medical treatment either on or off the battlefield. Group the casualties in marked and protected places to await arrival of Litter Bearers. Direct the walking wounded to the Aid Station. Keep the Battalion Surgeon informed of the overall medical situation by means of messages carried back by Litter Squads or walking wounded. Fill out and attach the required Emergency Medical Tags, for wounded and dead when time and the tactical situation permitted this.

Rifle Company > 2 aidmen (later reduced to 1)
Heavy Weapons Company > 3 aidmen

Litter Bearers:
Litter Squads ordinarily consisted of four Bearers. Fewer Bearers were unable to withstand the fatigue of long or frequent carries. The function of Litter Squads of attached Medical Sections were to:
Maintain contact with the combat elements, clear the battlefield of casualties, removing those unable to walk to the Battalion Aid Station or to the pre-arranged Collecting Points. Administer emergency medical treatment, and assist the Aid Station Group in moving and re-establishing the Aid Station. Act as messenger to the higher echelon, i.e. the Battalion Surgeon, and fill out and attach EMTs to the wounded and the dead, when time and situation permitted.

Medical Personnel and French Civilians load casualties onto 2 ½-Ton GMC Trucks for evacuation from 505th (Parachute) Regimental Aid Station #2, Ste-Mère-Eglise. June, 1944.

Battalion Aid Station:
A Battalion Aid Station was established for the treatment of casualties and their care while awaiting further evacuation. The Aid Station personnel included two Officers (Battalion Surgeon + Assistant), as well as a number of NCOs and Technicians. After the Battalion Commander had approved the site selected by the Battalion Surgeon, the Aid Station was set up. Battalion Aid Stations were however not established during a rapid advance, in case maintaining contact with the units proved too difficult. In any case, only that part of the Aid Station immediately required would be set up, taking into consideration the tactical operation of the unit supported. It was of the utmost importance to select a good site for the Aid Station, with the necessary protection and concealment. Litter carry was to be kept as short as possible, prompt evacuation and treatment were important, protection from the enemy and the elements was mandatory, and facility of future movement, to front or rear, was to be foreseen. The Aid Station was the place where casualties were received and treated, and where they could await further evacuation. The Aid Station consisted of two separate sections, dealing with slightly and seriously wounded. Gas casualties were to be treated at some distance from other patients.
The Battalion Surgeon, being in command, assumed all responsibility for decisions and plans concerning the Aid Station. Being on the Staff of the Infantry Battalion Commander, he had to perform all the duties required of a Staff Surgeon (he was the senior Medical Officer in the Battalion Medical Section), but he could of course delegate some of his duties to his Medical Assistant (MAC Officer) according to the current circumstances and the abilities of the Officer. He was further assisted by an NCO duly trained in adequate emergency treatment, who could replace the Battalion Surgeon or his Medical Assistant, when absent. General supervision of Enlisted personnel and procurement of supplies were covered by the Staff Sergeant. Distribution of personnel and assignment of duties in the Aid Station remained at the discretion of the Battalion Surgeon. The Surgeon’s Assistant usually treated the slightly wounded and, if necessary, prepared them for evacuation assisted by a Corporal. Enlisted Medical and Surgical Technicians received casualties, sterilized instruments, administered hypodermic medication, performed shock nursing, and were responsible for setting up and moving the Aid Station’s equipment. Casualties were fully examined and necessary emergency treatment given, either to enable them at once to return to duty, or to prepare them for further evacuation. The treatment was generally limited to arresting of hemorrhage, immobilization of fractures, application of sterile dressings, administration of tetanus toxoid and of morphine, and treatment of shock. The necessary additional entries were made on each casualty’s EMT by the Medical Officer treating him.

Remark:
Training programs for the Medical Detachment were based on orders from the Regimental Commander, but were prepared by the Detachment CO. Medical training requirements were based on the scope and objective of specific treatment and nursing as currently required by the organization. In addition to individual and unit medical training, the various functional groups were to follow special and intensive training in other important functions such as, packing and unpacking of Medical Chests (both in daylight and at night), loading and unloading equipment (day and night), entrucking and detrucking, improvisation of surgical aids (splints, litters, tourniquets), establishing the Aid Station under varying terrain and weather conditions, use of ground cover, concealment, and camouflage, orientation on the ground (day and night), estimation of the terrain, and types of dispositions, operations, and movements…

Manpower:

MEDICAL DETACHMENT (Infantry Regiment) WW2 Basic Organization

MEDICAL DETACHMENT (Infantry Regiment) T/O 7-11 dated October 1, 1940

Total Commissioned Personnel (10)

1 Major (Regimental Surgeon)
5 Captain (including 2 Dental Officers)
4 First Lieutenant (including 1 Dental Officer)

Total Enlisted Personnel (96)

1 Technical Sergeant
3 Staff Sergeant
1 Sergeant
3 Corporal
88 Private, Private First Class, Technician 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th Class (including Record Clerk, Motorcyclist, Chauffeur, Litter Bearer, Basic Aidman, Medical Technician, Sanitary Technician, Surgical Technician, and Dental Technician personnel)

Total Vehicles (17)

1 Motorcycle with Side Car (to provide transportation for personnel engaged in reconnaissance, messenger service, and police operations)
2 Truck, ½ Ton, Command & Reconnaissance (to provide transportation for staff officers in the field)
12 Truck, ½ Ton, Weapon Carrier (to transport weapons, personnel and cargo)
2 Truck, 1½ Ton, Cargo (to transport general cargo and personnel)

MEDICAL DETACHMENT (Infantry Regiment) T/O 7-11 February 10, 1942

Total Commissioned Personnel (10)

1 Major (Regimental Surgeon)
5 Captain (including 1 Dental Officer)
4 First Lieutenant (including 1 Dental Officer)

Total Enlisted Personnel (126)

1 Technical Sergeant
3 Staff Sergeant
1 Sergeant
3 Corporal
118 Private, Private First Class, Technician 4th, 5th Class (including Record Clerk, Chauffeur, Litter Bearer, Basic Aidman, Medical Technician, Sanitary Technician, Surgical Technician, and Dental Technician personnel)

Total Vehicles (8)

7 Truck, ¼ Ton (to carry personnel, primarily for command and reconnaissance, to transport light cargo, to tow 37-mm antitank gun)
7 Trailer, ¼ Ton (to transport general cargo on land or through water)
1 Truck, 2½ Ton, Cargo w/o Winch (to transport general cargo and personnel)

MEDICAL DETACHMENT (Infantry Regiment) T/O 7-11 dated March 1, 1943

Total Commissioned Personnel (9)

1 Major
4 Captain (including 1 Dental Officer)
4 First Lieutenant (including 1 Dental Officer)

Total Enlisted Personnel (103)

1 Technical Sergeant
3 Staff Sergeant
1 Sergeant
3 Corporal
95 Private, Private First Class, Technician 4th, 5th Grade (including Record Clerk, Light Truck Driver, Litter Bearer, Basic Aidman, Medical Technician, Sanitary Technician, Surgical Technician, and Dental Technician personnel)

Total Vehicles (8)

7 Truck, ¼ Ton (to carry personnel, primarily for command and reconnaissance, to transport light cargo, to tow 37-mm antitank gun)
7 Trailer, ¼ Ton (to transport general cargo on land or through water)
1 Truck, 1½ Ton, Cargo w/o Winch (to transport general cargo and personnel) or Truck 2½ Ton, Cargo w/o Winch (as substitute)

MEDICAL DETACHMENT (Infantry Regiment) T/O 7-11 February 26, 1944

Total Commissioned Personnel (9)

1 Major (Regimental Surgeon)
8 Captain or First Lieutenant (including 2 Dental Officers)

Total Enlisted Personnel (126)

1 Technical Sergeant
3 Staff Sergeant
1 Sergeant
3 Corporal
118 Private, Private First Class, Technician 3d, 4th, 5th Grade (including Record Clerk, Light Truck Driver, Litter Bearer, Podiatrist, Basic Aidman, Medical Technician, Sanitary Technician, Surgical Technician, and Dental Technician personnel)

Total Vehicles (8)

7 Truck, ¼ Ton (to carry personnel, primarily for command and reconnaissance, to transport light cargo, to tow 37-mm antitank gun)
7 Trailer, ¼ Ton (to transport general cargo on land or through water)
1 Truck, 2½ Ton, Cargo w/o Winch (to transport general cargo and personnel)

Remark:
T/O 7-11 underwent more amendments: July 15, 1943, it indicated a total manpower of 9 Officers and 126 Enlisted Men, and in March and June 1944, it reverted to 10 Officers and 126 EM with a total of 5 Vehicles.

A Surgical Technician of the Medical Detachment, 7th Infantry Regiment (3d Inf Div), helps a wounded soldier to a blood transfusion. Sicily, August 1943.

Equipment (as per T/E 7-11-M, dated March 1, 1943):

Chemical Equipment:
Apparatus, Decontaminating, 1½-qt, M2, w/Funnel > 8 (1 per Truck)
Curtain, Gas Proof, M1 > 6 (2 per Battalion Section)
Mask, Gas, Service > 112 (1 per Individual) (not more than 30% of the Masks issued may be Diaphragm)
Respirator, Dust, M2 > 8 (1 per Truck)

Engineer Equipment:
Compass, Watch > 14 (1 per Officer, T/Sgt, S/Sgt, Sgt)
Net, Camouflage, Cotton, Shrimp, 22 Feet x 22 Feet > 14 (1 per Truck ¼-Ton, 1 per Trailer ¼-Ton) – Stock No. 49-4612.45-65 (O.D.) + Stock No. 49-4612.45-75 (Sand)
Net, Camouflage, Cotton, Shrimp, 36 Feet x 44 Feet > 1 (per Truck 1½-Ton) (Net, Camouflage, Cotton, Shrimp, will be issued in Olive Drab or Sand, solid Color, when and as authorized by Army or Theater of Operations Commander) – Stock No. 49-4612.6-65 (O.D.) + Stock No. 49-4612.6-75 (Sand)
Template, Map, M1 > 9 (1 per Officer)

Medical Equipment:
Brassard, Geneva Convention > 112 (1 per Individual in Theater of Operations) – Item No. 9913500
Kit, Dental, Officer’s > 2 (1 per Dental Officer) – Item No. 9710000
Kit, Dental, Private’s > 2 (1 per Dental Technician) – Item No. 9710500
Kit, Medical, Officer’s > 7 (1 per Medical Officer) – Item No. 9711500
Kit, Medical, Noncommissioned Officer’s > 8 (1 per T/Sgt, S/Sgt, Sgt, Cpl) – Item No. 9711000
Kit, Medical, Private’s > 84 (1 per Litter Bearer, Medical Technician, Sanitary Technician, Surgical Technician, Record Clerk, Light Truck Driver) – Item No. 9712000
Case, Tent, Pin > 4 (1 per Headquarters Section, 1 per Battalion Section)
Chest, MD # 1 > 7 (1 per Headquarters Section, 2 per Battalion Section) – Item No. 9756500
Chest, MD # 2 > 4 (1 per Headquarters Section, 1 per Battalion Section) – Item No. 9757000
Chest, MD # 4 > 1 (1 per Headquarters Section) – Item No. 9757500
Chest, MD # 60 > 2 (1 per Dental Officer, Captain, 1 per Dental Officer, Lieutenant) – Item No. 9502500
Kit, First-Aid, Motor Vehicle, 12-Unit > 2 (1 per 4 Trucks, or Fraction thereof) – Item No. 9777300
Suction, for Snake Bite > 7 (1 per Headquarters Section, 2 per Battalion Section) – Item No. 3705500
Litter, Steel Pole > 42 (6 per Headquarters Section, 12 per Battalion Section) – Item No. 9937600
Machine, Imprinting > 8 (2 per Headquarters Section, 2 per Battalion Section) – Item No. 9938700
Set, Blanket, Small > 7 (1 per Headquarters Section, 2 per Battalion Section) – Item No. 9746500
Set, Gas Casualty > 4 (1 per Headquarters Section, 1 per Battalion Section in Theater of Operations) – Item No. 9795600
Lantern > 4 (1 per Headquarters Section, 1 per Battalion Section) – Item No. 9777500
Set, Splint > 7 (1 per Headquarters Section, 2 per Battalion Section) – Item No. 9781500
Splint, Litter Bar > 42 (6 per Set, Splint) – Item No. 3743900

Ordnance Equipment:
Binocular, M3, w/Case, Carrying, M17 > 1 (1 per Headquarters Section, senior Medical Officer)
Truck, ¼-Ton, 4 x 4 > 7 (per Medical Detachment)
Truck, 1½-Ton, 6 x 6, Cargo w/o Winch > 1 (per Medical Detachment) (pending availability, Substitute is Truck, 2½-Ton, 6 x 6, Cargo, w/o Winch)
Trailer, ¼-Ton, 2-W, Cargo > 7 (per Medical Detachment)
Axe, Handled, Chopping, Single Bit, Standard Grade, 4 lb > 7 (1 per Truck, ¼-Ton) – Stock No. 41-A-1277
Chain, Motor Vehicle, Tow, 16 Feet x 7/16 Inch > 1 (1 per Truck, 1½-Ton)
Defroster and Deicer, Electric, Windshield > 8 (1 per Truck, when authorized by Army or Theater of Operations Commander)
Rope, Tow, 1 Inch Diameter, 20 Feet Long > 7 (1 per Truck, ¼-Ton)
Shovel, General Purpose, D-Handled, Strap Back, Round Point, No. 2 > 7 (1 per Truck, ¼-Ton) – Stock No. 41-S-3170
Tool Set, Complete w/Tools, Pioneer Equipment, Motor Vehicle Set, No. 1 > 1 (per Truck, 1½-Ton)
Tube, Flexible Nozzle, for Refillable Gasoline Drums > 8 (1 per Truck) – Stock No. 42-T-13600

Quartermaster Equipment:
Axe, Intrenching, M1910 > 10 (1 per 10 Enlisted Men) – Stock No. 74-A-100
Bag, Canvas, Water, Sterilizing > 4 (1 per Headquarters Section, 1 per Battalion Section)  – Stock No. 24-B-1170
Bucket, Canvas, Watering, 18-qt > 8 (1 per Truck) – Stock No. 34-B-15000
Bucket, General Purpose, Galvanized, Heavy Weight, 14-qt, Type II, w/o Lip > 9 (3 per Headquarters Section, 2 per Battalion Section) – Stock No. 42-B-25520
Carrier, Axe, Intrenching, M1910 > 10 (1 per Axe, Intrenching) – Stock No. 74-C-120
Carrier, Pickmattock, Intrenching, M1910 > 20 (1 per Pickmattock, Intrenching) – Stock No. 74-C-154
Carrier, Shovel, Intrenching, M1910 > 73 (1 per Shovel, Intrenching) – Stock No. 74-C-165
Carrier, Wire Cutter, M1938 > 20 (1 per Wire Cutter) – Stock No. 74-C-187
Case, Dispatch, Canvas, M1938 > 13 (1 per Officer, T/Sgt, S/Sgt) – Stock No. 24-C-535
Can, Water, 5-gal > 12 (1 per 10 Individuals, or Fraction thereof) – Stock No. 64-C-281 + Item No. 9915700
Cutter, Wire, M1938 > 20 (2 per 10 Enlisted Men) – Stock No. 74-C-330
Drum, Inflammable Liquid, Gasoline, Steel, w/Carrying Handle, Capacity, 5-gal > 9 (1 per Truck, ¼-Ton, 2 per Truck, 1 ½-Ton) – Stock No. 42-D-1280
Flag, Geneva Convention, Red Cross, Bunting, Ambulance and Marker, w/Case, Flag, Duck, Automobile > 7 (1 per Headquarters Section, 2 per Battalion Section) – Stock No. 5-F-2150 + Stock No. 5-C-50
Goggles, M1942, Complete > 8 (1 per Truck) or 112 (1 per Individual, when authorized by Army or Theater of Operations Commander)
Kit, Sewing > 9 (1 per 12 Individuals) – Stock No. 27-K-300
Lantern, Gasoline, w/Mantle and Pump > 4 (1 per Headquarters Section, 1 per Battalion Section) – Stock No. 31-L-408
Pickmattock, Intrenching, M1910 > 20 (2 per 10 Enlisted Men) – Stock No. 74-P-80
Shovel, Intrenching, M1910 > 73 (7 per 10 Enlisted Men) – Stock No. 74-S-160
Stove, Tent, Complete, M1941 > 5 (1 per Tent, when authorized by Army or Theater of Operations Commander) – Stock No. 65-N-2500
Tent, Pyramidal, Complete w/Pins and Poles > 1 (1 per Headquarters Section) – Stock No. 24-T-320
Tent, Wall, Small, Complete w/Fly , Pins and poles > 4 (1 per Headquarters Section, 1 per Battalion Section) – Stock No. 24-T-323
Whistle, Thunderer > 14 (1 per Officer, T/Sgt, S/Sgt, Sgt) – Stock No. 74-W-80

Signal Equipment:
Flashlight, TL-122 (B-C-D) > 17 (1 per Officer, Record Clerk, Litter Bearer, Truck driver, Light Truck driver)

Ref. T/E 7-11-M – A.G. 820.2 (2-4-43)
We have tried to add relevant Item and/or Stock Numbers as far as they were available.

Remark:
According to some other sources, additional equipment was introduced after June 1944. They included  important, new or improved items, such as: Packboard, Plywood, Stock No. 74-P-27-20 – Attachment, Packboard, Plywood, Cargo, Stock No. 74-A-33-25 – Strap, Quick Release, Packboard, Type 1, Stock No. 74-S-349-80 – Bag, Canvas, Water, Sterilizing, Porous, w/ Cover and Hanger, Stock No. 24-B-1171, etc.

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