136th Station HospitalUnit History

Partial view of Camp Barkeley, Abilene, Texas in 1942. The MRTC was activated 1 November 1941. A second Medical Administrative Officer Candidate School was started 11 April 1942.

Introduction & Activation:

The 136th Station Hospital was officially activated 15 August 1942 at Camp Barkeley, Abilene, Texas (Armored Division Camp, and later Medical Replacement Training Center –ed), per G.O. No. 14. Activation took place after arrival of a cadre consisting of one Officer; Major Stanley S. Tanz, MC, O-330067, and 25 Enlisted Men, all from the Station Hospital at Bolling Field, Army Air Force Base, Washington D.C.

Quarters were initially provided in temporary tentage, subsequently changed to wooden barracks, off the main parade grounds, on or about 7 October 1942. Additional Officer personnel were received as follows: Lt. Colonel Joseph D. Stout, MC, 0-215631, joined 10 October, and assumed command of the unit 12 October 1942. The other Officers (12 MC & DC) joined between 21 October and 6 November 1942, with an additional increment of 104 EM and Technicians assigned between 29 September and 4 November 1942 from William Beaumont General Hospital and MRTC Camp Barkeley, Texas.
The Unit was a 750-bed Zone of Communications Hospital, based on T/O 8-560, War Department, dated 22 July 1942, column #17 (out of 23 columns).

T/O & E 8-560, 750-bed Station Hospital, Communications Zone, dated 22 July 1942
40 Officers
1 Warrant Officer
75 Nurses
392 Enlisted Men
6 ¾-ton Ambulances
1 5-passenger Light Sedan Car
2 ¼-ton Trucks
1 ¾-ton Weapon Carrier
2 1 ½-ton Cargo Trucks
2 2 ½-ton Cargo trucks
1 2 ½-ton Dump Truck
(as per T/O  following civilian personnel were required: 1 Head Dietitian, 2 Dietitians,
1 Head Physical Therapy Aide, 2 Physical Therapy Aides, 2 Seamstresses)

During its early phases of activation at Camp Barkeley, the organization’s training was often interrupted by weekly changes in quarters, necessitated by new construction in the camp. The unit was thus, at various times, quartered in M-1934 pyramid tents, a mess hall, and in wooden cantonments. The latter were properly ventilated and insulated and heated by gas stoves. Because of its small size, the unit’s messing was handled together with the 37th Station Hospital located approximately a half mile from Headquarters. Sanitary facilities, water supply, bathing, laundry, and insect control were rendered by the Station Hospital and were available within the camp area.

Training:

A Training Program in accordance with MTP 8-10 and verbal directives of the CO, 8th Hospital Center, and of the Surgeon, Camp Barkeley, Texas, was inaugurated immediately on activation. Training consisted of lectures, demonstrations, field exercises, and hospital ward and office practice.

Aerial view of barracks at Camp Edwards, Falmouth, Massachusetts. Cp. Edwards was an Antiaircraft Artillery Training Center and apart from its primary function was extensively used as a major training facility in the frame of the overall United States Army mobilization program. It also served as a sending-of point for troops destined for movement overseas.

During the training period, the 136th Station received its first transportation. One staff car, 1 jeep, 1 weapon carrier, 1 cargo truck, and 3 ambulances were put at the unit’s disposal. Much organizational and T/BA equipment was also received based on requisition.

On 1 November 1942, the unit received a warning order for movement on a permanent change of station to Camp Edwards, Falmouth, Massachusetts (Antiaircraft Artillery Training Center –ed). All Enlisted Men were removed from service in the Camp Barkeley Station Hospital, and more Enlisted personnel who had just completed Basic Training joined the unit from MRTC Camp Barkeley, Texas, and William Beaumont General Hospital, Texas.

Change of Station:

On 6 November 1942, it was 1500 hours, the organization left Camp Barkeley and entrained (in Pullman coaches) for Camp Edwards, Massachusetts. An advance party of 7 Officers and 132 Enlisted Men had already left. 8 Officers traveled by private conveyance. The unit reported at Camp Edwards, Falmouth, Massachusetts at 0700 hours, 10 November 1942.

Total personnel of the 136th Station Hospital at the time consisted of 11 Medical Corps Officers – 4 Dental Corps Officers – and 132 Enlisted Men (no Nurses).

On arrival at its new station, the organization was assigned to the Evacuation Hospital Area, which was shared with personnel from the 57th General Hospital. This area, situated near the Camp Station Hospital in the northwest section of the camp, was 6 acres in size and contained 24 wooden buildings covered with tar paper and all heated either by cannon or space heaters utilizing soft coal for fuel. The area taken over was of new construction and entirely undeveloped except for the buildings. It consisted of much low ground with poor drainage which tended to collect rain water in large quantities, remaining muddy for days. Immediate construction of marked cinder walks and outside improvements was started. Tables and benches, not available, had to be specially constructed.
Immediately on arrival, plans and training were initiated for implementation of the MTP 8-10 training schedules in all medical specialties. Officers were assigned as instructors, and first classes were held on 16 November 1942. Many training aids being unavailable, the men had to improvise and build items such as black boards, tables, dental lights, dummy x-ray machines, visual aids, drawings, screens, etc. Unit personnel was augmented with the arrival of 57 more Enlisted Men from various Army Reception Centers; they were assigned to the technical and clerical classes, and immediately started training. Supplementary training was started for the trained elements of the unit, with many being assigned to the Station Hospital for duty in wards. In anticipation of its operational needs, men were further assigned to the personnel office and registrar at the Camp Station Hospital for experience.

A permanent mess was organized and set up the day after arrival at the camp, and while individual mess kits had to be used at the beginning, chinaware was finally furnished by the Camp Quartermaster after 15 November 1942. Food was good, well cooked, and considered to be sufficient in amount and variety. Rations were drawn daily from the camp. Athletic equipment, recreational facilities, etc. were all provided for.
Physical conditioning was emphasized by group calisthenics, drills, and marches. Meanwhile the outlined program of 13 weeks of training was shortened to 11 weeks. On 20 December 1942, after classes were well organized in MTP 8-10 for the EM, the Officers classes were started. No more training equipment shortages occurred. Unit supply functioned smoothly and except for some unobtainable items such as overshoes, no personnel shortages of supplies were encountered.
The unit’s first MTP 8-10 Training Program was progressing smoothly and scheduled to end on 10 February 1943.

View of some enlisted personnel barracks at Camp Shanks, Orangeburg, New York. The installation, spread over 2,000 acres, was one of the Staging Areas for the New York Port of Embarkation. In 1944 it had a troop capacity for 2,545 Officers and 46,367 Enlisted Men.

At years’s end, 31 December 1942, the personnel, still under command of Lt. Colonel Joseph D. Stout, MC, O-215631, consisted of:

13 Medical Officers
4 Dental Corps Officers
6 Medical Administrative Corps Officers
1 Sanitary Corps Officer
2 Corps of Chaplains Officers
191 Enlisted Men
(still no Nurses)

Field exercises were carried out at frequent intervals between November 1942 and July 1943, including pitching of ward tents, pyramid tents, and individual shelter halves, and establishment of overnight bivouacs. Field messing, gas training, protection against air attack, field camouflage, maintenance of supply, principles of dispersion, protective shelter and trench construction, field sanitation, and other subjects were taught during the many field exercises. On top of these came map reading, field orientation, use of compass, carried out for Officers and Noncommissioned Officers. Nothing was forgotten, with additional classes on clerical and administrative duties. Training inspections were regularly conducted by representatives of the First Service Command and Medical Inspectors.

Between end of 1942 and 19 May 1943, additional EM personnel was received from MRTC Camp Barkeley, Abilene, Texas; Camp Grant, Rockford, Illinois; and Camp Picket, Blackstone, Virginia.
The very first increment of Nurses was received on 27 May 1943, including the Principal Chief Nurse and 30 other members of the Army Nurse Corps. Additional ANC Officers were assigned 29 and 30 June 1943, reaching a total of 75 Nurses. One Dietitian and 3 American Red Cross workers reported for duty on 17 July 1943.

On 19 August 1943the aggregate of the 136th Station Hospital personnel read: 41 Officers – 75 Nurses – 1 Dietitian – 3 ARC workers – 383 Enlisted Men (total: 503).

Approximately 1 July 1943, by arrangement with the Camp Edwards Commanding Officer, all personnel, including Officers and Enlisted Men went through the infiltration course under live fire. Gas masks, steel helmets, and light packs were mandatory during this exercise. The obstacle course was used for training by about 50% of the command. Two cadres from the 136th were supplied for the 564th and 608th Medical Hospital Ship Platoons, and a separate cadre for a 750-bed Station Hospital was kept available at all times.

Preparation for Overseas Movement (POM):

Picture of the Manor at Acton Place, Sudbury, England. The Estate grounds became the home of the 136th Station Hospital in World War 2.

In accordance with alert orders received ten days in advance, the unit packed its basic and designated equipment in accordance with lists received from the CO, Port of Embarkation. Non-essential equipment, vehicles, and other equipment were turned back to supply sources.
The 136th Sta Hosp moved to the Staging Area, Port of Embarkation, by train 21 July 1943, clearing Camp Edwards at 0600 hours. The unit arrived at the POE at 1600 hours the same day. The train equipment consisted of 8 passenger coaches and 1 baggage car. Wrapped lunches and purchased ice cream were served en route. The Staging Area comprised 7 wooden barracks, 1 latrine, 1 supply building, and 1 headquarters building. During the period lasting 30 days in which this area was occupied by the unit, extensive rock-bordered paths were constructed, including walks adjacent to the buildings. Officers were quartered in 2 buildings, while all female personnel were housed in a restricted area, approximately 1,000 yards from unit Headquarters. Personnel were re-equipped for overseas, trained, inoculated, identified, and messed under camp control.
All summer clothing was turned in and replaced by wool uniforms, including underwear, and impregnated fatigues. Field ranges gas cans were duly inspected and emptied, then repacked. During its stay at the Staging Area, the organization was provided with 2 command & reconnaissance trucks and 1 jeep. A certain amount of recreation was provided, including athletics and movies. Overnight passes, to the extent of half of the personnel, were used continually.

The command moved by train from its Staging Area (secret), Port of Embarkation (secret), to the dock (secret), by train and ferry, clearing the camp at 2100 hours, 19 August 1943 (Camp Shanks, Orangeburg, New York, Staging Area for the New York Port of Embarkation –ed). Embarkation for overseas took place at 2300 hours, 20 August 1943, and was prompt and without incident.

United Kingdom (1943):

The transport vessel (secret) was occupied by numerous other units, and duration of the voyage was (secret) days. All alarms, alerts, and other training activities were operated by the transport Commander (RMS “Queen Elizabeth” –ed). En route, several entertainments for the benefit of the Enlisted Men were held, both by the ship’s personnel, and by the unit’s personnel. Arrival at destination (secret) in the United Kingdom took place on 27 August 1943.
Debarkation in 2 separate detachments, at (secret) occurred without notable comments at 0800 and 1600 hours respectively. Baggage was unloaded by a transport detail, and forwarded to units at the final destination (secret). The unit entrained immediately and moved to its destination (secret) at approximately 1400 hours, the same day. Movement was uneventful, with one stop for hot food at 0800 hours, 28 August. The organization detrained and was moved a distance of three miles by motor convoy supplied by a nearby Engineer Battalion.

The 136th Station Hospital opened for reception of patients 14 September 1943, at Acton Place, Sudbury, Suffolk, England, APO 589.

Satisfactory quarters for all personnel were available on arrival. Two separate unit messes were opened, including one for Officers and Nurses, and one for Enlisted personnel. Hospital buildings were complete, although the area was still occupied by the British contractor who was completing the construction. The period between arrival – 27 August 1943, and opening of the Hospital – 14 September 1943, was occupied by preparation of the buildings, distribution of the supplies, and in training for operation.
The total area comprised 112 acres, 56 of which were under Hospital control. 28 buildings were available for use as hospital wards, with additional ones in the area reserved for surgery, laboratory, dental clinics, EENT clinic, admission and disposition, ambulance loading, Headquarters, post office, tailor & barber shop, patients’ mess, recreation, theater, PX, and American Red Cross.
Adjacent to the Hospital area, one brick building, capable of housing 50 Nurses and 7 additional TO buildings for Nurses and other female personnel were provided. Other buildings housed the Officers’ club and the Enlisted Men’s mess. 9 additional huts adjacent to the Nurses’ quarters and one large mess hall, designated canteen were also made available. In the Enlisted area, a great total of 33 Nissen huts, each capable of housing 16 EM were provided. 4 more buildings equipped with lavatories, ablution areas, and latrines were situated in the same area.

Layout of the 136th Station Hospital. Original appendix pertaining to the Annual Report covering the period from 1 January to 30 September 1944.

The following Officers were in charge of the different Professional Services at the 136th Station Hospital:

Lt. Colonel Augustus H. Lancaster, MC, O-486636, Chief of Medical Service
Major John J. Brick, MC, O-1691005, Chief of Surgical Service (transferred 8 March 1944)
Major Edgar O’Quinn, DC, O-398146, Chief of Dental Service (transferred 21 April 1944)
Major Ralph D. Richardson, MC, O-1696223, Chief of General Surgery Section
Major Stanley S. Tanz, MC, O-330067, Asst Chief of Orthopedic Section
Major Oscar Glassman, MC, O-494395, Chief of Septic Surgery Section
Major Maurice Colman, MC, O-492842, Chief of Medical Section
Captain Laurence G. Balding, MC, O-475596, Chief of EENT Section
Captain Morris Binder, MC, O-492970, Chief of Neuro-Psychiatric Section
Captain James P. Palmer, Jr., MC, O-257215, Chief of X-Ray Service (transferred 27 September 1944)
Captain Boris P. Petroff, MC, O-329870, Chief of Urological Section (transferred 17 February 1944)
1st Lieutenant John J. Larkin, Jr., MC, O-512392, Chief of Laboratory Service
1st Lieutenant Helen M. Thomae, ANC, N-701793, Chief of Nursing Service

During the period 14 September to 31 December 1943, 2,560 outpatients were given a total of 3,512 treatments and 1,714 cases were admitted to the 136th Sta Hosp. Of this total, 932 patients were surgical cases, including only 23 battle casualties, 14 bicycle accidents, and 30 traffic accidents. 34 major surgical operations were performed. Among the 782 patients admitted for medical service were 32 VD cases.

During this period, 32 air raid alerts occurred, but no bombs were dropped in the immediate area or nearer than a distance of five miles. The attempted target was the USAAF airbase, Chilton Station AAF-174.
Routine training of all personnel, including Officers, Nurses, and Enlisted personnel continued throughout the year, although inclement weather often interfered with outdoor training. Dry runs were regularly scheduled with participation by all departments to constitute a test of reaction and operation during a specific period of 1 ½ to 2 hours while patients were being admitted in rapid succession. Three such exercises were held in 1943. The Commanding Officer, the Heads of Departments, Officers, and Nurses participated in general and specialized conferences, to which nearby-stationed Medical Officers were invited. To keep the men in a good physical shape, PT was provided in the gymnasium two hours daily, and a road march held twice a week.

Relationships between British civilian and military organizations and personnel of this Post were particularly cordial. Receptions were organized with invitation of guests from the civilian community and adjacent British military units and organizations. Many Officers and Enlisted Men were frequently invited for personal visits to the homes of British people. Formal entertainment was afforded the British civilians, including a grand Christmas party for approximately 275 children. Enlisted Men were able to arrange four parties, including three dances, and one vaudeville show. British Medical Officers were invited for lectures, with more exchange lectures arranged. The Hospital staff set up visits to adjacent British military and civilian Hospitals.
Some of the required equipment only arrived piecemeal. The one on hand included 4 Chest, Medical Department, No. 60 with extra instruments, a dental x-ray machine, and the appropriate items to set up a dark room to develop x-ray films. The dental laboratory had meanwhile been equipped to perform denture repair.

Commanding Officers – 136th Station Hospital
Lt. Colonel, Joseph D. Stout, MC, O-215631 (12 Oct 42 > 6 Nov 44) died of natural causes
Lt. Colonel Augustus H. Lancaster, MC, O-486636 (6 Nov 44 > 6 Dec 44)
Colonel George E. Lindow, MC, O-10845 (6 Dec 44 > 5 Aug 45)
Lt. Colonel Walter R. Limbaugh, MC, O-131457 (5 Aug 45 > 28 Sep 45)

United Kingdom (1944):

Booklet published by the 486th Bombardment Group (Heavy) while in the European Theater. The unit’s base, designated AAF-174, was located nearby and was among the list of USAAF units medically supported and serviced by the 136th Station Hospital during its stay in the United Kingdom. 

Staff:
The organization worked under the command of Colonel Joseph D. Stout, MC, O-215631, born 20 November 1886 in Washington, D.C. and called to active duty 5 March 1941 as Lt. Colonel, MI, Chief of Intelligence Section, Army Medical Center, Washington, DC. He was assigned to the 136th Station Hospital on 12 October 1942, and promoted to Colonel on 9 December 1942. Staff activities were coordinated under the direction of Lt. Colonel Jay F. Havice, MC, O-486872, who became the unit’s Executive Officer. Further staff members were Captain Clarence E. McKeown, MAC, O-1541511, Adjutant and S-1 (Head of Personnel Section); Captain John Weber, MAC, O-1543549, S-2 (Head of Military Intelligence Section); 2d Lieutenant Walderman C. Schaufler, MAC, O-1535281, S-3 (Head of Operations & Training Section) replaced by 2d Lieutenant Wolf Levine, MAC, O-1535219, who took over 23 November 1944; Captain William R. Howard, MAC, O-1541572, S-4 (Head of Supply & Evacuation Section) followed by 2d Lieutenant George V. Schlitzer, MAC, O-1546405 from 17 October 1944, and by 1st Lieutenant Morris Lipetz, MAC, O-1542686 from 29 November 1944; Captain Martin J. O’Donnell, ChC, O-499055, Roman Catholic Chaplain. With regard to the list with the Chiefs of Professional Services (see 1943 above), the only changes were those which took place in the Surgical and in the Dental Service, whereby new Chiefs were respectively appointed: Major Ralph D. Richardson, MC, O-1696223 and Major William C. Smedley, DC, O-402461.

Colonel Joseph Duerson Stout died suddenly 6 November 1944 at 1425 hours (cerebral hemorrhage). Funeral services were conducted by Chaplains Martin J. O’Donnell and Gregor W. Kutz, in the Post Chapel on 7 November. Burial services were held at the American Military Cemetery, Cambridge, England on 9 November. A representation of 20 Officers, 18 Nurses, and 60 EM from the organization attended the burial, and in addition COs and representatives of the following units were present:

Colonel H. F. Macklin, MC – 49th Station Hospital
Colonel G. A. Clapp, MC – 65th General Hospital
Lt. Colonel W. D. Spearman, MC – 115th General Hospital
Lt. Colonel J. J. Hornisher, MC – 116th General Hospital
Colonel G. A. Thatcher, MC – 121st Station Hospital
Lt. Colonel E. McCann, MC – 162d General Hospital
Lt. Colonel J. R. Daly, MC – 163d General Hospital
Colonel D. J. Berry – 184th General Hospital
Colonel L. M. Gable, MC – 231st Station Hospital
Lt. Colonel T. A. Ragan, MC – 303d Station Hospital
Lt. Colonel J. W. Tiede, MC – 348th Station Hospital
(Honorary Pallbearers included Colonels of the Eastern District, United Kingdom Base, and NCOs
from the 136th Station Hospital)

Lt. Colonel Augustus H. Lancaster, MC, O-486636, assumed acting command on 6 November 1944, as per telephonic orders from Headquarters, VII Hospital Group, APO 559, until 5 December 1944 (he joined the Hospital 29 October 1942 –ed). Colonel George Edward Lindow, MC, O-10845, was assigned to and joined the 136th Station Hospital on 6 December 1942. He became the new CO on 6 December 1944.

Location:
From 1 January 1944, the Hospital operated at Acton Place (a former estate), Sudbury, Suffolk, England, under the District Surgeon’s Office. Per authority of Letter Order, File AG 322 (17), Headquarters United Kingdom Base, 11 November 1944, the 136th Station Hospital was assigned to the VII Hospital Group (Provisional) for administration and coordination of evacuation of patients.

Partial aerial view of Chilton Station – AAF 174, home of the 486th Bomb Gp (H) which arrived at Sudbury (Suffolk) in March 1944. The picture illustrates some of the Group’s installations, such as the ARC club, ground school and gymnasium, PX, and tailor shop…

Organization Strength:

31 December 1943 117 Officers 394 Enlisted Men
31 January 1944 128 Officers 400 Enlisted Men
29 February 1944 130 Officers 400 Enlisted Men
31 March 1944 128 Officers 401 Enlisted Men
30 April 1944 129 Officers 399 Enlisted Men
31 May 1944 122 Officers 400 Enlisted Men
30 June 1944 123 Officers 509 Enlisted Men
31 July 1944 109 Officers 494 Enlisted Men
31 August 1944 106 Officers 484 Enlsited Men
30 September 1944 107 Officers 478 Enlisted Men
31 October 1944 107 Officers 372 Enlisted Men
30 November 1944 108 Officers 434 Enlisted Men
31 December 1944 105 Officers 381 Enlisted Men

The unit was operating in accordance with T/O 8-560, as amended, dated 22 July 1942, with the following complement:

40 Medical Officers
75 ANC Officers (actual figure 74)
1 Warrant Officer
2 Physiotherapists (later reduced to 1)
2 Dietitians (later reduced to 1)
392 Enlisted Men (actual figure 394)

(in May of 1944, the nursing strength was reduced from 75 to 63 in accordance with Change 3, T/O 8-560, dated 4 March 1944. War Department Circular No. 201, dated 22 May 1944, reduced the T/O strength of the EM from 392 to 371. Another WD Circular No. 327, dated 8 August 1944, assigned 1 extra MAC Officer, reducing the staff of MC Officers to 23 and increasing the MAC strength to 10).

General Situation:
During the 1944 period, 119 enemy air raid alerts occurred. No bombs were however dropped in the area occupied by the Hospital. One V-1 fell approximately 1,000 yards distant but no damage was incurred by the organization. A number of V-1 and V-2 flying bombs hit within a radius of twenty-five miles but none ever landed in the immediate vicinity of the Hospital.

View of one of the wards, set up in a Nissen Hut on the Estate grounds.

General Operations:
On 15 June 1944, the bed status was expanded from 834 to 1,254 by the addition of 28 wards accommodating 15 patients each. This expansion was in compliance with a Letter from the Office of The Surgeon Headquarters, dated 12 December 1943. During the current year, the permanent Hospital staff was augmented by Officers, Nurses, and Enlisted Technicians from various units such as Medical Hospital Ship Platoons, Quartermaster Laundry Platoons, Army Ground Forces Replacement Depots, and personnel from adjacent USAAF Airfields. The work force of 36 British civilians played a cooperative part in the maintenance of the 136th Station Hospital, serving as telephonists, clerks, and maintenance and housekeeping personnel. Before D-Day, numerous Commissioned and Enlisted personnel of the unit were placed on DS doing dispensary and other routine medical examination of troops. Other members were placed on DS to the invasion troops about to leave for France.

Apart from its authorized T/E strength, the organization had 8 British ambulances which functioned as part of an emergency ambulance pool. Laundry, mail, supplies, had to be hauled with the limited transportation resources. There were no train deliveries of large quantities of merchandise, so that all rations and supplies had to be picked up by the unit’s organic transportation. One British truck on loan traveled 36 miles once weekly for the purpose of bringing in the necessary rations.

During 1944, a total of 18 Hospital Trains were received. This necessitated the use of 15 to 40 vehicles (depending on the number of casualties). Due to a policy of mutual aid and assistance between nearby units, vehicles of the command participated in loading and unloading 44 Hospital Trains during the past year. As the Hospital had to operate independently it caused the personnel to be distributed more thinly over a greater number of departments. In order to give the patients the proper care they rightfully deserved (increased patients census following D-Day and combat operations on the continent –ed), the circumstances prompted a reduction of personnel used as security force, fire guard, and in policing and housing duties. When two groups of 29 EM were attached to the Hospital for training, they did much to relieve the general situation, as they and members from the Medical Hospital Ship Platoons were assigned temporary jobs. Even convalescent patients were given some jobs throughout the Hospital in keeping with their physical condition and grade. General Assignment men were replaced by Limited Assignment personnel of whom the majority had been inadequately trained to qualify as replacements for the MOS required. It was nevertheless felt that the present allotted personnel was not considered adequate to operate a 1,254-bed station hospital over an extended period of time, but was sufficient to function for short emergencies. With a larger medical installation to operate, the Hospital was authorized (after August 1944) to act as a General Hospital, to elect its own surgery methods and to board patients for their return to the Zone of Interior.

Education and Training:
A regular program was continued throughout the year. Class work, lectures, and actual experience in wards and departments as well as dry run exercises kept the personnel well informed and ready for any emergency. Reception and evacuation exercises helped handle the mass casualties that were admitted. British surgeons gave conferences on war surgery, while American Officers briefed their RAMC colleagues on penicillin therapy.
The EM’s training consisted of 10 hours of classes each week in the following subjects: calisthenics, drill, camouflage, defense against chemical and air attacks, sanitation, and first aid. An NCO School in military leadership was held throughout the month of July. “Army Talks” sessions were held each Monday morning and evening, and informal group discussions set up in the Enlisted Men’s recreation building, with Nurses also attending. Sex morality lectures were given twice weekly by the CO, the Chaplain, and the VD Control Officer.
Officers attended 2 hours of classes each week including themes as field problems, military courtesy, discipline, law, financial, and professional subjects. They also followed fifteen minutes of calisthenics and drill on a daily basis. The Nurses received 3 hours of classes a week consisting of many technical subjects relating to their daily work, supplemented by drill, calisthenics, and military courtesy and discipline. More informal conferences, meetings, rehearsals, and many exercises were held on a regular basis, including gas mask drill, fire drills, and construction and operation of a field kitchen (built from scrap).

Supplies, Equipment, and Transportation:
Medical and Quartermaster supplies were received on requisition and were always adequate. Prior to D-Day supplies were available and readily obtainable at nearby depots. However, the closing of depots in the UK (in view of the forthcoming D-Day operations –ed) affected the availability of certain supplies and required longer hauls.
The authorized vehicles only numbered 1 staff car, 1 jeep, 3 cargo trucks, and 3 ambulances which could not support full mobility of the organization if necessary. Some vehicles were supplemented by British Austin ambulances, and by borrowed means of transportation.  Trips took time and sometimes affected the availability of the unit’s organic vehicles. For example, a laundry trip took 68 miles; a mail trip represented 40 miles; a maintenance & repair truck traveled 40 miles a day; a trip to the dry cleaning station represented 70 miles; a trip to haul rations cost 90 miles, etc.

Conservation of Materials:
Food wastage was prevented by means of regular controls effected by an assigned NCO. Coal and lights were conserved by strict compliance with directives from higher Headquarters. Bathing of patients only took place at designated hours. All wooden crates were stocked and utilized for building shelves, desks, tables, and file cabinets. Screened ashes were used for road filling and pathways around the Hospital area.

Housing, Heat, and Water Supply:
Both Officers and Enlisted Men were housed in MOW Nissen huts excluding a number of Nurses who were quartered in the mansion of the Estate. Proper heating within the scope of adequate fuel conservation and manpower was a major problem (certainly during winter). Comfort and health of the patients was always maintained, at the cost of many manhours. Housekeeping tasks and water heating units functioning was duly taken care of by a detail of 11 EM supplemented by a British team of 6 civilian boilermen. A total of 353 stoves, 13 boilers, 3 furnaces, 3 high-pressure steam boilers, 14 (British) kitchen ranges, and 16 open-grate fire places had to be kept operational at all times.
Water was sourced to a well, 140 feet deep, equipped with an electric pump with a capacity of 8,000 gallons per hour. Two storage tanks with a 56,000 gallon capacity were installed to supply all parts of the Post. In case of emergency, there was an additional water source at the village of Long Melford. Daily consumption was 55,000 gallons per day.

Some Nurses of the 136th Station Hospital relax in front of hutment # 83. They are: standing in the door opening from L to R; 2d Lt. Ruby E. Rose and 2d Lt. F. Evangeline Blauvelt; sitting on the doorstep, 2d Lt. Dinah M. Selvin; and in the foregound, 2d Lt. Etta J. Cooper. 

Food and Messing, Sewage and Waste Disposal, and Insect Control:
The patients mess began to feel the rising patient census after the invasion of the continent, causing quite a burden to the personnel. A diet kitchen functioned under the supervision of the Hospital Dietitian.
Enlisted Men and Officers’ Mess operated under normal conditions. Two buildings were used for central food storage and for vegetables storage. Food and food supplies were obtained from and delivered by the nearby Quartermaster Depot until the last part of December 1944 when it closed. Greens were received every other day; also fruits and fruit juices were issued as prescribed.

The sewage was evacuated through a pipe-borne underground system. It was efficiently provided with a pumping station, one preliminary sedimentation tank, two trickling fillers, two final sedimentation tanks, eight sludge beds and a wooded area containing rock-filled channels for dispersion. Farmers collected the sludge for use as a fertilizer on their fields. Four outside grease traps were proven satisfactory but not too efficient. The grease collected from the kitchens was turned over to the British Salvage. Refuse from the kitchens was collected on a daily basis by British civilian contractors. Trash was collected by a Post detail and dumped at a nearby community ground.

The sanitary department personnel inspected all buildings on a monthly basis for the presence of infestation by insects. No cockroaches, lice, or other insects were encountered. During the summer months, the European Earwig caused considerable annoyance by infesting the living quarters. Daily cleaning of barracks, airing of bed clothes and linen, and frequent changes of straw in paliases helped solve the problem.
Fly traps, fly papers, and poisons were extensively used. All kitchens were screened (farming district with many flies). Occasional swarms of wasps and bees caused some annoyance with a number of personnel being stung.

Venereal Disease Control:
In 1944 the command reported 6 cases of gonorrhea but no new cases of syphilis. Twenty-three days were lost as a result of VD. Control measures were implemented throughout the year, consisting of periodic lectures by the CO, the VD Officer, and the Chaplain. Pro-kits were available to all men (free issue) upon going on pass or furlough.
Prevention methods for infection were demonstrated and routine monthly physical inspections of all EM were carried out with emphasis placed on detection of unreported cases of Venereal Disease. The Pro-Station was in operation 24 hours daily. During the year 1944, 93 prophylactic treatments were administered.

Professional Medical and Surgical Services:
Formal ward rounds were held each week and medical meetings of the combined staffs monthly. Radiology and laboratory sections held conferences on interesting radiological and clinical-pathological cases with guests from nearby American and British Army installations attending. Two special conferences were organized on the different aspects of penicillin. Exhibitions, demonstrations, classes, and visits, were attended at various times, either at higher Headquarters or at the American School Center. Medical Officers and Nurses were often sent on DS from 10 to 30 days to other installations, while personnel of other units were assigned to the 136th for identical purposes.

Partial aerial view showing the Motor Pool of the 198th General Hospital. Photograph taken in Paris, France, 1944.

7,990 patients were admitted to the Hospital during the year, with 14,285 outpatients receiving a total of 18,810 treatments. Since receiving authorization to board patients, a total of 797 wounded were effectively returned to the Zone of Interior.
4,975 patients were admitted for miscellaneous diseases. Some remarkable new kinds of ailments or diseases were observed, such as 17 TB cases; 305 NP cases; and 288 trench foot cases. A total of 859 injuries were noted, while battle casualties received totaled 2,156.

The first Hospital Train with casualties arrived from the continent on 16 July 1944. It should be noted that the surgical procedure in effect at the 136th consisted of the routine type of surgery permitted in Station Hospitals, plus the surgical care of battle casualties from the neighboring airfields. United States Army Air Forces battle casualties of whom there were 278, mainly consisted of flak wounds, bullet wounds, burns, and injuries sustained in aircraft crashes. A total of 1,705 battle wounded were received from the continent. As time went on, the casualties received were older, and many wounds and injuries required treatment for varying periods of time before closure was possible. Burns were treated by gentle washing and irrigation, followed by sulfadiazine ointment and an occlusive pressure dressing. Wounds were treated according to directives and procedures; and all were thoroughly debrided and left open. Sulfa powder and penicillin, after they became available, were placed in the wounds initially. Introduction of the new penicillin drug helped with the efficient treatment of pneumonia, VD, wounds and infections. Abdominal wounds were numerous, traction was used extensively, skin graft was applied, and if possible new medical and surgical methods were introduced or improved.

A total of 2,889 surgical operations were performed, including general surgery, orthopedics, and urology.

Nursing, Dental, and Veterinary Services:
The 63 Nurses had to cover 28 wards night and day and therefore worked longer hours than normal. During the first part of 1944, when the hospital census was low, a great many Nurses spent many hours in training programs in nursing peculiar to the Hospital’s setup. Classes were also held in the treatment of shocks, administration of whole blood and plasma, therapy of penicillin, emergency of flak cases, and general admission and care of battle casualties. Nurses who showed aptitude or interest were trained in central supply, surgery, anesthetics, burn wards, and other ‘specialties’. This proved very valuable when the patient load suddenly increased and remained heavy to the end of the year.

The dental service catered to the needs of the hospital patients, the personnel, and varying needs of nearby units. The first priority was that all patients returning to duty received a full and complete dental care before being discharged; the second priority was extended to the Hospital personnel; the third priority was given to those patients destined for evacuation to the ZI. A total of 20,354 operations/treatments were performed during the year, with 1,135 outpatients from other units treated.

One Tec 4 Enlisted Man, trained in food, meat and dairy hygiene, conducted routine class 5 and 7 inspections of all foodstuffs received from QMC Depots for all messes in the Hospital area.

Reception and Evacuation:
Admissions were routine, except for the occasional rush due to AAF battle casualties. When patients were to be boarded for the ZI, evacuation was by ambulance or hospital train. Patients returned to duty through their local organizations were transported via an ambulance of their own unit.
From July 1944, the entire picture changed and reception, disposition, and evacuation of patients became a major problem from both the medical and administrative viewpoint. After arrival of the first hospital train with casualties from France (16 July 1944), an average of 2 hospital trains a month were received for the rest of 1944. The average number of patients received with each train was 270. These patients were brought in from the continent, and evacuated from transit hospitals in the southwest part of England, and then further evacuated to the 136th Station. Approximate time taken to unload a hospital train of 270 patients until they were bedded in the respective wards was 1 hour and 15 minutes. Due to the influx of casualties from the continent, the census trebled in a very short time and it became imperative for the organization to establish and maintain a fluid system of evacuation. More administration work had to be done and completed prior to transfer of patients. Clothing had to be issued in certain cases, temporary service records had to be initialled, special orders had to be issued. The majority of the evacuees were sent to a General Hospital about 30 miles from the Post. This was done by ambulance it being impractical to use a hospital train for the short haul. The majority of these cases were patients who would eventually be boarded for the ZI or for surgical treatment which the 136th could not furnish. 50 transfers per week was the average number.

7 June 1944, arrival of D-Day wounded from the continent at one of the casualty reception facilities in southern England. Ships were unloaded and patients transported to holding and transit hospitals for initial triage, after which they were directed to other medical facilities for further treatment in England. Quite a number of casualties from the continent were eventually received at the 136th Station Hospital for treatment and medical care.

In the middle of October 1944, the 136th Station was authorized to function as a General Hospital and board its own patients for the Zone of Interior. However, about a month later, upon being assigned to the VII US Hospital Group (Provisional) for administrative purposes, patients could only be evacuated upon the order of the Hospital Group. This brought about an accumulation of patients until a sufficient number were ready for disposition. Each evacuation presented a problem as frequently the method of evacuation (sea or air) was unknown until the last minute.
In order to avoid loss of time, unnecessary strain and clerical problems, the following plan was successfully devised:

  • all patients were fed before leaving the Hospital
  • all ambulatory patients were gathered together at the patients’ mess where they were properly tagged and furnished with the necessary papers
  • all litter patients were loaded in ambulances through the A and D Office, enabling the Hospital to  load 50 litter cases in 45 minutes from the time they were first picked up on the ward

Return of patients to duty, not truly an evacuation problem, did present difficulties. The Hospital returned approximately 50 patients a week to duty through the Replacement Pool. Instead of returning 6 or 7 patients per day to duty via the pool they were accumulated until Friday of each week. Arrangements were then made with the RTO for train reservations. Previous experience showed that combat personnel returning to a Replacement Depot were often inclined to go AWOL en route and to take unauthorized delays. The plan to send them in large groups under proper supervision of a high-ranking NCO cut the delinquency to a minimum and facilitated their reception at the Replacement Pool.

Welfare, American Red Cross, Religion and Sports:
The Officers and Nurses’ Club was re-decorated during January 1944 and murals painted in one of the rooms. Also the reading and game room was re-painted, and various rugs and a new radio added. A library containing about 1,000 volumes of fiction was obtained. Dances were held once a month with music provided by the Enlisted Men’s Band. Cribbage tournaments were organized twice a month.

A building formerly used by the British construction company was made available to the EM and turned into a recreation room. The conversion was completed on 14 February 1944 and inaugurated with a formal opening dance. The floor space, representing some 6,800 square feet, proved adequate for a large dance floor, a stage for an orchestra, a lounge, a game room, or a gymnasium.
Dances were held each Saturday night and female companions were obtained from the town of Long Melford, Sudbury, Colchester, Glemsford, British WAAF, and US WAC Detachments. Music was provided by a 9-piece EM’s band which started performing from 1 March 1944. The orchestra played four times for British dances and also performed in the Officers’ Club. It played for outside audiences at the “Salute the Soldier” exhibition in Long Melford and Sudbury in the summer.
Motion pictures were shown twice nightly, except on Mondays, at the Post theater. Card parties and bingo nights were organized twice a month. USO shows performed at the Post once every 2 or 3 months, with visits from George Raft, James Cagney, Ella Logan, and Joe Louis.

General view of the Dental Clinic at the 9th Evacuation Hospital. Photograph taken during the unit’s time in France, 1944.

The ARC personnel assigned to the 136th consisted of: 1 Assistant Field Director; 1 Senior Recreation Worker; 1 Recreation Worker; 1 Secretary; and 2 additional British Civilian Workers. Their tasks consisted in assisting patients by writing letters, supplying them comfort packages, providing recreational and social activities and sightseeing tours to nearby towns. In the current year they handled 503 cases of personal family problems.

Religious services were provided by one Catholic and one Protestant Chaplain. Chaplains of other faiths were invited and held services in the Hospital’s Chapel at designated times. In addition to the patients and personnel, both Chaplains were called to hold services at the adjacent Army Air Forces Airfields whenever needed.
The 136th was honored with a visit by Archbishop Francis J. Spellman, Military Ordinariate of the Catholic Chaplains and Vicar of US Armed Forces, on 6 September 1944, when he was touring the United Kingdom (part of his 3-month European tour –ed).

From 1 January 1944 to 31 March 1944 the EM basketball team played twice weekly against other service teams. Annual ping-pong tournaments were held as well and boxing exhibitions took place. Two softball ‘diamonds’ were constructed during April and May. Competition tours occurred from May to July 1944. Later, two volleyball courts were added and 4 volleyball teams were set up for the summer months.

Anglo-American Relations and Education:
Anglo-American relations were always cordial and included many visits to the homes of British people. These visits were returned by the British on many occasions. A Thanksgiving party was organized for 32 British children from Sudbury. Formal entertainment of British civilians and the organization of a Christmas Party for 260 children from Sudbury, Long Melford, and Acton were held. All the children received a stocking full of candy from Santa Claus. Dances were held on a regular basis and attended by numerous British civilians. American Officers frequently visited nearby British military and civilian Hospitals during the year.

The British “Brains Trust” of Cambridge University appeared three times for formal group discussions. Various lectures on local history were given by British civilians.
It appears that 94% percent of the command subscribed to “The Stars and Stripes” and other allied publications during the reported period. Approximately 4% of the organization enrolled in Army correspondence courses.

Rehabilitation and Convalescence:
The Rehabilitation Department (which started 2 November 1943) continued to operate with success. It was based on lectures, exercises, calisthenics, remedial classes, manual training, training films and aids, and additional topics including foreign language, aircraft identification, map reading, compass reading, scouting, and booby-traps and mines identification and usage. Average monthly attendance rose to 2,120 patients.
One Captain, Medical Corps, assisted by 1 Lieutenant, Infantry, and 4 Enlisted personnel, were in charge of rehabilitation in the wards; with one Lieutenant, assisted by 3 EM, in charge of physiotherapy. One Enlisted chiropodist was in charge of the foot clinic. Wall bars, weights, pulleys, stationary bicycle, foot and ankle exercisers, basketball net, badminton court, floor mats, and other aids were used for rehabilitation of patients.

A litter patient is being carried from a Hospital Train to a waiting ambulance for further evacuation to one of the many hospitals of the United Kingdom Base.

Training schedules were prepared by Officers. Ward lectures were given each week with subjects derived from “Army Talks”. Apart from the latter the patients received extra lectures and sessions covering self-aid, map reading, aircraft identification, armor identification, and various aspects of military tactics. The physiotherapy department was provided with bakers, UV lamps, whirlpool bathing, and special exercises.

A Convalescent Battalion was established on 19 July 1944 consisting of four ward tents (used as patient living quarters) and one pyramid tent (for unit headquarters) led by a special staff composed of a 2d Lieutenant, MAC, (CO); one Sergeant; and one Corporal, with an initial strength of 37 patients. Its primary mission was to remove the convalescing soldier from a hospital environment, bring him back into a military atmosphere, shorten his convalescence period, and begin a complete physical and mental reconditioning by means of a carefully balanced training schedule coupled with outside fatigue details, so that any soldier returning to duty from the hospital would be ready to immediately resume an active and functional role in a combat unit. Patient instructors were selected on the basis of their abilities and previous service in order to fully utilize the acquired experience of combat-wise veterans and to enable the less-seasoned soldier to profit from the mistakes and observations of the men who had served under fire in many campaigns.

The Convalescent Battalion (which started as a company) functioned as a complete subordinate unit of the 136th Station Hospital. With the help of this ‘special’ unit, all departments were maintained by patients under the direction of patient NCOs. This kept trained personnel in touch with their former jobs, converted hitherto ‘green’ men into confident and competent personnel who assisted NCOs in maintaining initiative and command presence during the various phases of activities. They received instruction, developed skills, and were trained in different activities, including the use of small arms such as the .45 caliber auto pistol, the .45 caliber submachine gun, the .30 caliber Garand and Springfield rifles, the .30 caliber carbine, etc. with demolitions, land mines, booby-traps, smoke, and field communications emphasized.
In September, the Battalion’s permanent staff was increased to 4 men, the tentage now included 17 ward tents, 9 pyramid tents, and 1 indoor classroom, and the number of patients grew to 251. Although being a comparatively new phase in a Station Hospital’s work, there was conclusive evidence that the Convalescent Battalion was a success. During the period from 19 July 1944 to 31 December 1944, it trained, clothed, processed and returned to duty 1,944 Enlisted patients.

Construction:
During the early part of 1944, overhead covered ways were constructed to enable the patients to walk freely to the various wards without being exposed to the rain and snow. Actual construction commenced on 26 February 1944 with equipment and materiel supplied through the District Engineer and the British Garrison Engineer. A sergeant pertaining to a US Engineer Combat Battalion supervised the work of the MD personnel.

The 28 ward tents necessary for the hospital expansion program were fully winterized, with works starting 1 December 1944. The construction was carried out by a Platoon of US Army Engineers supplemented by convalescing patients. The tents were used as an overflow for each ward and also housed ambulatory patients until they were physically fit to be transferred to the Convalescent Battalion or returned to duty.

Additional Personnel:
The following personnel pertaining to the 1st Auxiliary Surgical Team were on DS at this Post as follows:

3d Shock Team (from 17 Oct 43 to 26 Apr 44)
Captain Maurice M. Rosenbaum, MC, O-337818
2d Lieutenant Kathleen C. Musik, ANC, N-734631
Technician 5th Grade Raymond Gholson, MC, 37502250
Technician 5th Grade Marcel Snipes, MC, 37238398

9th General Surgical Team (from 17 Oct 43 to 7 Jun 44)
Major George C. Hall, MC, O-1687212
Captain Robert R. Donley, MC, O-331370
1st Lieutenant Charles B. Mitchell, MC, O-440274
2d Lieutenant Hazel Odom, ANC, N-733225
Technician 4th Grade John E. Lowrey, MC, 16144419
Private Hugh C. Cherry, MC, 38447739

Personnel Roster:
Officers
Colonel George E. Lindow, MC, O-10845, Commanding Officer (assumed command 5 December 1944)
Colonel Joseph D. Stout, MC, O-215631, Commanding Officer (died 6 November 1944)
Lieutenant Colonel Jay F. Havice, MC, O-486872, Executive Officer
Lieutenant Colonel Augustus H. Lancaster, MC, O-486636, Chief of Medical Service (acting CO)
Major Charles M. Arnold, MC, O-200931, Chief of Surgical Service (assigned from 7th General Dispensary 6 March 1944 – transferred to Headquarters B Section 1, Communications Zone, 14 July 1944)
Major John J. Brick, MC, O-1691005, Chief of Surgical Service (transferred to 7th General Dispensary, 8 March 1944)
Major Maurice Colman, MC, O-492842, Chief of Medical Service
Major Oscar Glassman, MC, O-494395, Chief of Septic Surgical Section
Major Harvey S. Johnson, MC, O-474068, Chief of Orthopedic Section (assigned from 97th Service Group Army, Air Forces Station AAF-167, 1 January 1944)
Major Edgar O’Quinn, DC, O-398146, Chief of Dental Service (transferred to 303d Station Hospital, 21 April 1944)
Major Ralph D. Richardson, MC, O-1696223, Chief of General Surgical Service
Major William C. Smedley, DC, O-402461, Asst Chief of Dental Service (became Chief of Dental Service)
Major Stanley S. Tanz, MC, O-330067, Asst Chief of Orthopedic Section
Major Donald H. Webster, DC, O-297315, Asst Dental Surgeon (assigned from 303d Station Hospital, 24 April 1944)
Major Malvin F. White, MC, O-469170, Surgical Ward Officer (assigned from 91st Evacuation Hospital 17 March 1944 – transferred to 16th General Hospital, 7 January 1944)
Captain Albert B. Anderson, MC, O-1684070, Surgical Ward Officer
Captain Lawrence G. Balding, MC, O-475596, Chief of EENT Section (transferred to 115th General Hospital, 21 November 1944)
Captain Morris Binder, MC, O-492970, Chief of Neuro-Psychiatric Section
Captain Isaac E. Broyles, DC, O-490986, Dental Officer General
Captain Paul Cohen, MC, O-490226, Ward Officer Medical (transferred to 10th Replacement Depot, 29 August 1944)
Captain Hyman M. Finkelstein, MC, O-1690585, Medical Ward Officer
Captain Walcutt W. Gibson, MC, O-381564, Medical Ward Officer
Captain Charles A. Hauber, MC, O-470070 (assigned from 10th Replacement Depot, 20 December 1944)
Captain Lionel M. Heiden, MC, O-472975, Medical Ward Officer (transferred to 356th Engineer General Service Regiment, 9 April 1944)
Captain Robert H. Johnson, MC, O-485583 (assigned from 10th Replacement Depot 20 December 1944)
Captain Martin J. O’Donnel, ChC, O-499055, Chaplain, Catholic
Captain James P. Palmer, Jr., MC, O-257215, Chief of X-Ray Service (transferred to 163d General Hospital, 27 September 1944)
Captain Boris Petroff, MC, O-329870, Chief of Urological Section (transferred to Detachment of Patients 136th Station Hospital, 17 February 1944)
Captain Platt R. Powell, MC, O-381492, Surgical Ward Officer
Captain Jack E. Shangold, MC, O-1692132, Medical Ward Officer (assigned from 15th Replacement Depot, 9 June 1944 – transferred to 16th Replacement Depot, 10 January 1944)
Captain Adam M. Torrance, MC, 486919, Surgical Ward Officer
Captain Peter Zanca, MC, O-369962, Chief of X-Ray Service (assigned from 314th Station Hospital, 5 October 1944)
1st Lieutenant Henry L. Bejian, MC, O-1691123, Chief Anesthetist (promoted to Captain 1 March 1944)
1st Lieutenant Michael Bender, MC, O-1689687, Surgical Ward Officer (transferred to 97th Service Group, Army Air Forces Station AAF-367, 10 January 1944)
1st Lieutenant Lester Brown, MC, O-514562, EENT Ward Officer (assigned from 120th Station Hospital, 28 January 1944 – promoted to Captain 1 May 1944)
1st Lieutenant Richard L. DeSaussure, Jr., MC, O-376730, Surgical Ward Officer (promoted to Captain 1 March 1944)
1st Lieutenant Milton T. Goldsmith, MAC, O-1542848, Asst Registrar
1st Lieutenant William R. Howard, MAC, O-1541572, General Supply Officer (promoted to Captain 1 January 1944)
1st Lieutenant Darwin M. Hill, MAC, O-1542718, Neuro-Psychiatric Department (assigned from 10th Replacement Depot, 8 September 1944 – transferred to 805th Medical Service Detachment, 8 December 1944)
1st Lieutenant Gregor W. Kutz, ChC, O-525789, Asst Chaplain, Protestant (assigned from Headquarters Eastern District, 21 February 1944)
1st Lieutenant John J. Larkin, Jr., MC, O-512392, Chief of Laboratory Service (promoted to Captain 1 February 1944)
1st Lieutenant Morris Lipetz, MAC, O-1542686, Medical Supply Officer
1st Lieutenant Preston B. Lowrance, MC, O-472023, Officer in Charge of Admission & Disposition Office (promoted to Captain 1 March 1944 – assigned to 200th General Hospital, 29 November 1944)
1st Lieutenant Walter J. Lyons, SnC, O-501196, Asst Laboratory Officer
1st Lieutenant Franklin A. Mahr, DC, O-511757, Dental Officer General (promoted to Captain 1 May 1944)
1st Lieutenant Clarence E. McKeown, MAC, O-1541511, Adjutant (promoted to Captain 1 January 1944)
1st Lieutenant Wa To Mok, MC, O-544769, Surgical Ward Officer (assigned from 2d Replacement Depot, 11 September 1944)
1st Lieutenant Saul H. Sherman, MC, O-435588, Medical Ward Officer (promoted to Captain 1 March 1944)
1st Lieutenant Walter F. Thayer, MAC, O-1543569, Transportation Officer (assigned to Asst Mess Officer, 29 November 1944)
1st Lieutenant John Weber, MAC, O-1543549, Mess Officer (promoted to Captain 1 January 1944)
2d Lieutenant Sheldon R. Eisnetz, MAC, O-2041008, Asst Medical Supply Officer (transferred to 1st Infantry Division, 23 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Wolf Levine, MAC, O-1535219, Asst Registrar (assigned to Port and Transportation Officer 23 November 1944)
2d Lieutenant Walderman C. Schaufler, MAC, O-1535281, Asst Port and Transportation Officer (assigned to Asst Registrar, 23 November 1944)
2d Lieutenant George V. Schlitzer, MAC, O-1546405, Transportation Officer
Warrant Officer, Junior Grade, Donald J. Clark, NMB, W-2105701, Asst Adjudant (promoted to Chief Warrant Officer, 12 February 1944)

Technicians operate field x-ray machines at the 38th Evacuation Hospital.

Army Nurse Corps
1st Lieutenant Ruth S. Middleton, ANC, N-728447, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital, 18 May 1944)
1st Lieutenant Helen M. Thomae, ANC, N-701793, Principal Chief Nurse (promoted to Captain, 15 March 1944)
1st Lieutenant Florence E. Tolston, ANC, N-742013, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital, 18 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Aileen E. Akins, ANC, N-720676, Nurse General (transferred to 96th General Hospital, 6 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Louise L. Alford, HD, R-747, Hospital Dietitian (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 15 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Astrid M. Anderson, ANC, N-751793, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Esther M. Anderson, ANC, N-751641, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Anne L. Barrett, ANC, N-761202, Nurse General (transferred to 135th General Hospital, 10 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Mary Bayley, ANC, N-751636, Nurse General (transferred to 137th General Hospital, 12 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Alice D. Beecher, ANC, N-759379, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital,   10 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Florence E. Blauvelt, ANC, N-751717, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Mary B. Bourassa, ANC, N-721720, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Nettie Bryant, ANC, N-751845, Nurse General (transferred to 109th General Hospital, 17 August 1944)
2d Lieutenant Katherine C. Bublitz, ANC, N-751288, Asst Principal Chief Nurse (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 1 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Irene M. Calantuno, ANC, N-751713, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Lorraine L. Clifford, ANC, N-751755, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Mary Comstock, ANC, N-721661, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Mary M. Connolly, ANC, N-751684, Chief Nurse Surgical Wards (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 1 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Etta J. Cooper, ANC, N-751700, Nurse General (transferred to 109th General Hospital, 17 August 1944)
2d Lieutenant Mary A. Crowley, ANC, N-751280, Nurse General (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 1 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Julia A. Davis, ANC, N-761082, Nurse General (transferred to 117th General Hospital, 20 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Annie M. Dickeson, ANC, N-751796, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Mary C. Donnelly, ANC, N-751807, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Marjorie Ethridge, ANC, N-724303, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital, 18 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Dorothea C. Etter, ANC, N-751721, Nurse General (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 1 May 1944 – assigned to Asst Chief Nurse EENT Section)
2d Lieutenant Phyllis Field, ANC, N-751857, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Eileen M. Finnegan, ANC, N-751728, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Ruth L. Fisher, ANC, N-751704, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Herlen M. Flynn, ANC, N-751568, Nurse General (transferred to 112th General Hospital, 12 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Mary E. Foley, ANC, N-751795, Nurse General (transferred to 135th General Hospital, 10 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Catherine M. Gailey, ANC, N-751655, Nurse General (transferred to 96th General Hospital, 13 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Polly E. Gale, ANC, N-751117, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Mary L. Gardiner, ANC, B-759214, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital, 18 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Clotilde M. Govoni, ANC, N-721840, Nurse General (transferred to Headquarters USSTAF, 5 April 1944)
2d Lieutenant Katherine K. Gillespie, ANC, N-767292, Nurse General (assigned from Headquarters 303d Station Hospital, 27 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Marguerite E. Hannagan, ANC, N-720785, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital, 18 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Harriette C. Hayes, ANC, N-751788, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Elizabeth B. Hill, ANC, N-751794, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Alice M. Hilland, ANC, N-751852, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Florence E. Holland, ANC, N-729487, Nurse General (assigned from 30th General Hospital, 26 February 1944)
2d Lieutenant Marie T. Horne, ANC, N-7513231, Nurse General (transferred to 117th General Hospital, 18 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Dorothy M. Hoyt, ANC, N-751816, Chief Nurse General Supply (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 15 April 1944)
2d Lieutenant Hazel H. Hughes, ANC, N-759239, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital, 18 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Margaret E. Hughes, ANC, N-761108, Nurse General (transferred to Detachment of Patients 136th Station Hospital, 19 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Leone M. Hyde, ANC, N-751854, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Elsie Iacobucci, ANC, N-721541, Nurse General (transferred to Detachment of Patients 4209 US Army Hospital Plant, 28 November 1944)
2d Lieutenant Ruth E. Jeanfavre, ANC, N-751836, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Charlette J. Johnston, ANC, N-751815, Nurse General (transferred to 112th General Hospital, 12 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Catherine M. Joyce, ANC, N-751840, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Demtro Kachavas, ANC, N-751785, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Bulah E. Kantz, ANC, N-761203, Nurse General (assigned from Headquarters 10th Replacement Depot, 14 January 1944 – transferred to 4209 US Army Hospital Plant, 26 December 1944)
2d Lieutenant Stasia E. Klenk, ANC, N-751848, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Martha E. Kosek, ANC, N-735123, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Theresa G. LaBrie, ANC, N-751026, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Rhea T. LaReau, ANC, N-751843, Nurse General

Army surgeons carry out a life-saving procedure on a wounded American soldier somewhere in Europe, 1944.

2d Lieutenant Hazel S. Lee, ANC, N-761206, Nurse General (assigned from Headquarters 10th Replacement Depot, 14 January 1944)
2d Lieutenant Charlotte W. Lewis, ANC, N-751677, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Ruth S. Livingstone, ANC, N-751864, Nurse General (transferred to 112th General Hospital, 12 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Hilda C. Lundberg, ANC, N-751808, Nurse General (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 1 June 1944 – assigned to Chief Nurse X-Ray Department)
2d Lieutenant Jean B. MacLeod, ANC, N-751833, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Harriette E. MacMeeken, ANC, N-751749, Nurse General (transferred to Detachment of Patients 136th Station Hospital, 17 April 1944)
2d Lieutenant Ruth M. Maderia, ANC, N-761057, Nurse General (assigned from Headquarters 10th Replacement Depot, 13 January 1944)
2d Lieutenant Elnor A. McDermott, ANC, N-751279, Nurse General (transferred to 109th General Hospital, 17 August 1944)
2d Lieutenant Catherine M. McDonough, ANC, N-751706, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Alberta F. Miller, ANC, N-761026, Nurse General (transferred to 307th Station Hospital, 24 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Stephanie B. Misuk, ANC, N-751847, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Eleanore M. Murphy, ANC, N-751612, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Pauline Musco, ANC, N-751412, Nurse General (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 1 May 1944 – Asst Chief Nurse Surgery)
2d Lieutenant Bessie M. Muraski, ANC, N-721049, Chief Nurse Medical Wards (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 1 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Bette M. O’Connell, ANC, N-751600, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Evelyn B. Ouellette, ANC, N-751832, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Roberta R. Perilstein, ANC, N-761204, Nurse General (assigned from Headquarters 10th Replacement Depot, 14 January 1944)
2d Lieutenant Audrey G. Pratt, ANC, N-721867, Nurse General (transferred to USSTAF, Headquarters United States Strategic Air Forces, 5 April 1944)
2d Lieutenant Marjorie J. Pratt, ANC, N-751829, Nurse General (transferred to 96th General Hospital, 13 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Ruth C. Randall, ANC, N-751879, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Ruth E. Rayno, ANC, N-751775, Nurse General (transferred to 117th General Hospital, 20 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Harriet L. Reed, ANC, N-761109, Nurse General (assigned from 10th Replacement Depot, 14 January 1944)
2d Lieutenant Lois H. Reed, ANC, N-728202, Nurse General (assigned from 303d Station Hospital, 27 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Ann E. Reidy, ANC, N-751601, Chief Nurse Surgical Wards (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 1 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Evelin D. Rome, ANC, N-751818, Nurse General (transferred to 96th General Hospital, 13 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Ruby E. Rose, ANC, N-751718, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Ernestine L. Ruel, ANC, N-751692, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Ruth M. Sawyer, ANC, N-751912, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Evelyn A. Schermoerhorn, ANC, N-759926, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital, 18 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Catherine Smith, ANC, N-760381, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital 18 May 1944)
2d Lieutenant Edna M. Snecinski, ANC, N-751821, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Ethel E. Stiles, ANC, N-751837, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Dinah M. Selvin, PT, M-530, Physio-Therapist
2d Lieutenant Thelma M. Thayer, ANC, N-721876, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Margaret E. Thibodeau, ANC, N-72 877, Nurse General (transferred to 117th General Hospital, 20 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Elizabeth A. Thompson, ANC, N-751859, Nurse General (promoted to 1st Lieutenant 1 June 1944 – assigned to Chief Nurse EENT Section)
2d Lieutenant Ethel M. Todd, ANC, N-751838, Nurse General (transferred to 137th General Hospital, 12 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Lois H. Troske, ANC, N-751728, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Ethel P. Wallace, ANC, N-751823, Nurse General (transferred to 117th General Hospital, 20 July 1944)
2d Lieutenant Stella Warchol, ANC, N-751822, Nurse General (promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 1 May 1944 – assigned to Asst Chief Nurse Medical Section)
2d Lieutenant Lenora E. Wheeler, ANC, N-745266, Nurse General (assigned from Headquarters 41st Evacuation Hospital, 14 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Kate E. Whipple, ANC, N-761273, Nurse General (assigned from 10th Replacement Depot, 14 January 1944)
2d Lieutenant Erma L. Whittier, ANC, N-751701, Nurse General
2d Lieutenant Lillian A. Wright, ANC, N-751917, Chief Nurse Anesthetist (transferred to Headquarters Eastern District, United Kingdom Base, 14 March 1944)
2d Lieutenant Mildred H. Wyren, ANC, N-751699, Nurse General (assigned from 10th Replacement Depot, 13 January 1944)
2d Lieutenant Josephine R. Zagrapan, ANC, N-759424, Nurse General (transferred to 30th General Hospital, 18 May 1944)

B-17 Flying Fortresses over Sudbury. The 486th Bomb Group (H) initially flew B-24H & B-24J Liberators. The transition to B-17G Flying Fortresses started in July and was completed in August 1944. The 486th BG (H) comprised the 832d – 833d – 834th – 835th Bomber Squadrons, all part of the 4th Bomb Wing, 3d Air Division, 8th United States Army Air Force. The aircraft tail codes were a large white “W” in a black square. 

Enlisted Men
M/Sgt Joseph A. Senechal, MD, 31024118
M/Sgt George F. Sharp, Jr., MD, 39014656
F/Sgt Joseph A. Stockloss, MD, 6138269
T/Sgt Earl E. Clark, MD, 31024127 (transferred to Detachment of Patients 136th Station Hospital, 21 May 1944)
T/Sgt Dennis M. Kain, MD, 2391306 (transferred to Detachments of Patients 4209 US Army Hospital Plant, 26 November 1944)
T/Sgt Irvin Weissman, MD, 13006587
T/Sgt Charlie Whitehead, MD, 68499113 (demoted to Private 26 June 1944 – promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 26 June 1944)
S/Sgt Lester Casper, MD, 32543783
S/Sgt Lester A. Crump, Jr., MD, 13013046
S/Sgt Edward J. Kovac, MD, 13022152 (promoted to Technical Sergeant, 8 March 1944)
S/Sgt Walter P. McGlothlin, MD, 39181157
S/Sgt Chester E. Metzler, MD, 35030623
S/Sgt Otto H. Nieder, MD, 20800968 (transferred to 10th Replacement Depot, 2 August 1944)
S/Sgt Edward E. Spotts, MD, 17086706 (promoted to Master Sergeant, 10 January 1944)
Tec 3 John M. Carrick, MD, 33330112
Tec 3 John B. Gannon, MD, 39158605
Tec 3 John H. Sheffield, MD, 36245111
Tec 3 Charles W. Sherych, MD, 36337749
Tec 3 William C. Siegmayer, MD, 36339106
Tec 3 Michael F. Slepnikoff, MD, 19083900 (demoted to Private, 5 September 1944 – transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 7 September 1944)
Tec 3 Morgan I. Somerville, MD, 17050971
Tec 3 Fred Spriester, Jr., MD, 37200176
Sgt Frank R. Casellini, MD, 39095534
Sgt Frank E. DeJarnatt, MD, 39003264
Sgt Robert M. Edward, MD, 31050611 (promoted to Staff Sergeant, 10 January 1944)
Sgt Cyril A. Laflamme, MD, 31243732
Sgt Edward N. Melnicoff, MD, 33331007 (demoted to Private, 23 May 1944)
Sgt Bolesivaff Polubidski, MD, 6137797
Sgt Steve G. Presnak, MD, 36339302
Sgt Norman Roth, Jr., MD, 33344307 (promoted to Staff Sergeant, 6 August 1944)
Sgt Gilbert E. Tisdale, MD, 31000320
Sgt Ralph E. Wade, MD, 35454223
Sgt Frank J. Zurfluh, Jr., 39183520 (promoted to Technical Sergeant, 6 August 1944)
Tec 4 Ralph P. Altmeyer, MD, 35740491 (transferred to 163d General Hospital, 6 October 1944)
Tec 4 Harry W. Berg, MD, 39182851
Tec 4 Ralph Cohn, MD, 12065969
Tec 4 Vincent DiNitto, MD, 31068137 (transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 16 September 1944)
Tec 4 William A. Fredell, MD, 37177143 (promoted to Technician 3d Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 4 James R. Fry, MD, 37144847
Tec 4 Henry W George, MD, 38143766
Tec 4 Jack M. Greer, MD, 13023754
Tec 4 Leland R. Jacobs, MD, 12138101
Tec 4 Woodrow W. Kienast, MD, 37193115
Tec 4 Frank W. Kolakowski, 13006592 (demoted to Private, 22 January 1944 – transferred to 3618th Quartermaster Truck Company, 4 June 1944)
Tec 4 Henry K. Ludwin, MD, 32212885
Tec 4 Henry P. Michaels, MD, 35402237
Tec 4 Patrick J. Mullin, MD, 38115053
Tec 4 Lawrence Price, MD, 37294890
Tec 4 Clifford L. Quinney, MD, 20149196
Tec 4 Joseph E. Reardon, MD, 32618725
Tec 4 John G. Rice, MD, 36229793
Tec 4 Edward S. Romanowicz, MD, 35346057

Medical Officers examine the x-ray of a wounded GI at the 38th Evacuation Hospital. The patient was severely injured after a shall fragment struck the back of his head and became lodged at the base of his brain.

Tec 4 Felix J. Runewicz, MD, 36223423 (transferred to 96th General Hospital, 30 June 1944)
Tec 4 Kenneth K. Sherer, MD, 37193019 (promoted to Staff Sergeant, 29 May 1944)
Tec 4 William E. Simpson, MD, 31030273
Tec 4 Jacob E. Snover, MD, 32166794
Tec 4 Earl M. Steiert, MD, 37197762
Tec 4 Anthony Swiadek, MD, 32014552 (assigned to American School Center, 11 September 1944)
Tec 4 Floyd G. Thompson, MD, 17078314
Tec 4 Alexander F. Truppi, Jr., MD, 32158588
Tec 4 William H. Tucker, Jr., MD, 31021643 (promoted to Staff Sergeant, 18 March 1944 – demoted to Private, 9 April 1944 – promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 15 April 1944 – transferred to 12th  Replacement Depot, 25 September 1944)
Tec 4 Louis P. Turek, MD, 36162658
Tec 4 Arthur M. Venn, MD, 32580072 (promoted to Staff Sergeant, 10 January 1944)
Tec 4 Charles E. Weinhold, Jr., MD, 33366841 (promoted to Technician 3d Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 4 Frederick J. White, Jr., MD, 38233621 (promoted to Technician 3d Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 4 Charles G. Zickefoose, MD, 35380008
Cpl Ralph C. Chadsey, MD, 32619032
Cpl Paul J. Creamer, MD, 33010617 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 6 June 1944)
Cpl Dewey E. Farley, MD, 35267435 (promoted to Sergeant, 23 May 1944)
Cpl Jean N. Lavigne, MD, 31044168
Cpl Everett J. Lee, MD, 31009195
Cpl James D. McCarthy, MD, 31160877 (assigned from 303d Station Hospital, 12 February 1944)
Cpl Alfred L. Okoniewski, MD, 16151337 (demoted to Private, 13 February 1944)
Cpl Curtis L. Polen, MD, 33525536
Cpl Robert W. Rushford, MD, 11000226
Cpl Hubert L. Smotherton, MD, 38124150 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944 – transferred to 805th Medical Service Detachment, 26 December 1944)
Cpl Owen B. Snyder, MD, 32580566
Cpl George W. Tyner, MD, 18160346
Tec 5 Ellsworth G. Alguire, MD, 32849871 (transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 16 September 1944)
Tec 5 Lonnie C. Amick, MD, 34382609 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 Lon L. Anderson, MD, 13002612 (demoted to Private, 10 January 1944 – transferred to Medical Detachment 184th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, 5 April 1944)
Tec Arnold B. Andrews, MD, 31227904
Tec 5 Duward Bennett, MD, 38233374 (assigned from 10th Replacement Depot, 4 January 1944 – demoted to Private, 15 November 1944)
Tec 5 Armand D. Bergeron, MD, 38106901
Tec 5 Homer C. Britt, MD, 38106901
Tec 5 Harry Bronspiegel, MD, 31205704 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 6 June 1944)
Tec 5 Anthony G. Bruno, MD, 35317917
Tec 5 Harry Caruso, MD, 32619128
Tec 5 Seymour Coopersmith, MD, 32611752 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 5 George F. Crogan, MD, 31130139 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 5 Hubert R. Culver, MD, 13018687
Tec 5 Robert C. Currie, MD, 37211201
Tec 5 George L. J. Dethloff, MD, 38182017
Tec 5 John O. Devlin, MD, 38200246 (demoted to Private, 23 November 1944)
Tec 5 William H. Dowd, MD, 32580455
Tec 5 Raymond L. Edwards, MD, 34420084 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944 – promoted to Technician 3d Grade, 6 June 1944)
Tec 5 Charlie A. Edwards, MD, 35442175
Tec 5 Roy S. Estes, MD, 35671670 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944 – promoted to Technician 3d Grade, 6 June 1944)
Tec 5 Anthony J. Ferragamo, MD, 31099186
Tec 5 Harry L. Fierverker, MD, 13128215
Tec 5 John F. Floyd, MD, 33554068 (assigned from American School Center, 3 September 1944 – demoted to Private, 29 December 1944)
Tec 5 Victor J. Gajdos, MD, 32413679
Tec 5 Arthur J. Gailant, MD, 31266933 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944 – transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 25 September 1944)
Tec 5 William R. Gardner, MD, 35637593
Tec 5 William A. Geles, MD, 33327207
Tec 5 Caspel L. Guinn, MD, 38189355
Tec 5 Milton Gula, MD, 31097305
Tec 5 Alexander K. Hartling, MD, 31273297 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 John M. Helfrick, MD, 32625045
Tec 5 Milton Horn, MD, 31167683
Tec 5 Forrest F. Hough, MD, 39607864
Tec 5 Edward A. James, Jr., MD, 15331114 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 5 Robert L. Johnson, MD, 35668973 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 5 Ignatius L. Klares, MD, 35519846
Tec 5 Donald F. Knapp, MD, 32445378 (demoted to Private, 10 January 1944 – transferred to Headquarters Detachment Eastern District, United Kingdom Base (Medical Section), 29 January 1944)
Tec 5 Walter L. Kuhn, MD, 32383015
Tec 5 Nickolas Lacava, MD, 11009194 (demoted to Private, 16 April 1944 – transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 2 September 1944)
Tec 5 David Leishman, MD, 33274990 (transferred to 163d General Hospital, 6 October 1944)
Tec 5 Tom J. Leo, MD, 32610786
Tec 5 Grady Lester, MD, 38053886 (assigned to American School Center, 20 September 1944)
Tec 5 Hughie T. Lorick, MD, 34382616
Tec 5 Werner K. Luckert, MD, 32297443
Tec 5 Vincent J. Mahoney, 31017136 (demoted to Private, 4 January 1944)
Tec 5 Cleophas A. Marcoux, MD, 31106393 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 5 Fred Marchette, MD, 32618837
Tec 5 Cecil F. Mash, MD, 35508166
Tec 5 Francis B. McGinn, MD, 31148922
Tec 5 William C. McKelvey, MD, 32619091
Tec 5 Louis Mesci, MD, 32635506 (assigned from 65th General Hospital, 18 January 1944)
Tec 5 Joseph A. Michalski, MD, 33028834
Tec 5 James H. Miller, MD, 33497845 (assigned from 65th General Hospital, 18 January 1944)
Tec 5 Nathan Nattman, MD, 32543466
Tec 5 William J. O’Brien, MD, 32748924 (assigned from 65th General Hospital, 18 January 1944)
Tec 5 Francis J. Osenkowski, MD, 31092641 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 5 Peter Panteluk, MD, 31224793 (assigned from 65th General Hospital, 18 January 1944)
Tec 5 Platt M. Phettteplace, MD, 32580369
Tec 5 Escar E. Phillips, MD, 38233130
Tec 5 Steve Popovnak, MD, 35586702
Tec 5 Judson H. Rice, MD, 35424817 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 Clarence A. Riker, Jr., MD, 12199274
Tec 5 Edmund R. Robinson, MD, 32227869 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 6 August 1944)
Tec 5 John W. Rocha, MD, 39394858
Tec 5 Wayne E. Rodenboh, MD, 33344338
Tec 5 Jesus Rodriguez, Sr., MD, 38207243 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 Jerome J. Rohan, MD, 38144060
Tec 5 Joseph V. Sacca, MD, 33583873
Tec 5 Leonard C. Salotti, MD, 33344417

“Army Talks” published by the US Army as part of the Combat Orientation Program. Its purpose was to give the American soldier a psychological preparation for combat and a better understanding of every phase of his military training. At first, emphasis was placed on military orientation, the mental and physical conditioning of the enemy, and a proper evaluation of his weapons and fighting capabilities. Towards the end of 1944 a better understanding of the background of the war and the soldier’s responsibilities in the postwar world were also developed. It was desired that, consistent with operational requirements, group sessions or discussions, through the medium “Army Talks” (free distribution) be held in all units, using at least one hour of training time each week. Its contents served to prepare leaders and men for discussion periods within the unit.

Tec 5 Alfred Salvatore, MD, 35303717
Tec 5 Clifford S. Sampson, MD, 31231048 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 Jesus G. Sanchez, Jr., MD, 38143681 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 5 Clyde C. Schulte, MD, 32579597
Tec 5 Charles F. Scheerle, MD, 33342819 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 Carl F. Schader, MD, 38153183 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 Edward E. Shearman, MD, 32580373
Tec 5 John H. Shirey, Jr., MD, 33447259 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 Anthony S. Sitek, MD, 31062414
Tec 5 Harry Skijus, MD, 35519918 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 John R. Smith, MD, 35455109
Tec 5 Eden L. Snook, MD, 32246590 (assigned from 65th General Hospital, 5 July 1944)
Tec 5 Martin E. Sperie, MD, 35519900 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Tec 5 Harry G. Sydor, MD, 35587638 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 5 Robin P. Tatum, MD, 39528838
Tec 5 Donald N. Thompson, MD, 11106430
Tec 5 William J. Thomas, MD, 33349893
Tec 5 Edmund F. Vetack, MD, 31006383
Tec 5 Lester Vogel, MD, 32655135 (assigned from 10th Replacement Depot, 7 February 1944)
Tec 5 Edwin C. Walters, MD, 34420063 (promoted to Technician 4th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Tec 5 William H. Wilson, MD, 31248550
Tec Sidney M. Young, Jr., MD, 35588282
Pfc Lloyd W. Adams, MD, 38219542
Pfc Victor L. Adams, MD, 39830858
Pfc James P. Amplo, MD, 33370181
Pfc Pedro A. Armendariz, MD, 38124670 (transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 28 September 1944)
Pfc Chester E. Ashcraft, MD, 35668765 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 6 June 1944)
Pfc Robert F. Balise, MD, 31006052 (promoted to Corporal, 8 March 1944)
Pfc Angel F. Becerra, MD, 32313875
Pfc Walter Bergman, MD, 33786761 (assigned from Headquarters Detachment VIII United Kingdom Base, 25 September 1944)
Pfc Henry P. Blackman, MD, 34314995 (transferred to Detachment of Patients 4209 US Army Hospital Plant, 22 September 1944)
Pfc Mike V. Blanco, MD, 38527486
Pfc James C. Bledsoe, MD, 34382876
Pfc Richard Bosma, MD, 32801985
Pfc Normand J. Boulay, MD, 6152197 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 6 June 1944)
Pfc John R. Bradley, MD, 31227906
Pfc Oakley Buck, MD, 35668842
Pfc James S. Burns, MD, 31032438
Pfc Willard F. Burdette, MD, 35742085 (promoted to Corporal, 11 July 1944)
Pfc Theodore Carey, MD, 32611200
Pfc Adrain D. Cardenas, MD, 38251164
Pfc George Chavis, MD, 34386778
Pfc West Dillon, MD, 35440221
Pfc Tulio DiNardi, MD, 310300434
Pfc John J. Dixon, MD, 31074803
Pfc Joseph Dolan, MD, 31002885
Pfc Sylvester Drain, MD, 32076302 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 16 November 1944)
Pfc Ronald V. Edwards, MD, 35668891
Pfc Earle L. Ettinger, MD, 31101515 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pfc Robert E. Fair, MD, 12133686 (transferred to 1st Medical Demonstration Platoon, American School Center, 17 April 1944)
Pfc August Fehsenfeld, MD, 31009191
Pfc John Feiertag, MD, 35519881
Pfc Robert W. Feldmiller, MD, 39393564
Pfc Frederick P. Flynn, MD, 31227841
Pfc Rosemond J. Fortier, MD, 6146562
Pfc Otis L. Furr, MD, 34097954
Pfc Robert A. Galt, MD, 39393496 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Pfc George Georgeff, MD, 35637525 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Pfc Homer J. Glass, MD, 35669022 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pfc Paul Glozik, MD, 13013054 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group 18 August 1944)
Pfc Thomas F. Goecke, MD, 35671675
Pfc Leonard W. Gooden, MD, 14033476 (assigned to Company C Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 20 September 1944)
Pfc John E. Goodwill, MD, 39193170 (transferred to Detachment of Patients 136th Station Hospital, 6 January 1944)
Pfc Bertil M. Granquist, MD, 31067799
Pfc Leonard F. Grant, MD, 6974993 (assigned to Company B Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 20 September 1944)
Pfc Camillus P. Gripshover, MD, 35669115
Pfc William J. Grote, MD, 38197590
Pfc Tyris R. Harris, MD, 34382873
Pfc Osmo Helin, MD, 31062541 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 6 June 1944)
Pfc Norman E. Hence, MD, 34013210 (assigned to Company Z Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 2 September 1944)
Pfc Laddie W. Hruska, MD, 37259877
Pfc Jerome C. Huening, MD, 36668967 (assigned from 184th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, 11 April 1944)
Pfc George L. Huffman, MD, 34598016 (assigned to Company Z Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 11 September 1944)
Pfc Willie Jarvis, MD, 38181981
Pfc Fred B. Jones, MD, 32044703 (demoted to Private 28 December 1944)
Pfc John L. Kast, MD, 39101462 (assigned from 1st Medical Demonstration Platoon,  American School Center, 17 April 1944 – transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 2 September 1944)
Pfc Albert M. Kleinman, MD, 31142301
Pfc Paul A. Lail, MD, 34436285
Pfc Charles D. Leflay, MD, 36590824
Pfc Leonard W. Lieberman, MD, 35011786 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pfc Francis G. Lopat, MD, 31313603 (transferred to Medical Detachment, 241st Ordnance Battalion, 6 June 1944)
Pfc Chester M. Lubelski, MD. 35345964 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 26 June 1944)
Pfc Albino Luera, MD, 38025643 (promoted to Corporal, 6 August 1944)
Pfc George A. MacDonald, MD, 32618963
Pfc William J. MacDonald, MD, 32619003 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Pfc Carlos G. Martinez, MD, 39530120 (demoted to Private, 18 April 1944)
Pfc George H. M. Massey, MD, 31068642 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Pfc Joseph P. Mattingly, MD, 35044129
Pfc John J. McAllen, MD, 31106742
Pfc Earl R. Miller, Jr., MD, 35517125 (assigned to Detachment 44, 314th Replacement Company, Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 18 September 1944)
Pfc Sylvio J. Montville, MD, 31188053 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Pfc John F. Mullen, MD, 31076698
Pfc George E. Murray, Jr., MD, 32879713 (assigned from 65th General Hospital, 18 January 1944)
Pfc Harry S. Orr, MD, 20130227
Pfc Telesphore J. Paquin, MD, 11009811
Pfc Edward W. Parrish, MD, 34537587 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 3 September 1944)
Pfc Charles C. Patridge, MD, 14010931
Pfc Nelson A. Pelletier, Jr., MD, 31009300 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 14 August 1944)
Pfc William H. Penley, MD, 39185420 (transferred to 3618th Quartermaster Truck Company 4 June 1944)
Pfc John M. Popiela, MD, 32554538 (demoted to Private, 12 January 1944)
Pfc Charles I. Reitz, MD, 33256508
Pfc John E. Richards, MD, 31316699 (demoted to Private, 20 April 1944 – transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 20 September 1944)
Pfc Ralph D. Riley, Jr., MD, 34315569 (promoted to Corporal, 21 November 1944)
Pfc Richard A. Rogers, MD, 32635485
Pfc Amadeo Romero, MD, 38166612
Pfc Joseph H. Roth, MD, 12021273 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 14 August 1944)
Pfc Ricardo Salazar, MD, 38144022
Pfc Howard R. Schuyler, MD, 32579414
Pfc Ernest L. Schneider, MD, 11045302
Pfc Jerome F. Schatzberg, MD, 32300367
Pfc John E. Shaffer, MD, 33256467
Pfc Thomas F. Shea, MD, 32580518 (transferred to 3618th Quartermaster Truck Company, 4 June 1944)
Pfc John K. Shillenn, MD, 33491778
Pfc Claude L. Skaggs, MD, 38212431 (demoted to Private, 7 April 1944)
Pfc Willard Smith, MD, 34505658 (assigned to Company A Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 15 September 1944)
Pfc Willis Smith, MD, 34505668 (assigned to Company A Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 15 September 1944)
Pfc Theodor I. Strum, MD, 32806789 (assigned from 10th Replacement Depot, 22 May 1944)
Pfc Pascal R. Tancredi, MD, 32692771 (promoted to Corporal, 10 January 1944)
Pfc Albert Tremblay, MD, 6144216 (transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 7 September 1944)
Pfc Joseph L. Ulmschneider, MD, 31050868
Pfc Henry L. Whisenant, MD, 33454196
Pfc Alvin Whitefield, MD, 331787127 (assigned to Company Z, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 8 September 1944)
Pfc Roland G. Wilson, MD, 32547549 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Pfc Richard J. Worden, MD, 32804077
Pfc Robert J. Worden, MD, 32804119 (promoted to Corporal, 6 August 1944)
Pfc Joseph Yeskewicz, MD, 31258244
Pfc Martin W. Young, MD, 31223847 (transferred to Detachment of Patients, 136th Station Hospital, 6 January 1944)
Pfc Steve Zakala, MD, 32579319
Pvt George J. Ahearn, MD, 31158527
Pvt Ferris J. Andrews, MD, 38475881
Pvt Joseph W. Antolino, MD, 32909993
Pvt Dominic Armano, MD, 32878965 (transferred to Unit Guardhouse, Ordnance Depot O-614, 16 September 1944)
Pvt Ralph Barker, MD, 35741570
Pvt Howard B. Barton, MD, 38475878 (transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 28 September 1944)

A bomber crew casualty is carried into a 3/4-ton ambulance vehicle for evacuation to one of the adjacent Army Hospitals in the United Kingdom.

Pvt Hubert L. Barron, MD, 38476013 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944 – demoted to Private, 31 August 1944)
Pvt Earl E. Belsha, MD, 38475905 (transferred to 3618th Quartermaster Truck Company, 4 June 1944)
Pvt Robert F. Berry, MD, 6769175 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 19 September 1944)
Pvt Ernest C. Blacklock, MD, 33257581
Pvt David W. Boas, MD, 33500775 (transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 2 September 1944)
Pvt Anthony W. Bojak, MD, 32332725 (promoted to Corporal, 5 October 1944)
Pvt William C. Boullier, MD, 31247849
Pvt Peter L. Bovino, MD, 32756035
Pvt Edward Bracey, MD, 38476008
Pvt Albert B. Brown, MD, 35668986 (transferred to 16th Replacement Depot, 28 August 1944)
Pvt Raymond R. Bryant, MD, 38255049 (transferred to 3618th Quartermaster Truck Company, 4 June 1944)
Pvt Maurice Burger, MD, 32879470
Pvt Joseph P. Buzas, MD, 36594421
Pvt Thomas T. Caldwell, MD, 36255536
Pvt Philip R.Cancellate, MD, 32909975 (promoted to Private First Class, 11 January 1944 – transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 2 September 1944)
Pvt Armando J. Carmello, MD, 32900636
Pvt Thomas M. Casey, MD, 32612008 (transferred to Detachment of Patients, 115th Station Hospital, 17 May 1944)
Pvt Frank C.Castagna, MD, 32879126
Pvt Charles H. Childs, Jr., MD, 34766441 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Pvt Daniel A. Cirillo, MD, 33583875
Pvt Roy E. Cleveland, MD, 38494252 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pvt George H. Cochran, MD, 6971822
Pvt Harold E. Costello, MD, 15324418 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 18 August 1944)
Pvt Julian R. Cox, MD, 35135044
Pvt Samuel T. Crear, MD, 31310810 (promoted to Private First Class, 20 March 1944 – promoted to Corporal, 6 August 1944)
Pvt George E. David, MD, 32579385
Pvt Travis B. Davis, MD, 7006858 (transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 7 September 1944)
Pvt Harry C. DeCourcy, MD, 32581646
Pvt Harold R. Dean, MD, 32777316
Pvt Albert Dello Russo, MD, 42003737 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 23 September 1944)
Pvt John Derkacs, MD, 32608966 (promoted to Private First Class, 20 March 1944)
Pvt Damiano C. DiBiasio, MD, 31289500
Pvt Arthur S. Dicker, MD, 32607138
Pvt Harold W. Dice, MD, 32801557 (promoted to Corporal, 8 March 1944 – transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 6 September 1944)
Pvt Leon C. Doane, MD, 33009554 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 20 September 1944)
Pvt Harold Dorsey, MD, 35742080
Pvt William C. Dow, MD, 11017348 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 14 August 1944)
Pvt John P. Duane, MD, 32630680 (transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 16 September 1944)
Pvt Anthony Durso, MD, 32803296
Pvt Winslow H. Dyer, MD, 31317210
Pvt Paul F. Ertman, MD, 33414151 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 29 August 1944)
Pvt Harry E. Evert, MD, 32909613 (transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 20 September 1944)
Pvt Thomas J. Fay, Jr., MD, 32717904
Pvt Joseph Feigin, MD, 12021213 (transferred to Medical Detachment, 241st Ordnance Battalion, 6 June 1944)
Pvt Gerard J. Ferri, MD, 33548020
Pvt Michael Fiordi, MD, 35588490
Pvt Harry S. Fleetwood, MD, 32265403
Pvt John D. Foley, MD, 37657166 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Pvt John Frianciose, MD, 32910017 (transferred to Unit Guardhouse Detachment, Ordnance Depot O-614, 4 September 1944)
Pvt Eugene F. Frey, MD, 38599381 (assigned to Company A, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 27 September 1944)
Pvt Anthony J. Frinzi, MD, 32909619 (promoted to Private First Class, 20 November 1944)
Pvt Salvatore Fuscaldo, MD, 12026037
Pvt Sigmund J. Gac, MD, 32748405
Pvt Francis J. Garbarino, MD, 32805454 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 5 October 1944)
Pvt Gilman B. Gavel, Jr., MD, 11049180 (transferred to 3618th Quartermaster Truck Company, 4 June 1944)
Pvt Stanley E. Gilman, MD, 31144087 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pvt Peter P. Gilligan, MD, 31166606
Pvt Nicola V. Giovanelli, MD, 32801832
Pvt Angelo J. Giordano, MD, 32803609
Pvt Fred Gottlieb, MD, 32311123 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 13 September 1944)
Pvt Samuel Gotch, MD, 33429233
Pvt Leonard C. Graley, MD, 35637590
Pvt Melvin O. Granger, MD, 38488512 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 3 September 1944)
Pvt James R. Graves, MD, 31259747
Pvt Leslie W. Gresham, MD, 38140934
Pvt Lawrence Grimaldi, MD, 31113129
Pvt John L. Guyette, MD, 31199656 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 18 August 1944)
Pvt Lloyd D. Hall, MD, 34420043 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 18 August 1944)
Pvt Myron F. Harmes, MD, 32587312
Pvt Donald L. Hawkins, MD, 35540772
Pvt Donald S. Hollister, MD, 31316666
Pvt Samuel R. Hoots, MD, 34785074 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pvt Doyle L. Hughes, MD, 38475891
Pvt William R. Hutchins, MD, 37667739 (promoted to Private First Class, 20 March 1944 – promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 2 November 1944)
Pvt Clarence E. Ireland, MD, 33669970 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 4 September 1944)
Pvt James I. Jacobs, MD, 13136716
Pvt Robert L. James, MD, 37279669
Pvt Arthur W. Johnson, MD, 33429262
Pvt Tom Johnson, MD, 39848613 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 18 August 1944)
Pvt Peter A. Julius, MD, 31343005 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 24 Augustus 1944)
Pvt John L. Kast, MD, 39101462 (assigned from 1st Medical Demonstration Platoon, American School Center, 17 April 1944 – transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 2 September 1944)
Pvt Ray M. Kelley, MD, 31221915
Pvt Hoover M. Kemp, MD, 35637501 (transferred to Medical Detachment, 241st Ordnance Battalion, 6 June 1944)
Pvt Luther B. Kemble, MD, 38189578 (transferred to 348th Station Hospital, 2 August 1944)
Pvt Stephen J. Kiejna, MD, 31002045 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 10 January 1944)
Pvt John D. Kinnard, MD, 32906058 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pvt John Kowaluk, MD, 32806375
Pvt Stanley P. Kowalczyk, MD, 32912016 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 14 August 1944)
Pvt Robert E. LaRue, MD, 35346088
Pvt Arthur E. Lariviere, MD, 31158230
Pvt John S. Lendvay, MD, 33136820 (transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 25 September 1944)
Pvt Raymond W. Lockard, MD, 35565462
Pvt George L. Lowell, MD, 6139399 (transferred to Detachment of Patients, 136th Station Hospital, 16 January 1944)
Pvt Hyman Lutwin, MD, 42044635 (assigned to Company A, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 23 September 1944)
Pvt Edward L. MacDonald, MD, 31188119
Pvt Frank W. Mahon, MD, 32611370
Pvt Lloyd D. Maikell, MD, 38372657
Pvt Reynaldo Martinez, MD, 32618822
Pvt Arthur Mauri, MD, 31335302 (assigned to 65th General Hospital, 18 January 1944 – transferred to 3618th Quartermaster Truck Company, 4 June 1944)
Pvt Christopher C. May, MD, 39298122 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pvt Raymond C. McCoy, MD, 33512934 (assigned from 65th General Hospital, 18 January 1944)
Pvt James C. McCulley, MD, 34390019
Pvt Marion P. McGregor, MD, 32763255 (assigned from Detachment of Patients, 136th Station Hospital, 4 January 1944 – transferred to Medical Detachment, 241st Ordnance Battalion, 6 June 1944)
Pvt Joseph F. Meany, MD, 31366089 (assigned from 65th General Hospital, 18 January 1944)
Pvt Carlton R. Menzies, MD, 32552416 (promoted to Private First Class, 20 May 1944)
Pvt Anthony P. Messina, MD, 32649384 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pvt Alford J. Michaud, MD, 31031518
Pvt John H. Miller, MD, 31003704
Pvt George Montecalvo, MD, 11020357 (transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 2 October 1944)
Pvt Victor Montuori, MD, 32618128 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 22 August 1944)
Pvt William M. Morris, MD, 33632367
Pvt Roy D. Murphy, MD, 37061161
Pvt Carmine Pepe, MD, 32808754
Pvt Lloyd S. Percy, MD, 39391233 (promoted to Private First Class, 11 January 1944)
Pvt Sidney L. Phillips, MD, 13014755 (promoted to Private First Class, 10 June 1944)
Pvt Kenneth J. Pietrasko, MD, 32786262
Pvt Nick Podojak, Jr., MD, 35875845 (assigned to Company B, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 20 September 1944)
Pvt Alexander C. Ramirez, MD, 39574281 (transferred to Detachment of Patients, 67th General Hospital, 7 June 1944)
Pvt William D. Rand, MD, 11014398 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 18 August 1944)
Pvt Otto C. Rauber, MD, 32548765 (transferred to 2d Replacement Depot, 13 September 1944)
Pvt Rosario Ravalli, MD, 32801958
Pvt William J. Rice, MD, 37562792
Pvt Kent Rich, MD, 39906363
Pvt Joseph J. Robinson, MD, 33358727
Pvt Anthony J. Romano, MD, 32802809
Pvt James F. Rowan, MD, 32922739 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 29 August 1944)
Pvt Albert Royer, MD, 31259871 (transferred to 1st Medical Demonstration Platoon, American School Center, 17 April 1944)
Pvt Woodrow Sam, MD, 38128636 (transferred to 538th Quartermaster Group, 18 August 1944)
Pvt John Savich, MD, 12199282 (transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 2 September 1944)
Pvt Raymond H. Savidge, MD, 32755986 (transferred 16th Replacement Depot, 28 August 1944)
Pvt Henry J. Schmucker, MD, 38211589 (promoted to Corporal, 14 April 1944)
Pvt William L. Scott, MD, 32747480 (promoted to Private First Class, 20 March 1944 – promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 6 June 1944)
Pvt Eddie J. Seaman, MD, 32748202
Pvt Joseph Servis, MD, 32756083
Pvt Theodore A. Shank, MD, 33428543
Pvt Franklin B. Shoemaker, MD, 37422653
Pvt Myron B. Siwek, MD, 32266202 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 29 August 1944)
Pvt Maurice J. Skerry, MD, 31091736
Pvt Clarence Stewart, MD, 34315520
Pvt Arcoline J. Sticco, MD, 31043514
Pvt John J. Sullivan, MD, 31003670 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 5 April 1944)
Pvt Michal J. Sweeney, MD, 32801022 (transferred to Detachment of Patients, 4101 US Army Hospital Plant, 27 June 1944)
Pvt Oner Taylor, MD, 34578078
Pvt Paul D. Tempesta, MD, 31297954 (transferred to 3618th Quartermaster Truck Company, 4 June 1944)
Pvt Louis M. Thacker, MD, 13014845 (transferred to 3618th Quartermaster Truck Company, 4 June 1944)
Pvt Eugene V. Thornesberry, MD, 39849717
Pvt Alonzo E. Tidwell, MD, 37067380 (assigned to Company B, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 29 August 1944)
Pvt John Toth, MD, 32453864 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944)
Pvt James G. Trammell, MD, 38568632 (assigned to Company C, Detachment 1 (Provisional),  Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 29 August 1944)
Pvt William J. Trocciola, MD, 32530150 (promoted to Private First Class, 20 March 1944 – transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 2 September 1944)
Pvt Rodney C. Truitt, MD, 34585544
Pvt Willet Underhill, Jr., MD, 32109631 (promoted to Private First Class, 20 March 1944)
Pvt John J. Uschan, Jr., MD, 36223531 (promoted to Technician 5th Grade, 8 March 1944 – transferred to 12th Replacement Depot, 25 September 1944)
Pvt Andrew P. Vaudrevil, MD, 31074838
Pvt Hiram C. Vaughn, MD, 32754455 (promoted to Private First Class, 10 June 1944)
Pvt Tom R. Walters, MD, 34389717 (assigned to Company A, Detachment 1 (Provisional), Ground Forces Reinforcement Station, 11 September 1944)
Pvt Ralph J. Williams, MD, 33556978
Pvt William J. Willoughby, MD, 34682300 (transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 2 September 1944)
Pvt James T. Wimpee, MD, 38435287
Pvt Zenon A. Wisniewski, MD, 36125817 (promoted to Private First Class, 21 November 1944)
Pvt Edman L. Wright, MD, 38476225 (transferred to 11th Replacement Depot, 9 September 1944)

Religious Services:
Roman Catholic Services – 489 (20,429 attendances)
Protestant Services – 116 (5,841 attendances)
Hebrew Services – 59 (1,000 attendances)

Unit Awards:
The following awards were made to patients of the 136th Station Hospital during 1944:

1,212 Purple Hearts for wounds sustained in battle
102 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters to the Purple Heart

Example of Unit Commendation awarded to the 136th Station Hospital.

The following awards were made to the Enlisted Men of the Medical Department Detachment:

215 Army Good Conduct Ribbons
13 Driver Badges
1 Driver and Mechanic Badge and Bar

United Kingdom (1945):

Staff and Personnel:
The initial Commanding Officer for the period was Colonel George E. Lindow, MC, O-10845. He was assisted by Lt. Colonel Jay F. Havice, MC, O-486872, (XO) from 1 January 1945 to 5 February 1945, and later by Lt. Colonel Adam J. Rapalski, MC, O-399728, who became the new Executive Officer from 18 March 1945 to 9 May 1945. Captain Clarence E. Mc Keown, MAC, O-1541511, took over on 31 August 1945.

Lt. Colonel Walter R. Limbaugh, MC, O-131457, (previously XO > 7th General Hospital –ed) joined the 136th Sta Hosp, 5 August 1945, succeeding Colonel George E. Lindow as Commanding Officer, who was transferred to the 302d Station Hospital, effective 11 August 1945.
Other Staff Officers included: Second Lieutenant Joseph A. Pastore, MAC, O-2011237 (S-1) Adjutant & Personnel Section Officer + (S-2) Military Intelligence Officer; First Lieutenant Walter F. Thayer, MAC, O-1543569 (S-3) Operations & Training Officer; First Lieutenant Morris Lipetz, MAC, O-1542686 (S-4) Supply & Evacuation Officer; and Captain Helen M. Thomae, ANC, N-701793, Principal Chief Nurse.

Personnel strength at 1 January 1945 was: 39 Officers – 61 Nurses – 1 Warrant Officer – 1 Physiotherapist – 1 Hospital Dietitian – and 367 Enlisted Men. There were 2 Chaplains in the 136th. In August 1945 the Chiefs of the different services were: Lt. Colonel Ralph D. Richardson, MC, O-1696223, Chief of Surgical Service; Lt. Colonel George L. Hardgrove, MC, O-1693321, Chief of Medical Service; Major Don T. McKee, DC, O-352246, Chief of Dental Service; Captain Peter Zanca, MC, O-369962, Chief of X-Ray Service; Captain Walter J. Lyons, SnC, O-501196, Chief of Laboratory Service; Captain Helen M. Thomae, ANC, N-721793, Chief of Nursing Service; Captain Martin J. O’Donnell, ChC, O-499055, Chaplain.

On 10 March 1945, the 1367th Labor Supervision Company was attached to the Post under the command of Captain Harold L. Pratt, Infantry, O-1287941, and 7 EM. A barbed wire fence was erected by a squad from the 861st Engineer Aviation Battalion. 34 Enlisted Men of the Hospital were placed on TD to act as guards for the Eastern District PW Detachment. They were therefore adequately trained in the use of the .30 M1 carbine and instructed to remove all medical insignia and GC brassards in accordance with the current Geneva Convention and Army Regulations. Two German-speaking NCOs were also attached for full duty as liaison. Authorized T/O was generally in accordance with T/O & E 8-560, amended, 28 October 1944.

A prison enclosure and stockade were built in the northeast sector of the Hospital grounds including a small dispensary for the care of sick or wounded German PWs. A first shipment of 82 German Prisoners of War belonging to the 8297th Labor Service Unit arrived 19 March 1945. Upon arrival they were used on all labor details within the Post confines and helped construct the buildings and facilities of the stockade. The number of prisoners was later increased to 180. A separate ward tent was set up for use as a hospital.

As per instructions from Headquarters, United Kingdom Base, dated 6 April 1945, the following cellular units were attached to the 136th Station Hospital:

253d Finance Disbursement Section  (2 men)
281st Medical Mess Detachment (2 men)
434th Military Police Patrol Detachment (3 men)
435th Military Police Patrol Detachment (3 men)
1135th Army Postal Unit Type “A” (2 men)
4002d Signal Switchboard Operator Detachment (1 man)

On 9 May 1945, 40 Officers and 1 attached Officer comprised the Officer personnel. Up to 1 September, 72 Officers were assigned to the unit and 64 transfers occurred. 60 Nurses, 2 Hospital Dietitians, and 1 Physiotherapist comprised the female Officer complement. A further 102 assignments and 74 transfers were to take place. Re-assignment and re-deployment of personnel having been accomplished in an orderly and efficient manner, the following staff were now assigned to the unit:

Lt. Colonel Walter R. Limbaugh, MC, O-131457 (Commanding Officer)
Captain George Staruch, Jr., MAC, O-1533204 (Executive Officer)
1st Lieutenant James W. Bennett, MAC, O-1545807 (Adjutant + S-2 Military Intelligence)
Chief Warrant Officer Wilbur R. Key, USA, W-2113645 (S-1 Personnel Section)
Captain Ernest F. Jones, MAC, O-1533594 (S-3 Operations & Training)
1st Lieutenant George W. Book, MAC, O-377176 (S-4 Supply & Evacuation)
Major Harry W. Bradley, MC, O-466956 (Chief of Surgical Service)
Lt. Colonel Adolph R. Mueller, MC, O-258180 (Chief of Medical Service)
Captain Helen M. Thomae, ANC, N-721793 (Chief of Nursing Service)
Captain George W. I. Kutz, ChC, O-525789 (Protestant Chaplain)
(both Officer and Nurse personnel were completely screened and reassigned except for the Commanding Officer, the Principal Chief Nurse, 9 other Nurses, and 1 MAC Officer. All Officers had a minimum of 85 points – at 15 August 1945 – and all Enlisted Men a minimum of 70 points, at the same period).

Location:
The 136th Station Hospital remained located at Acton Place, Sudbury, Suffolk, for the duration of 1945. A total of 71 air raid alerts were recorded between 1 January 1945 and 31 March 1945. No bombs fell in the immediate vicinity of the Hospital.

General Operations:
Since 1 January 1945, the Medical and Surgical Services held formal ward rounds each week and follow-up meetings of the combined services each month. Daily conferences between the Commanding Officer and the Chiefs of Services were continued.
11 Hospital Trains were routed to the Hospital’s railroad receiving point at Sudbury, Suffolk, and a total of 2,090 patients received. Outpatients treated totaled 3,289 with 4,494 treatments performed. 3,039 patients were admitted to the Hospital. Classifications included 1,734 diseases, 330 injuries, and 975 battle casualties.
A total of 1,073 surgical operations were performed during the 1945 period.

During the first six months of operation, from 1 January through 30 June 1945, 4 new cases of gonorrhea and 1 new case of syphilis were reported.
Surgical services: 1,945 admissions were noted of which 1,005 were battle casualties. Treatments performed consisted of 383 major operations, 774 minor operations, and 677 plaster casts applications.  During the period, 1,440 surgical patients were discharged to duty and 1,016 were transferred to General Hospitals or the Zone of Interior. Three deaths occurred during surgery.
Medical Services: 1,822 admissions were noted. During the same period, 1,362 medical patients were discharged to duty and 458 were evacuated to the Zone of Interior. Two deaths were reported.
Dental services: 2,668 admissions were noted, with 6,477 sittings and 1,179 fillings duly reported.
Laboratory services: the number of contributions totaled 19, 036.

Another example of a Unit Commendation awarded to the Hospital for its treatment of Air Force Personnel.

The unit’s training and patient convalescent and rehabilitation training continued throughout the period in accordance with directions from Headquarters. Special Services and American Red Cross provided social and recreational activities. Motion pictures were shown three times daily in the theater and twice daily on a ward. Dances, parties, tours, entertainments, concerts, off-Post dances were organized and held on a regular basis. With the advent of warmer weather, volleyball, tennis, baseball, and athletics thrived.

Formal inspections were conducted by the 136th CO and/or designated Officers. Inspectors delegated by higher Headquarters carried out monthly routine inspections. Major General H. B. Vaughan, CG United Kingdom Base, made a formal inspection of the Post on 15 March 1945. Average rating was excellent with no gross discrepancies found. Morale remained excellent throughout the period.

Medical and Quartermaster supplies and equipment were received on requisition and were adequate, although the closing of additional depots in the UK since early January affected the availability and required longer hauls. Since 21 May 1945, the tented expansion was taken down and the extra tentage returned to the depots. Excess supplies and conservation of materials were handled according to the directives of higher Headquarters.
Available transportation consisted of 6 ¾-ton Dodge ambulances, 6 British Austin ambulances, 2 2½-ton cargo trucks, 1 1½-ton  truck, 1 1½-ton  dump truck, 3 ¾-ton weapon carriers, 3 ¼-ton trucks, 1 command truck, 1 British Hillman sedan, 1 British Leland bus, 2 250-gallon water trailers, 1 ½-ton cargo trailer.

Awards and Commendations: patients received 419 Purple Hearts and 77 Oak Leaf Clusters. Enlisted personnel of the 136th were awarded 18 Good Conduct Medals and 6 Driver Badges with Bar.

A Letter of Commendation, dated 18 March 1945, was received from Headquarters Eastern District, United Kingdom Base, Communications Zone, APO 559, United States Army (as a result of the successful visit by Major General H. B. Vaughan, Commander, United Kingdom Base. Another Letter of Commendation, dated 16 April 1945, was received from Headquarters, United States Strategic Air Forces in Europe (USSAFE), signed by General Carl A. Spaatz, commending the 136th Station Hospital for the medical care furnished Air Force personnel.

1945 Resume:
Since V-E Day, 8 May 1945, the 136th Station Hospital continued to fulfil its mission of caring for the sick and wounded casualties of World War 2. No more Hospital Trains from the continent were received but a large number of patients came in from the 7th General – 49th Station – 163d General – 280th Station Hospitals. The patient census decreased progressively as more and more patients were returned to the ZI and to duty.
The Hospital was notified by telephone on 21 August 1945 to close its reception of patients. The 30 remaining casualties were immediately transferred to the 65th General Hospital on the following day. The organization was alerted 28 August 1945for movement from the United Kingdom / European Theater of Operations on or about 4 September 1945. The process of closing all departments was put in operation. A Detachment pertaining to the 805th Hospital Center already arrived 27 August to complete the process of closing and the packing and shipping of all supplies to the respective depots.
Orders were received for the organization to leave the United Kingdom on 28 September 1945.


Our most sincere thanks go to our regular contributor Lynn McNulty, son of Captain Frederick J. McNulty (O-526873) who once more, generously provided the MRC staff with a number of World War 2 Annual Reports relating to the operation of the 136th Station Hospital in the European Theater. Additional Reports detailing the unit’s activities in 1944 and 1945 were received from Cynde Lee, daughter of 1st Lt. Evangeline Blauvelt (N-751717) who served with the Hospital in the UK. The authors are still looking for additional period  illustrations of subject unit. Thank you.

 

This page was printed from the WW2 US Medical Research Centre on 23rd October 2018 at 16:36.
Read more: https://www.med-dept.com/unit-histories/136th-station-hospital/