Kits of Veterinary PersonnelMedical Kits & Contents

The Army Veterinary Service was not a supply service in the sense that it purchased, stored, distributed, or otherwise handled professional veterinary equipment and supplies for the Army; it was a consumer. Nor was the Army Veterinary Service materially involved (that is, as final approving authority) in the planning for its own supply; however, some developmental studies were undertaken. These matters originated with the supply activities of the Medical Department as a whole. Individual Veterinary Corps officers and units requisitioned for their supplies in the same manner that the Medical Corps and Dental Corps obtained their supplies; their needs, such as for certain drugs, surgical dressings, and instruments, were often furnished from the same stocks of Medical Department supplies. In fact, the Army Veterinary Service had only little more to do with Medical Department supply than it had to do with the trucks, communications equipment, or weapons that were obtained and were used daily by each veterinary unit and detachment.

Provisional Pack Train of the 3d Infantry Division (Seventh United States Army), used in the Sicily campaign and operated by the Veterinary Service, July-August 1943

Early in WW2, both the Cavalry and the Field Artillery still took the majority of riding horses, but the following mechanization and large-scale dismounting influenced its procurement, and led to closure of some depots in 1942, and more still in 1943. There was however a slight increase in demand in 1943, emanating from the Coast Guard, which organized mounted shore patrols. Although demand and requirements further declined, it did not prevent the Army to continue its horse breeding program. In the end, Horses’ procurement would stop in 1944, while Mules continued to be procured throughout WW2, even reaching a peak figure in 1943, and then gradually decreasing again. A few thousand Mules were shipped to the Armed Forces overseas and also supplied to Britain under Lend-Lease. Additional animal requirements were then mostly procured and trained locally, often captured from the enemy, or purchased or hired from civilians.

In overseas Theaters, not only Horses and Mules were to serve, sentry and mine Dogs too were called upon, and were already introduced in North Africa in November of 1942. In 1943, pack animals used as carriers, were now formed into Mule Trains in Tunisia, Sicily and later in Italy, and the QMC procured Horses, Mules, and Donkeys from local sources, until the first Mules could be shipped over from the ZI. Cavalry Divisions, Mountain Divisions, and the Phillipine Division, still widely used Horses and Mules – but their use would not be limited to the MTO and CBI Theaters only . In the European Theater, Horses and Mules (primarily pack animals) would still be trained and used in 1944 in Southern France and in Italy, for obvious terrain reasons, and the need for them was still indicated in T/Os as far late as November 1944! Remount Depots, Veterinary Hospitals and Rehabilitation Farms had to be established by the Quartermaster where necessary, units formed, people trained, and hay and forage locally procured. Even up to the end of World War 2, Veterinary personnel were never redundant.

It must be stated, that in Theaters, where animals were mainly used for recreational and limited military purposes, members of the Veterinary Corps were chiefly concerned with meat and food inspection and supervision over animals and other food sources raised for consumption of the troops. The Veterinary service conducted meat and dairy hygiene activities and inspections to ensure strict compliance with US Army standards. When standards were found to be satisfactory, local Theater sources of supply were recommended, however the majority of food products came in by ship from the United States, or was procured from specific sources with friendly Governments.

This article looks at the equipment of the personnel which formed the Army Veterinary Corps.

9713500 – Kit, Veterinary Private’s, Complete:
9713500 - Kit, Veterinary Private's, Complete
Number Item Quantity
9706500 Kit Component, Cantle Ring Strap 2
9708500 Kit Component, Pouch 2
9709500 Kit Component, Suspender 1
In Right Hand Pouch
2008000 Bandage, Muslin, 3-Inch by 5 Yards, 12 6 Bandages
2013000 Cotton, Absorbent, Compressed, 1 oz 1
2024000 Gauze, Plain, Sterilized, 36-Inch, 1 Yard 1
3472000 Scissors, Operating, 6 1/2-inch, Straight, Double-blunt 1
7624000 Pencil, Lead 1
7877000 Pin, Safety, Large 1
8105000 Retainer, Dressing, Foot, Veterinary, Set of 4 1
9112000 Iodine Swab, 1 1/2-cc, 6 2
9208000 Oakum, 2 oz 1
9767500 Container, Metal, No. 1 (For 9112000) 1
9805700 Case, Instrument, Veterinary Private’s, Complete 1
Form 115b Emergency Veterinary Tag (20 in book in duplicate) 1
In Left Hand Pouch
9204000 Bandage, Triangular, Compressed, White 3
9206000 Dressing, First-Aid, Small, White 8
9712500 – Kit, Veterinary Noncomissioned Officer’s, Complete:
9712500 - Kit, Veterinary Noncomissioned Officer's, Complete
Number Item Quantity
9706500 Kit Component, Cantle Ring Strap 2
9708500 Kit Component, Pouch 2
9709500 Kit Component, Suspender 1
In Right Hand Pouch
2008000 Bandage, Muslin, 3-Inch by 5 Yards, 12 3 Bandages
4415000 Stopper, Rubber, Solid, No. 2 (For 9960500) 1
7624000 Pencil, Lead 1
9112000 Iodine Swab, 1 1/2-cc, 6 2
9208000 Oakum, 2 oz 1
9767500 Container, Metal, No. 1 (For 9112000) 1
9768500 Container, Metal, No. 4 (For 9960500) 1
9805500 Case, Instrument, Veterinary Noncommissioned Officer’s, Complete 1
9960500 Vial, Glass, 60-cc, Amber: For the following: 1
1159000    Cresol, Saponated Solution, 1 q t 60 cc
Form 115b Emergency Veterinary Tag (20 in book in duplicate) 1
In Left Hand Pouch
2013000 Cotton, Absorbent, Compressed, 1 oz 2
2024000 Gauze, Plain, Sterilized, 36-Inch, 1 Yard 2
4415000 Stopper, Rubber, Solid, No. 2 (For 9960500) 2
7877000 Pin, Safety, Large 1
9204000 Bandage, Triangular, Compressed, White 2
9208000 Oakum, 2 oz 1
9768500 Container, Metal, No. 4 (For 9960500) 1
9960500 Vial, Glass, 60-cc, Amber: For the following: 1
1060000    Ammonia, Aromatic Spirit, 1 pt 60 cc
9713000 – Kit, Veterinary Officer’s, Complete:
 9713000 - Kit, Veterinary Officer's, Complete
Number Item Quantity
9706500 Kit Component, Cantle Ring Strap 1
9708000 Kit Component, Litter Strap 1
9708500 Kit Component, Pouch 1
2008000 Bandage, Muslin, 3-Inch by 5 Yards, 12 2 Bandages
2013000 Cotton, Absorbent, Compressed, 1 oz 1
2024000 Gauze, Plain, Sterilized, 36-Inch, 1 Yard 1
7624000 Pencil, Lead 1
8019000 Case, Hypodermic Tablets, Veterinary, Complete 1
8023000 Case, Pocket, Veterinary, Complete 1
8105000 Retainer, Dressing, Foot, Veterinary, Set of 4 1
8116000 Syringe, Hypodermic, 10-cc, Quitman Type 1
8127000 Thermometer, Clinical, Veterinary 1
9112000 Iodine Swab, 1 1/2-cc, 6 2
9767500 Container, Metal, No. 1 (For 9112000) 1
9951500 Sterilizer, Hypodermic Needle 1
Form 115b Emergency Veterinary Tag (20 in book in duplicate) 1

During 1944, minor modifications were to take place, such as replacement of the No. 1 Metal Container (containing 2 x 6 Iodine Swabs) by a simple Cardboard box holding only 6 Iodine Swabs. In the course of 1945, all White material used in bandages and dressings was to be replaced by less conspicuous Field Brown fabric. Following general improvements and new developments in medicine, some products were either deleted, or simply replaced by better ones.

This page was printed from the WW2 US Medical Research Centre on 19th January 2019 at 02:32.
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