130th Evacuation HospitalUnit History

Left: Summer of 1944. On the road to Fort Jackson, Columbia, South Carolina. The picture illustrates the 5th War Loan Rally display with its moto “More Bonds – Less Lives”.
Right: Poster announcing the 5th War Loan Drive, which started 12 June 1944 and ended 8 July 1944. Its goal was to reach $ 16,000,000,000.

Activation:

The 130th Evacuation Hospital (Semimobile) was officially activated at Fort Jackson, Columbia, South Carolina (Infantry Training Center: total, acreage 58,653, with a troop capacity for 5,097 Officers & 72,817 EM –ed) 20 March 1944 by Letter, Office of the Commanding Officer, Headquarters Second United States Army, Memphis 15, Tennessee, Subject: “Letter Orders No. A 3-9, Activation of 130th and 131st Evacuation Hospitals, 400-bed, (Semimobile)”, dated 11 March 1944.

Lt. Colonel Robert L. Callison, MC, formerly CO of the 312th Medical Battalion (87th Infantry Division) and later Division Surgeon, assumed command of the organization upon activation, with the unit being subsequently assigned to Twelfth Detachment, Special Troops, Second United States Army, for administration and training. The Hospital cadre was furnished by the 108th Evacuation Hospital and was comprised of 34 Enlisted Men, Medical Department Specialists and specially-trained Medical NCOs. The majority of the hospital fillers came from Reception Centers at Camp Beauregard, Alexandria, Louisiana (Military Reservation –ed), Jefferson Barracks, Barnhart, Missouri (Military Range –ed), and Fort Snelling, St. Paul, Minnesota (Army Service Forces Reception Center – ed), and were chiefly from the rural areas of Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, North and South Dakota. Since the majority of the Officers and the Nurses were not needed in the early phases of training, they were not assigned until shortly before departure of the unit for overseas duty.

Partial copy (page) of Report of Combined Airborne-Troop Carrier Maneuver September 24 – 29, 1944 showing the troops involved, including the 130th Evacuation Hospital.

Training:

Before arrival of the filler replacements, the Training Schedule of the organization was prepared to permit the instruction of cadre men on basic military and medical subjects in the morning hours and fatigue details in the afternoon improving the buildings, the unit area, and preparing the charts and instructional aids to be used in training the new men. The purpose of the cadre training period was to train the Non-Commissioned Officers of the unit in such manner that they could participate in  instruction and demonstration in all of the basic subjects. Cadre training was completed on 8 May 1944 when the greater percentage of replacements had joined the organization.

Basic Training of the Hospital personnel began 15 May 1944; the objective being to teach men the art of being a soldier, impress upon them the reason and necessity for military courtesy and discipline, train them in the ways and means of self-sustenance and preservation, and provide them with a basic knowledge of Medical Department technical subjects. Both literature and training aids were largely and effectively used, equipment was carefully selected and special demonstrations with proper appliances and equipment were utilized whenever possible. A complete set of charts (as described in the “Instructors Guide”) was made and proved to be of great value during courses. The unit had free access to motion picture equipment and made maximum use of it. Films were usually followed by applicatory exercises.

Apart from the basic text references used by the Instructors such as: Field Manuals (e.g. FM 8-35 Transportation of the Sick and Wounded), Technical Manuals (e.g. TM 8-233 Manual for Pharmacy Technicians), Army Regulations (e.g. AR 600-40 Wearing of Service Uniform), War Department Circulars (e.g. Cir 114 WD 1943), War Department Training Circulars (e.g. TC 52 WD 1942), Surgeon General’s Office Circular Letters (e.g. SGO Cir Ltr 136, 1943), Tactical & Technical Trends (e.g. Tactical & Technical Trends No. 26), a number of Training Films (e.g. TF 3-216 Adjustment of the Service Gas Mask), Film Bulletins (e.g. FB 28 Decontamination of Combat Vehicles), and Film Strips (e.g. FS 8-69 First Aid for Combat Injuries) were also made available.

130th Evacuation Hospital personnel training with a CG-4A Glider, evaluating load and equipment drill for a 1/4-ton truck, aka Jeep. Photo taken at Camp Mackall, Hoffman, North Carolina.

An Air-Ground Demonstration was held on 6 June 1944 to provide actual experience in the identification of American aircraft and an understanding of the important part air support played in ground operations. Lt. General Lesley J. McNair (CG > Army Ground Forces, born 25 May 1883, killed by accidental Allied bombing in Normandy, during “Operation Cobra”, on 25 July 1944 –ed) visited the Hospital on 9 June 1944 and attended a class in heavy tent pitching.
All members of the unit went through the day and night Infiltration Courses on 24 July 1944.

More intensive unit training began on 23 August 1944 and was planned for each Section of the Hospital in such a way as to provide for the rotation of duties within Sections. Enlisted Men were sent to Medical and Surgical Technicians Schools and other specialist courses. Subjects included a large variety such as: Medical, Surgical, Laboratory, X-Ray, Pharmacy, Motor Mechanics, Cooking, Bakery, etc. During this phase of training, the unit was active in the field, developing proficiency in pitching and striking heavy ward tents, becoming familiar with equipment, and perfecting a Standard Operating Procedure for each Section.

Headquarters & Major Staff Officers – 130th Evacuation Hospital
Colonel Robert L. Callison, MC > Commanding Officer
Lt. Colonel John G. Baxter, MC > Chief Medical Service
Major Oscar R. Brown, MAC > Executive Officer
Major Charles B. Roesch, MC > Chief Surgical Service
Major Donald H. Vollmer, MC > Receiving & Evacuation Officer
Captain Margaret L. Benson, ANC > Chief Nurse
Captain Gerald A. Galvin, MC > Chief Laboratory Service
Captain Junius M. Lemmon, MC > Chief X-Ray Service
Captain James F. MacDonald, MC > Gas Officer
Captain Floyd R. Merrill, ChC > Chaplain
Captain Edward H. Spencer, MAC > Registrar
Captain Herman Stolier, MAC > Detachment Commander
1st Lieutenant Bertha M. Bienlein, ANC > Assistant Chief Nurse
1st Lieutenant Joseph J. Dooda, MAC > Motor Officer
1st Lieutenant Martin Grossman, MAC > Supply Officer
1st Lieutenant Jacob L. Siegel, MAC > Adjutant
2d Lieutenant Anthony F. Page, MAC > Mess Officer

Information was received early in September that the 130th Evac Hosp had been selected to participate in Airborne Training and Maneuvers at the Airborne Center, Camp Mackall, Hoffman, North Carolina. The unit departed by motor convoy complete with personnel and equipment 12 September for three weeks of training. The first week was occupied with all members receiving instruction and experience in tying knots and loading C-47 and CG-4A mock ups with all organizational equipment. This training was in preparation for the unit’s participation in support of the 13th Airborne Division in maneuvers. All Sections of the organization computed C-47 loads for every possible item of their equipment and planned a system whereby the Hospital, complete with tentage and equipment, could be transported from a landing strip to the hospital site, only using ¼-ton trucks (i.e. jeeps) and 1-ton trailers, flown in with the remainder of the equipment and personnel. The unit was divided into two serials for flights; with the first making a C-47 practice flight from Mackall Field to Knollwood Army Air Field (USAAF Communications & Training Base also located in North Carolina –ed) on 19 September. Actual participation began on 25 September when the first and second serials were flown from Lumberton Army Air Base to Mackall Field, after the latter had been “captured” from a simulated enemy by 13th Airborne elements. The first serial upon its arrival set up a portion of the Hospital and was ready to receive patients promptly. The rest of the equipment and the remaining personnel arrived a few hours later as a second serial. The unit was released from Airborne Maneuvers on 30 September 1944 and returned to its station the same day. At the time, this was the first Evacuation Hospital to accomplish a movement completely by air, involving a total of 55 C-47 cargo planes for the two-serial move.

Picture of the British transport “Dominion Monarch” which carried the 130th Evacuation Hospital overseas. She left New York Port of Embarkation 8 December 1944 for the United Kingdom.

The last phase of Field Training was held between 15 October and 20 October 1944, and included bivouacking near Camden, in South Carolina. The unit was tested on its unit training, its ability to move quickly and establish station under total blackout conditions, and on its members’ Military Occupational Specialties (MOS).

POM – Preparation for Overseas Movement:

On 23 October 1944, the unit began waterproofing, packing, and crating of organizational equipment in preparation for overseas movement. The next month, personnel were given a week of familiarization with arms: the M-1 .30 caliber Carbine, the M-1 .30 caliber Semi-Automatic Rifle, and the .45 caliber M1911A1 Automatic Pistol. Everyone fired familiarization courses the last two days of the week. Men were given the Air-Ground Test, the Combat Intelligence Test, and the Physical Fitness Test; all were passed with satisfaction.

More Officers and Nurses to bring the unit to its authorized strength were assigned during October and November 1944, and were prepared for overseas shipment.

The 130th Evacuation Hospital with its full complement of Officers, Nurses, and Enlisted Men, departed for overseas service from New York Port of Embarkation (New York POE), 8 December 1944 aboard the “Dominion Monarch”, a British-flag troopship (ex-luxury liner, built in 1938, requisitioned by the British Government in 1940, refitted with 3,556 berths, and used for carrying American and British troops during WW2 –ed).

United Kingdom:

After reaching Southampton in the United Kingdom around mid-December 1944, the unit was transported by rail to a coastal village near Tenby, Pembrokeshire, West South Wales (other American units previously stationed in Tenby belonged to the 2d and 28th Infantry Divisions –ed) where it was placed under the jurisdiction of Headquarters, United Kingdom Base, Western District, and later assigned to XXIII Corps for administration. The men and women were quartered in cantonment type huts and in metal Nissen huts. Water supply at the station was tested and found to be satisfactory, but during a heavy freeze a water in the main broke, necessitating chlorination of the water for quite a period of time. The camp was provided with a workable shower house. For laundry everyone had to rely upon their own initiative (no civilian laundry service available at this early time). On the continent, water was obtained from Engineer water points and the unit’s portable shower apparatus and disinfector were used to provide shower facilities wherever approved civilian arrangements could not be made. While awaiting continental duty at its station “Penally Camp”, a program of refresher training in medical and technical subjects was elaborated and the greater part of the professional personnel was placed on DS with various Hospital Centers throughout England and Wales. As civilian laundry service was still required, it was eventually contracted locally. Passes were frequent when service allowed them, and personnel used them for visiting the many scenic and historic places throughout England, Scotland, and Wales.
During the winter months of 1944-45, and early spring of 1945, while the unit was awaiting transfer to the continent, Hospital personnel received much valuable training with combat wounded in several hospitals located in the United Kingdom, as well as physical conditioning.

Military personnel in front of one the modified and winterized Squad tents at Camp “Twenty Grand”, one of the numerous Cigarette Camps around Le Havre, France. This was the 130th Evacuation Hospital’s staging area prior to moving on to Germany.

The standard issue of equipment for the Evacuation Hospital was used through the unit’s operation overseas, but was supplemented in many cases, especially in the Ward and Surgical Sections by improvised appliances, and somewhat less frequently (in France and Germany –ed) by captured German medical and surgical supplies. Wherever possible, captured enemy equipment was used to supplement or even replace organizational impedimenta, provided identical results could be obtained. For the many changes of station, the organization employed its own transportation in the echelon or shuttle system of organic movement, supplemented by Third Army transportation pool facilities (frequently used in Germany –ed) in order to expedite the movement.

United Kingdom Stations – 130th Evacuation Hospital (SM)
Tenby, Pembrokeshire, England – 15 December 1944 > 12 March 1945

During its operation, and at stations in the United Kingdom and continental Europe, rations were of the A variety, with C and K rations used extensively during administrative and tactical moves. In the UK, sewage and waste disposal were handled by civilian contractors. On the continent, standard garbage and latrine pits were provided for proper waste disposal, and fly traps, insect repellents, and mosquito control measures were employed whenever necessary.
During its entire overseas period, consistent emphasis was placed on VD. Posters on Venereal Disease were displayed throughout the area occupied by the unit, and no man was permitted to go on pass or furlough without obtaining prophylactic material. The Hospital’s Dispensary operated day and night and the EM were informed of the locations of the Pro-Stations nearby.

In Transit on the Continent:

The organization departed from Tenby, Wales, by rail for the Marshalling Area 12 March 1945, from where it embarked for the continent 13 March, landing at Le Havre, France on 14 March 1945. It was then transported by troop ferry up the Seine River to Duclair, France, where the unit disembarked and proceeded by foot to the Staging Area at “Camp Twenty Grand” (one of the Cigarette Camps located in the vicinity of Hénouville/Duclair, France –ed). The Nurses were transferred by motor convoy to a nearby empty school. After arrival, the Hospital personnel were issued additional clothing and individual equipment. The 130th Evac Hosp was assigned to the Fifteenth United States Army (activated 14 August 1944, and only semi-operational since 24 November 1944 –ed) and departed by motor truck for the town of Sedan, France on 21 March 1945. While in Sedan, all Sections of the 130th Evacuation Hospital combat-processed their equipment and computed compact loads in order to minimize trucking space, and made final preparations for commitment to field operations and combat. After these preparations, the unit was inspected in the field by a team from Headquarters, Fifteenth US Army.
The 130th Evac was initially held in reserve at Sedan for an airborne operation which was subsequently cancelled (“Operation Effective” was designed to land the 13th Airborne Division south of Stuttgart, Germany, seize a nearby airfield and create an airhead for further forces to land, the operation orginally scheduled for 22 April was cancelled on 18 April 1945 due to Allied units encircling the Black Forest region and making it completely unnecessary –ed). The unit was then released from assignment and attached to General George S. Patton’s Third United States Army (activated 31 December 1943, and operational on the continent since 1 August 1944 –ed) 12 April 1945, with which it would move to Germany.

Entrance and sign of “Stalag VII-A” north of Moosburg, Nazi Germany’s largest enclosure (86 acres) holding Allied Prisoners of War. At the time of its liberation 29 April 1945 there were still approximately 80,000 prisoners in the camp.

France Stations – 130th Evacuation Hospital (SM)
“Camp Twenty Grand”, Le Havre, France – 15 March 1945 > 21 March 1945
Sedan, France – 21 March 1945 > 19 April 1945

Germany & Austria:

The 130th EH left Sedan, France, by motor convoy and arrived at Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, 21 April 1945. Upon arrival, further preparations for combat were made by the different sections of the Hospital, and liaison established with Headquarters, Third US Army.
Orders were received for the unit to proceed to Nürnberg, Germany (the city where the NSDAP held its annual rallies –ed), on 29 April 1945 in two echelons. After arrival staff and personnel bivouacked on the edge of the city while being held in reserve, and experienced, for the first time, the presence of enemy planes overhead. The war was still on.

Locations & Effective Strength – 130th Evacuation Hospital (SM) APO 403

(period 21 April – 28 April 1945)
Location: Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, strength: 32 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 39 Nurses, 206 EM
(period 30 April – 4 May 1945)
Location: Moosburg, Germany, strength: 33 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 38 Nurses, 206 EM,
1 Officer replacement received
(period 5 May – 12 May 1945)
Location: Moosburg, Germany, strength: 33 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 38 Nurses, 202 EM, 2 American Red Cross
(period: 15 May – 19 May 1945)
Location: Mauthausen, Austria, strength: 34 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 38 Nurses, 206 EM, 2 American Red Cross, 8 Officer replacements received
(period: 19 May – 26 May 1945)
Location: Mauthausen, Austria, strength: 33 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 37 Nurses, 206 EM, 2 American Red Cross
(period: 26 May – 2 June 1945)
Location: Mauthausen, Austria, strength: 33 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 38 Nurses, 205 EM, 2 American Red Cross
(period: 2 June – 9 June 1945)
Location: Mauthausen, Austria, strength: 33 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 38 Nurses, 200 EM, 2 American Red Cross
(period: 9 June – 16 June 1945)
Location: Mauthausen, Austria, strength: 33 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 40 Nurses, 208 EM, 2 American Red Cross, 2 ANC Officer replacements + 4 Enlisted Men replacements received

“Old Glory” flies over Stalag VII-A after its capture by troops of the 14th Armored Division. The 130th Evacuation Hospital remained at this station from 2 May until 13 May 1945.

The 130th Evac was to establish its initial operational site about 1½ miles northwest of Moosburg, Germany, on 2 May 1945, at 1400 hours, however, advance elements were already on site by 29 April. The organization’s initial assignment was hospitalization of Recovered Allied Military Personnel – RAMPs.

Marching orders were received to move further to Moosburg, Germany on 30 April. It was at Moosburg that the 130th Evacuation Hospital became fully operational, starting 2 May 1945. The organization traveled to its new location by infiltration, advancing down the spearhead established by CCA of the 14th Armored Division which had just uncovered and liberated a large German Prisoner of War Camp (Stalag VII A, liberated 29 April 1945, by C Co, 68th Armd Inf Bn –ed), in this town, containing many American and Allied military personnel in urgent need of medical care and hospitalization, both because of inadequately treated battle wounds and injuries, illnesses incurred during imprisonment, and malnutrition. The 130th reached Moosburg 30 April 1945 at 1500 hours, spent the remainder of the day including 1 May 1945 with erection and furnishing of hospital facilities, officially opening for reception of patients at 1400 hours, the next day. The Hospital was opened by VOCG, Third United States Army, and immediately set up to admit American and other Allied military personnel (first day admissions for 3 May 1945, totaled 289, of which 7 were recent battle casualties resulting from operations while crossing the Isar River and the immediate vicinity thereof –ed). They received emergency treatment and were prepared for evacuation and transfer to the 58th Field Hospital, a holding unit situated near the important rail junction and air strip at Landshut, whence they were flown out to the Communication Zone.
Evacuation of patients at the Moosburg PW Camp was handled by the 471st Motor Ambulance Company, which transferred them to the 58th Field Hospital for subsequent air evacuation. While operating at Moosburg a separate Quartermaster Laundry Company was attached to the unit and provided laundry service to the unit (it unfortunately departed ComZ to await redeployment when the 130th Evac Hosp was established at Mauthausen –ed). A small detail of Officers and EM supervised the renovation and rehabilitation of the medical installations inside the camp stockade, where Eastern European PWs were cared for with help from liberated Medical Officers of their own nationalities. A total of 706 RAMPs (majority American, British, and French PWs -ed) were admitted to the tented hospital at this location in addition to approximately 3,000 patients who were treated inside the camp itself. While operating at Moosburg, local civilians were employed for KP and sanitary details, and 2 ARC volunteer workers joined the unit.

Left: ex-KZ Mauthausen inmates, free at last, talk to their Liberators. Photo probably taken shortly following the camp’s liberation by the 11th Armored Division 5 May 1945. 
Center: KZ Mauthausen: a Medical Officer of the 130th Evacuation Hospital assists a starved Hungarian woman in need of help. 
Right: Piles of dead inmates at KZ Mauthausen after having been collected and grouped by requisitioned German civilians in preparation for a mass grave.

RAMP Patients received from Stalag VII-A, Moosburg, Germany

213 Americans
184 British
82 French
15 Russians
8 South African
7 Canadian
5 Poles
4 Belgians
3 Australians
2 Yugoslavians
1 Dutch
1 Greek
1 Italian
52 recorded, but undefined

(apart from the above recovered Allied PWs, 480 American battle casualties were admitted for treatment at the Hospital).

Common respiratory diseases furnished the largest cause for hospitalization (76); then followed in order: non-battle injuries (59); pneumonia (34); tuberculosis (32); diphtheria (24); severe malnutrition (13); hepatitis (12); and recent battle casualties (11). Malnutrition was apparent in all RAMP personnel, particularly in those who had been imprisoned for long periods.

On 13 May the 130th Evacuation Hospital closed station, and the remaining 86 patients were evacuated to the 659th Medical Clearing Company for further care.

KZ Mauthausen, Austria, Prisoners pull down German eagle with swastika at the entrance of the Concentration Camp, 6 May 1945.

KZ Mauthausen, Austria, Prisoners pull down German eagle with swastika at the entrance of the Concentration Camp, 6 May 1945.

On 14 May 1945, the Hospital effectively closed for operations, evacuated its patients, and loaded equipment on trucks. The organization had received instructions to move to KZ-Mauthausen, Austria, (liberated 5 May 1945, by elements of 41st Cav Rcn Sq –ed) southeast of Linz, on the north side of the Danube, where a German Concentration Camp had recently been liberated by elements of the 11th Armored Division with as primary assignment, the hospitalization of Displaced civilian personnel and Political Prisoners. At this new station, located on a hill near Mauthausen, where the unit arrived on 15 May 1945, the 130th was to undertake hospitalization of the inmates of the concentration camp in two phases; first provide for the hospitalization of most non-transportable surgical cases in the “Revier” (hospital), and afterwards organize the transfer of the greater part of the medical cases to the tented area operated by the Medical and Ward Sections. The X-Ray and Laboratory Sections were divided to provide services for both the main hospital and the annex under tentage. Caring implied providing and supplying clothing, blankets, tentage, folding cots, washing facilities, bedpans, urinals, latrines, and food. In some instances and to supplement the own medical supplies, selected captured German drugs and dressings were made available for use, and used with discretion in the treatment of Political Prisoners and Displaced Persons.
The Advance Party of the 130th arrived at KZ-Mauthausen 15 May 1945, where they were to eventually work along the 131st Evacuation Hospital (SM) which was taking care of 3,496 patients since 9 May 1945.  

Aerial view of Camp “Philadelphia”, Assembly Area for possible Redeployment to the Pacific Theater, either via the Zone of Interior, or directly to the Pacific region. The 130th Evacuation Hospital remained in this camp (one of the many City Camps situated in the Reims area, France) for processing until moving to its final staging area at Camp “Lucky Strike”, for return to the United States.

The problem of caring for the tremendous influx of patients rapidly became more complicated from a personnel angle. The five-fold overexpansion in addition to the multiple operations, such as housing the men’s facilities under tentage; establishing women’s facilities in the former SS-barracks, and the overflow of the different men’s wards in the old Russian Lager placed a severe drain on the available personnel. The former SS-garrison shower room was used to great advantage by all members of the command. Personnel shortage could only be solved by employment of civilians, German PWs, volunteer ANC Officers, and German Wehrmacht Nurses.
The true horror of an extermination camp came to light, with gas chamber, crematories, mass graves, very poor living conditions, where brutality and murder had been practiced in every conceivable form. The patients were all Political Prisoners of every possible nationality, but preponderantly Poles. The Hospital’s facilities were expanded to accommodate 1,000 male medical patients in tents outside the camp perimeter and additional facilities were prepared inside the camp to house over another 1,000 surgical and medical female cases. 460 patients were admitted on 18 May, with the highest census being recorded on 21 May, when 1,945 patients were hospitalized. The greatest number of patients seemed to be of Polish origin, next came Russians, both civilians and military, followed by French, Hungarian, Italian, Yugoslav, Czechoslovak, Spanish, Belgian, Dutch, and Greek prisoners. For the most part the inmates were suffering from starvation, hard labor, inhumane treatment, complications of other diseases, and many were to some extent tubercular. The labor involved in preparing for receiving and treating this large number of patients in a very short time was prodigious, and was only accomplished by the cooperation and self sacrifice of all members of the Hospital. Between 2 and 9 June, the 610th Medical Clearing Company was attached to the 130th Evacuation Hospital, adding its 10 Officers and 99 Enlisted personnel to the organization. Total admissions during the described period numbered 2,901, with 220 deaths, and 676 people being discharged.

A daily average of a 100 German PWs worked in cleaning, sanitary, and mess details in support of the unit’s personnel. They were obtained daily from PW Enclosures near Linz and supplemented by local civilians, and German Wehrmacht Nurses. Evacuation of Political Prisoners and DPs (Displaced Persons) from the 130th Evac at Mauthausen after discharge, was handled by the US Military Government and the 11th Armored and 65th Infantry Divisions, with transportation provided by TUSA.

On 15 May 1945, the movement of the 130th Evacuation Hospital to KZ-Mauthausen expanded accommodations for a 1,000 male patients in tents outside the main Lager and the treatment–in camp of another 1,000 female and surgical patients. The general condition of the patients (read inmates) was described as: advanced stages of starvation, severe diarrhea, and Tuberculosis being the most prevalent. A patient census cited treatment of 2,901 admissions during the period 17 May – 15 June 1945 and provided a breakdown by nationality, diagnosis, and outcome, as well as recording 365 deaths (ref. US Army Reference Information Paper 115).

Displaced Persons seemed to be everywhere in Germany, it looked like a migration of liberated people trying to leave a hateful country that had kept them prisoners for so many years. These men,  women, and youngsters came from almost every conquered nation in Europe, among them volunteers, conscripts, and slaves. In some cases civilian and military prisoners were often mixed together, as some Allied PWs had been compelled to labor as well. Dealing with and caring for so many malnourished and sick patients proved a very difficult task and medical organizations often turned to doctors and people with a medical background among the DPs. Some patients were even moved to German hospitals. As the number of hospitals for PWs and American military diminished, those for Displaced Persons increased, soon reaching a total of 22 in the Third Army area alone. Depleted manpower made consolidation of patients and the discharge of as many as possible to their own countries desirable. An international organization, designated the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA –ed) started drawing plans to assume control of the remaining DP Hospitals in Germany. Even with the advent of promised UNRRA help (promised for fall of 1945 – ed), the Allies became Occupation Forces responsible for defined Zones of Occupation, and thus were in charge of the numerous DP, RAMP, and PW Hospitals in their specific areas and for medical care of the camps.

Troopship returns home with personnel of the 130th Evacuation Hospital. Illustration showing USAT “John Ericsson” nearing the pier and ready to  berth, New York Port of Embarkation, ZI.

During its operation at Mauthausen, Austria, information was received that the organization had been placed in Category II for Redeployment to the Pacific Theater by way of the United States. Consequently all remaining patients were transferred to the 59th Field Hospital on 15 June 1945, of which an Advance Party had arrived at Mauthausen 13 June 1945 (elements pertaining to the 59th Field Hospital and the 616th Medical Clearing Company were to relieve the 131st Evacuation Hospital which closed for operations 16 June 1945 –ed). The 59th Field Hospital indeed took over operations from the 130th and 131st Evacuation Hospitals and eventually established three hospital units to provide medical care for the DPs remaining in the vicinity of Mauthausen and Gusen I. Their objective was to prepare as many patients as possible for a rapid repatriation! They were supported by the 610th Medical Clearing Company which remained with them until 20 June 1945.

Shortly after the closing of the Hospital at Mauthausen, many of the unit’s personnel made boat excursions on the Danube River, and trips to Hitler’s mountain retreat at Berchtesgaden. Both the Chaplain’s Office and the Special Services Officer provided many forms of recreation and entertainment for the unit after those horrible experiences. Among these were an adequately stocked library, basket ball, soft ball, and volleyball equipment, a loudspeaker system with recorded music, news, and announcements, and motion pictures. All these measures, to a large extent, contributed to the improvement of efficiency and morale of the 130th Evacuation Hospital.

Meritorious Service Awards – 130th Evacuation Hospital (SM)

Bronze Star Medals were awarded to Lt. Colonel John G. Baxter, Major Chester H. Allen, Major Charles B. Roesch, First Sergeant Willis R. Wood, Staff Sergeant Kenneth D. Caplener, Staff Sergeant Earl Wiggins, and Private First Class Russell C. Everson, for extraordinary and meritorious service to the unit at Mauthausen, Austria, by General Orders # 49, Headquarters XII Corps, dated 14 July 1945. The splendid service rendered by these men, and by all the other members of the 130th Evacuation Hospital attests to the high spirit of cooperation, and unselfish devotion to duty which they possessed.

Back to France:

Personnel departed from Enns, Austria, moving to “Camp Philadelphia” (one of the numerous City Camps –ed), in the Reims Assembly Area by rail on 22 June, the equipment having been previously dispatched by motor convoy. After reaching Camp Philadelphia on 25 June 1945, equipment other than minimum essential was turned into the appropriate Medical, Engineer, and Quartermaster Depots, and personnel were processed for overseas movement to the Zone of Interior.   
Upon completion of these last activities, movement to the Staging Area was made by rail, the Nurses going to “Camp Twenty Grand”, and male personnel being directed to “Camp Lucky Strike” (both so-called Cigarette Camps located around Le Havre, France –ed), to await shipment home.

Personnel Roster (1945):

Hospital Headquarters
Colonel Robert L. Callison, MC – Commanding Officer
Major Oscar R. Brown, MAC – Executive Officer
Captain Margaret L. Benson, ANC – Chief Nurse
1st Lieutenant Bertha M. Bienlein, ANC – Assistant Chief Nurse
1st Lieutenant Jacob L. Siegel, MAC – Adjutant
Captain Floyd R. Merrill, ChC – Chaplain
Master Sergeant Edmund W. Fetter – Sergeant-Major
Technical Sergeant Cloice M. Burrell – Chief Clerk
Staff Sergeant Charles H. Bradshaw – Stenographer
Technician 4th Grade Marion A. Archer – Postal Clerk
Technician 4th Grade Junius S. Dean – Orderly
Technician 4th Grade Charles Flannelly – General Clerk
Technician 4th Grade Carroll S. Pecor – Postal Clerk
Technician 4th Grade Rolf M. Wallerstein – General Clerk
Technician 5th Grade Viborg S. Dak – Orderly
Technician 5th Grade Frank E. Locke – Chaplain’s Assistant

Picture of Colonel Robert L. Callison, Commanding Officer, 130th Evacuation Hospital. Courtesy Marilyn D. White.

Registrar Section
Captain Edward H. Spencer, MAC – Registrar
Chief Warrant Officer Foy K. Heath – Commanding Officer Detachment of Patients
Technical Sergeant Elston L. Flohr – Chief Clerk
Technician 4th Grade Benjamin H. Bruce – Clerk Typist
Technician 4th Grade Douglas W. McInnis – Clerk Typist
Technician 5th Grade Harry Stutman – General Clerk

Receiving & Evacuation Sections
Major Donald H. Vollmer, MC – Receiving & Evacuation Officer
1st Lieutenant Madge G. White, ANC – General Duty Nurse
2d Lieutenant Helen F. Lehman ANC – General Duty Nurse
Staff Sergeant George E. Bates – Section Chief
Technician 4th Grade Wilbur L. Salter – General Clerk
Technician 5th Grade O.D. Hollingsworth – General Clerk
Technician 5th Grade Charles Neigh – Clerk Typist
Private First Class Murray Bebee – Litter Bearer
Private First Class Forrest W. Martin – Litter Bearer
Private First Class Ralph W. Miller – Clerk Typist
Private First Class Louis J. Sapia – Litter Bearer
Private First Class Lawrence S. Staup – Litter Bearer

Detachment of Patients Headquarters
Captain Herman Stolier, MAC – Detachment Commanding Officer
First Sergeant Willis R. Wood – First Sergeant
Staff Sergeant August Demask – Unit Mess Sergeant
Staff Sergeant Max Falkovitch – Unit Supply Sergeant
Technician 4th Grade Raymond C. Connor – Company Clerk
Technician 4th Grade Robert J. Harden – First Cook
Technician 4th Grade Sylvester A. Kraft – First Cook
Technician 4th Grade Leo H. Schmitz – First Cook
Technician 5th Grade Charles H. Coffey – Medical Soldier
Technician 5th Grade Victor L. Conley – Second Cook
Technician 5th Grade Alvin Crick – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Clinton K. Grimsley – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Clarence B. Desersa – Second Cook
Technician 5th Grade James F. Hickman – Second Cook
Technician 5th Grade Joe I. Shafer – Driver
Private First Class Nils E. Akerblom – Cooks Helper
Private First Class Edwin Bansomer – Medical Soldier
Private First Class Curtis L. Busby – Cooks Helper
Private First Class Peter DiMarco – Medical Soldier
Private First Class Watson J. Duhon – Medical Soldier
Private First Class Crawford W. Ellerbee – Cooks Helper
Private First Class James H. Gardner – Medical Soldier
Private First Class Tracy Guin – Cooks Helper
Private First Class Wilbur C. Hoerr – Medical Soldier
Private First Class Henry Istre – Cooks Helper
Private First Class Emil V. Kendall – Cooks Helper
Private First Class Gus Mantia – Medical Soldier
Private First Class Lyle V. Newell – Medical Soldier
Private First Class Carmelo C. Spitaleri – Medical Soldier
Private First Class Percy C. Tarver – Medical Soldier
Private First Class John D. Warren, Sr. – Medical Soldier

From L to R: Picture of 1st Lieutenant Betty J. Flanagan in white dress uniform before leaving for the European Theater; 1st Lieutenant Betty J. Flanagan, ANC, at Moosburg, Stalag VII-A, Germany, May 1945; group picture of ANC Officers, with 1st Lt. Betty J. Flanagan, bottom row, far right, taken while stationed near Moosburg, 16 May 1945; another picture of 1st Lieutenant Betty J. Flanagan in front of KZ Mauthausen, Austria, around May-June 1945. All pictures courtesy Anne M. Kutchmire.

From L to R: Picture of 1st Lieutenant Betty J. Flanagan in white dress uniform before leaving for the European Theater; 1st Lieutenant Betty J. Flanagan, ANC, at Moosburg, Stalag VII-A, Germany, May 1945; group picture of ANC Officers, with 1st Lt. Betty J. Flanagan, bottom row, far right, taken while stationed near Moosburg, 16 May 1945; another picture of 1st Lieutenant Betty J. Flanagan in front of KZ Mauthausen, Austria, around May-June 1945. All pictures courtesy Anne M. Kutchmire.

Transportation & Maintenance Section
1st Lieutenant Joseph J. Dooda, MAC – Motor Officer
Staff Sergeant Michael A. Killinger – Motor Sergeant
Technician 4th Grade James J. Burke – Mechanic
Technician 4th Grade William A. Hanger – Mechanic
Technician 5th Grade Frank Anders – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Henry E. Bailey – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Herald O. Bass – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Joseph E. Dolan – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Ralph R. Drake – Driver
Technician 5th Grade William H. Easterwood – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Vernon L. Holsbrook – Driver
Technician 5th Grade James A. Johns – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Archie Lee – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Leclare E. Lee – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Gilfred D. Lindup – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Marvin E. Mattson – Driver
Technician 5th Grade James E. Melloway – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Charles M. Phillips – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Earl H. Rutz – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Loren T. P. Snead – Driver
Technician 5th Grade Harris J. Veade – Driver
Private William O. Donald – Driver

Supply & Utilities Section
1st Lieutenant Martin Grossman MAC – Supply Officer
Technical Sergeant John S. Sadowski – Medical Supply Sergeant
Staff Sergeant Francis J. Manley – Medical Supply Noncommissioned Officer
Sergeant William M. Gehr – Utilities Sergeant
Technician 4th Grade Walter R. Fonda – General Repairman
Technician 5th Grade Harry V. Empting – Electrician
Technician 5th Grade Jessie Grantham – General Operator
Technician 5th Grade Durward H. Hines – Sanitary Technician
Technician 5th Grade Robert M. Ross – Stock Clerk
Private First Class Richard Miller – Sanitary Technician
Private John C. McMullin – General Clerk

Mess Section
2d Lieutenant Anthony F. Page, MAC – Mess Officer
Staff Sergeant Earl Wiggins – Mess Sergeant
Sergeant Alexis Sokolowicz – Mess Supply Sergeant
Technician 4th Grade Norman G. Bisanz – First Cook
Technician 4th Grade Lewis A. Clark – First Cook
Technician 4th Grade Clifford H. Kirchner – First Cook
Technician 4th Grade Glenn C. Koehn – First Cook
Technician 5th Grade James O. Adams – Baker
Technician 5th Grade Lionel T. Colteux – Second Cook
Technician 5th Grade Harold D. Marshall – Second Cook
Technician 5th Grade Herbert Miller – Second Cook
Technician 5th Grade Lewis H. Simmons – Butcher
Technician 5th Grade Forrest A. Tyson – Second Cook
Private First Class Claude E. Barnes – Cooks Helper
Private First Class Alfred G. Christopherson – Cooks Helper
Private First Class Robert J. Friese – Cooks Helper
Private First Class Frederick D. McIver – Cooks Helper
Private First Class Hollis M. White – Cooks Helper

Group of ANC Officers of the 130th Evacuation Hospital. Courtesy Marilyn D. White.

Ward Section
Lt. Colonel John G. Baxter, MC – Chief Medical Service
Major Chester H. Allen, MC – Chief Internist
Captain Archibald G. Fletcher, Jr., MC – Medical Officer
Captain John R. Hall, MC – Medical Officer
Captain Robert Lippert, MC – Neuropsychiatrist
Captain Frederick J. Loomis, MC – Medical Officer
Captain James F. MacDonald, MC – Medical Gas Officer
Captain Thomas Seidman, MC – Medical Officer
1st Lieutenant Edith H. Bauer, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Helen H. Becker, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Alma G. Day, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Doris M. Eastwood, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Mimi Finnerty, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Mary Q. Fitchhorn, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Irene F. Flanagan, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Nellie H. Gryk, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Emma Havasy, ANC – Chief Ward Nurse
1st Lieutenant Julia F. Holt, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Mary J. Jarosz, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Corinne W. Karrasch, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Sylvia Light, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Mae Lopatin, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Helene V. Nielson, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Catherine M. Ruppert, ANC – General Duty Nurse
1st Lieutenant Helen H. Strobel, ANC – Neuropsychiatrist
1st Lieutenant Charlotte M. Wadleigh, ANC – General Duty Nurse
2d Lieutenant Lily W. Bernard, ANC – General Duty Nurse
2d Lieutenant Mildred A. Holub, ANC – General Duty Nurse
2d Lieutenant Janet H. Splatt, ANC – General Duty Nurse
Staff Sergeant Kenneth D. Caplener – Section Chief
Sergeant Wesley H. Draeger – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Sergeant Jerry Shurling – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Technician 4th Grade Edward J. Dillman – Surgical Technician
Technician 4th Grade Edgar Kiser – Medical Technician
Technician 4th Grade Paul B. Marks – Medical Technician
Technician 4th Grade Wilmon O. Self – Surgical Technician
Technician 4th Grade John S. Thaller – Medical Technician
Corporal Garvin A. Gillespie – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Corporal Lawrence B. Gripka – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Corporal Marvin V. Harrison – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Corporal Eugene W. Jackson – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Corporal Freeman G. Jorgenson- Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Corporal Melvin Lacombe – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Corporal Carlson E. Love – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Corporal James W. Rickert – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Corporal Joseph E. Sedberry – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Technician 5th Grade Donald W. Behm – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Harold W. Brunken – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Saul Dobkin – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Russell C. Everson – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Kingsley F. Harrison – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Gordon L. Jessen – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Edward F. Kirchner – Medical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Neal W. McGehee – Medical Technician
Technician 5th Grade George M. McGlawn – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Libero G. Mondini – Medical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Enrico L. Rinaldo – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade George N. Robinson – Medical Technician
Technician 5th Grade George W. Troy – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Ralph C. Udelhofen – Medical Technician
Technician 5th Grade John S. Wilson – Surgical Technician
Private First Class Grayfer L. Abney – Hospital Orderly
Private First Class Waldon J. Barras – Hospital Orderly
Private First Class John M. Bennett – Surgical Technician
Private First Class O’Neill S. Bernardou – Surgical Technician
Private First Class Michael E. Boehm – Hospital Orderly
Private First Class Frances J. Burchett – Hospital Orderly
Private First Class Gary Dewey – Medical Technician
Private First Class Louis M. Forster – Medical Technician
Private First Class Bearmon P. Heister – Medical Technician
Private First Class Marion J. Hudson – Medical Technician
Private First Class John Hume – Medical Technician
Private First Class John H. Kerr – Medical Technician
Private First Class Fred Kramer – Hospital Orderly
Private First Class Roy C. Lemke – Hospital Orderly
Private First Class Michael F. Mackin – Surgical Technician
Private First Class Gordon MacMillan – Surgical Technician
Private First Class Pierre W. Martin – Medical Technician
Private First Class Harold S. McElroy – Medical Technician
Private First Class Elton W. Meverden – Hospital Orderly
Private First Class Charles S. Pulliam – Bath Attendant
Private First Class Gilbert Rauschenberger – Medical Technician
Private First Class Leo H. Reinke – Surgical Technician
Private First Class George H. Rennich – Surgical Technician
Private First Class Nathaniel Schumer – Surgical Technician
Private First Class Leo W. Scott – Hospital Orderly
Private First Class O. Sistrunk – Bath Attendant
Private First Class Lowell A. Smith – General Clerk
Private First Class Woodrow W. Sweet – Surgical Technician
Private First Class Nicholas A. Terrafranca – Hospital Orderly
Private First Class Bernard J. Thornton – Medical Technician
Private First Class Paul P. Trusik, Jr. – Surgical Technician
Private First Class Harold V. Wilkerson – Surgical Technician
Private First Class Earl F. Wolfe – Medical Technician
Private George S. Amorin – Hospital Orderly
Private James O. Brazzell – Hospital Orderly
Private John W. Cunningham – Hospital Orderly
Private Charles E. Daugherty – Hospital Orderly
Private Emil Duerr – Bath Attendant
Private Ewell H. Guillory – Hospital Orderly
Private Dwight O. Guinn – Hospital Orderly

May 1945. Aerial view of tented hospital area (occupied by the 130th Evacuation Hospital) at Mauthausen, Austria.

Operating Section
Major Charles B. Roesch, MC – Chief Surgical Service
Major James B. Blair, MC – General Surgeon
Major William N. Goldberg, MC – Anesthetist
Major Isaac A. Kawasaki, MC – Orthopedic Surgeon
Major James E. Long, DC – Oral Dental Surgeon
Major Wendell M. Steele, MC – Ophthalmologist
Major Jesse M. Swink, DC – Oral Dental Surgeon
Captain Edwin A. Dilworth, MC – Medical Officer
Captain Thomas J. Dugan, MC – Urologist
Captain Nathaniel R. Hollister, MC – Neurosurgeon
Captain Sam A. Loeb, MC – General Surgeon
Captain Leo Scheckner, MC – Anesthetist
Captain Richard V. Stevenson, MC – Plastic Surgeon
Captain Arthur F. Wright, MC – General Surgeon
Captain Arthur L. Robichaux, DC – General Dentist
1st Lieutenant Florence J. Allen, ANC – General Duty & Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Erma T. Andrews, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Violet P. Brooks, ANC – General Duty & Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Betty J. Flanagan, ANC – General Duty & Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Ida C. Funkhauser, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Marjorie E. H. Howard, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Stella Kazmierczak, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Marie E. Knowles, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Maryanna P. MacIntosh, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Edna Mae McMurray, ANC – Anesthetist
1st Lieutenant Bernadine M. Meehan, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Margaret L. Owens, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Mildred V. Sybeldon, ANC – Anesthetist
1st Lieutenant Eleanor A. Tourtillot, ANC – Chief Surgical Nurse
1st Lieutenant Stacia V. Urban, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Mabel L. White, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
1st Lieutenant Mary C. Ziegler, ANC – Operating Room Nurse
Staff Sergeant Joseph L. Pistorino – Section Chief
Technician 3d Grade Roy H. Davison – Surgical Technician
Technician 3d Grade Charles H. Friedhof – Surgical Technician
Technician 3d Grade Charles E. Fuson – Surgical Technician
Technician 3d Grade William J. Kilfoile – Surgical Technician
Technician 3d Grade John B. Lewis – Surgical Technician
Technician 3d Grade Joseph J. Porcelli – Surgical Technician
Technician 3d Grade Robert J. Raiman – Surgical Technician
Technician 3d Grade Charles R. Rickard – Surgical Technician
Technician 3d Grade Louis N. Zampino – Surgical Technician
Sergeant Emil R. Bocka – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Sergeant Delbert L. Hartley – Surgical Technician
Sergeant Richard E. Van Bramer – Medical Noncommissioned Officer
Technician 4th Grade Allen H. Kendall – Surgical Technician
Technician 4th Grade Charles E. West – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Harold M. Hagness – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade William J. Hermann – Surgical Technician
Technician 5th Grade Joseph N. Parente – General Clerk
Technician 5th Grade George W. Rounds, Jr. – Dental Technician
Technician 5th Grade Charles H. Starr – Surgical Technician
Private Hervey D. Simard – Dental Technician

Roentgenological Section
Captain Junius M. Lemmon, MC – Radiologist
Staff Sergeant Warren J. Venable – X-Ray Technician
Technician 4th Grade Charles S. Wager – X-Ray Technician
Technician 5th Grade Roland C. Bramlet – X-Ray Technician
Technician 5th Grade Lawrence J. Cleveland – X-Ray Technician

Pharmacy & Laboratory Section
Captain Gerald A. Galvin, MC – Medical Laboratory Officer
Technical Sergeant Leonard J. Russ – Laboratory Technician
Technician 3d Grade Gerald H. Krauss – Laboratory Technician
Technician 3d Grade Benjamin Ratner – Pharmacist
Technician 4th Grade Sidney H. Abramson – Pharmacist
Technician 4th Grade Edward D. Foley – Clerk Typist
Technician 4th Grade Frank J. Riga – Laboratory Technician
Technician 5th Grade Binning P. Chambers – Laboratory Technician
Private First Class Morton P. Epstein – Laboratory Technician

Return to the Zone of Interior:

Shipment arrangements could not be met until 28 July 1945, at which time the complete organization embarked on the USAT “John Ericsson” (ex M/S Kungsholm, requisitioned and purchased for conversion to a troop transport –ed) at Le Havre, France, sailing for New York, where it arrived 6 August 1945. All members were further transferred to Camp Kilmer, Stelton, New Jersey (Staging Area for New York Port of Embarkation –ed), and departed for their homes on 7 August 1945 for 30 days TD at home, with orders to reassemble at Fort Bragg, Fayetteville, North Carolina (Field Artillery Replacement Training Center –ed) during the month of September.
With the announcement of V-J Day (14 August 1945 –ed), plans and preparations for movement to the Pacific were suspended. Additional furloughs were granted, and those members of the unit eligible for Discharge were promptly separated and sent home. The majority of those ineligible for Discharge or with low points were transferred to other medical units.

Remark: Colonel Robert L. Callison, MC, was one of the few Officers who had the privilege of activating the 130th Evacuation Hospital unit, commanding the organization, watching it progress through all its stages of training, successfully perform its mission in combat, and return home with it after victory had been achieved, to the Zone of Interior (-ed).

The 130th Evacuation Hospital, Semimobile, was officially inactivated by the few remaining Officers and Enlisted Men at Fort Bragg, North Carolina (Field Artillery Replacement Training Center –ed), effective 5 November 1945, per Paragraph 1, General Orders Number 67, Twenty-Seventh Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Special Troops, First United States Army, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, dated 30 October 1945. 

Official Campaign Credits – 130th Evacuation Hospital (SM)

Rhineland (15 September 1944 – 21 March 1945)
Central Europe (22 March 1945 – 11 May 1945)

Postwar “Commemorative Plaque for KZ Mauthausen”.


The MRC Staff wish to thank Marilyn D. White, daughter of Private First Class Hollis M. White (ASN:38654096) a member of the 130th Evacuation Hospital, for generously providing them with a complete personnel roster of subject Hospital. Thank you so much.

 

This page was printed from the WW2 US Medical Research Centre on 23rd October 2018 at 16:35.
Read more: https://www.med-dept.com/unit-histories/130th-evacuation-hospital/