27th Evacuation HospitalUnit History

Copy of hand drawn map prepared by the Special Service Section, illustrating the geographic history of the 27th Evacuation Hospital. Courtesy UIC

Introduction & Activation:

As a part of the war program of the University of Illinois, the Chicago Colleges of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmacy, including Rush Medical College, requested permission on April 24, 1942, to organize an affiliated US Army Evacuation Hospital. Dr. Charles B. Puestow, Associate Professor of Surgery, who had been active in advocating such an organization, was nominated by University officials to be the Unit Director.
Among the first to apply were 13 Doctors, all whom later became Officers of the new Hospital Unit.

The Adjutant General approved the University’s application on May 28, 1942, authorizing the organization of the 27th Evacuation Hospital in accordance with the Surgeon General’s Letter of March 2, 1942, Subject: “Affiliated Units, Medical Department, US Army.”
Dr. Charles B. Puestow, was eventually commissioned Lieutenant Colonel, MC, O-267687, AUS, on June 15, 1942, and assumed the duties of Unit Director. On the basis of T/O 8-232, dated October 1, 1942, he recruited 41 additional Officers from among several hundred applicants. With the aid of Miss Edna B. Groppe, Acting Director of Cook County School of Nursing, the entire complement of 52 Nurses was recruited in six weeks with a large reserve for any possible vacancies. Miss Edna B. Groppe became Chief Nurse (1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-744145), while Miss Rhoda E. Frid (2d Lieutenant, ANC, N-744164) was named Assistant Chief Nurse.

The 27th Evacuation Hospital was officially activated at Camp Breckinridge, Morganfield, Kentucky (Infantry Division Camp; total acreage 36,070; troop capacity 2,031 Officers and 42,092 Enlisted Men –ed), October 15, 1942, with the Officers, Nurses, and Enlisted Men of the affiliated group and the Officers and EM of the 42d Evacuation Hospital, which was disbanded on the same date in compliance with General Order # 9, Headquarters Camp Breckinridge, Kentucky, dated October 15, 1942, pursuant to, War Department, Adjutant General Office, Restricted Letter, A.G. 320.2 (October 6, 1942) OB-I-SP-M, dated October 9, 1942 (the 42d Evac Hosp, originally activated 1 Jun 41, was disbanded and supplied Enlisted personnel to both the 27th Evac Hosp and the 77th Evac Hosp, which were to serve overseas –ed).

The Officers, Nurses, and Enlisted personnel of the affiliated group joined the new organization in groups from October 15 to November 11, 1942. Individuals assignments followed throughout December of 1942.

Organization & Training:

During the period July 7 to October 15, 1942, while personnel for the new Hospital unit was being selected, regular weekly meetings with appropriate programs and films were well attended by the newly commissioned Officers and Nurses. The Officers drilled regularly at these meetings. Clerical facilities and office space, supplies and services, were furnished by the University. One of the most instructive portions of the early training program was a day spent at Camp Grant, Rockford, Illinois (Medical Replacement Unit Training Center –ed), where Medical / Surgical Officers and the Chief Nurse were guests of Major General John M. Willis, MC, who had arranged a schedule of demonstrations, conferences, and talks that helped to orient the Officers.
On September 12, 1942, Lt. Colonel C. B. Puestow, MC, O-267687, reported to the Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, for extended active duty. Other MC Officers assigned to extended active duty were:

  • Colonel Robert M. Jones, MC, O-177877
  • Major Oscar E. Nadeau, MC, O-486269
  • Major William E. Redlich, DC, O-496499
  • Captain James W. Lewis, MC, O-344247

In view of the forthcoming activation of the unit, personnel in Chicago had started their immunization program at the Illinois Research Hospital where Captain George V. Byfield, MC, O-483088, and Captain Lawrence Breslow, MC, O-489573, gave inoculations and vaccinations at weekly intervals.

Vintage ZI Recruiting Card, illustrating unloading of a patient at an Evacuation Hospital.

Vintage ZI Recruiting Card, illustrating unloading of a patient at an Evacuation Hospital.

Individual training of Officers, Nurses, and Enlisted Men, was the main concern of the new organization. A Detachment was therefore set up in 6 Companies on barracks basis with Officers acting as Company Commanders and Platoon Leaders under the direction of the Detachment CO. Officers and Nurses were regularly used as instructors. A definite Training Program was developed with weekly schedules in accordance with the general MTP.

The 41 Officers enlisted by Lt. Colonel C. B. Puestow from the University of Illinois Staff included 24 for the Surgical Service – 6 for the Medical Service – 2 for the X-Ray Service – 1 for the Laboratory Service – 3 for the Dental Service – and 5 for the Administration. All were released by the University on leaves of absence for military service. The range in age varied from 19 to 47.
This group was joined by the 8 Officers and 1 Warrant Officer of the disbanded 42d Evacuation Hospital.
Lt. Colonel Harvey F. Hendrickson, MC, O-17339, who had been in command of the 42d Evac Hosp, was assigned as Commanding Officer, 27th Evacuation Hospital, October 15, 1942. The other Officers were:

  • Captain Walter J. Hendricks, MC, O-1695964
  • Captain John B. Lavender, MC, O-219031
  • Captain Richard T. Stephenson, MC, O-488488
  • 1st Lieutenant Anthony J. Pellicane, MC, O-306191
  • 2d Lieutenant Harold M. Bergersen, QMC, O-1575738
  • 2d Lieutenant Paul J. Krug, MAC, O-1533835
  • Warrant Officer, Junior Grade John H. Gaut, AUS, W-2103714

The same day, Lt. Colonel Charles B. Puestow, MC, O-267687, was appointed Executive Officer of the Hospital. He would assume command of this Hospital on June 24, 1943, when Colonel H. F. Hendrickson was hospitalized.

Under the direction of 1st Lieutenant Edna B. Groppe, ANC, N-744145, and with the aid of the other Officers, 51 Nurses were recruited from general and private duty sources. The majority came from the Sixth Service Command area in or near Chicago. Their previous training and experience was sufficiently diversified to assure well qualified nursing personnel for all phases of evacuation hospital care and treatment.

Since its activation the unit went through a daily training schedule which was strictly adhered to. The program consisted of regular drill, road marches, training films, field instruction, pitching and erection of tentage, lectures and instructions on bandaging, treatment of wounds and fractures, care of the sick and wounded, gas mask drills, and protection against chemical warfare. In addition, training aids in the form of sand tables, charts, model maps, and training films were used extensively in class work. Special training was given to Medical and Surgical Technicians at the station hospital, Camp Breckinridge, where the organization took over the care of several wards, with their own command staff in charge Some Officers and EM were being sent to Special Army Schools for additional specialized training.
Mobilization Training Program tests were held on December 28 and 29, 1942, with the unit passing Second United States Army Inspection in a very satisfactory manner.

By the end of December 1942, the Hospital had received about ½ of its basic medical supplies and approximately 65% of its organizational equipment. Individual equipment had been issued to the extent of 75%. Securing the proper clothing for 52 ANC Officers proved difficult.
Vehicles were also being assigned as provided by T/O 8-580, with some small exception.
December 31, 1942, the 27th Evacuation Hospital’s strength consisted of 57 Officers and 52 ANC Officers.

Scenes illustrating Fort Devens, Ayer, Massachusetts. Left: formation ready for drill in front of one of the large buildings at Fort Devens, 1940-1941. Right: aerial view of “Vicksburg Square”, Fort Devens 1942.

Scenes illustrating Fort Devens, Ayer, Massachusetts. Left: formation ready for drill in front of one of the large buildings at Fort Devens, 1940-1941. Right: aerial view of “Vicksburg Square”, Fort Devens 1942.

1943
For 5½ months of 1943, the 27th operated a Hospital in 3 different Maneuver areas where over 3,600 cases were treated. In general, training, bivouacs, and preparations for overseas movement kept the organization busy for the rest of the year. During the months of January and February 1943, the bulk of the Medical Supply items were received and stored, while organizational property came in small quantities. Between January and March 1943, two-thirds of the ANC Officers worked in the camp’s station hospital, where they were in complete charge of nursing services of 6 wards, staffed by the unit. They provided classes to Enlisted Men, teaching them nursing procedures. During this particular aspect of build-up and training, the entire organization was bivouacked in an area about 4 miles from the camp proper (all personnel lived under field conditions, with Enlisted personnel sleeping in pup tents, being fed from a mess tent, and taking their meals outdoor; after some delay a field hot shower was improvised). In the meantime, several men were sent to OCS, requiring some reorganization of the Supply Department. In March, Inspection Team No. 3, Headquarters, Second US Army, reported “very satisfactory”, and later the whole unit passed a Physical Fitness Test with very satisfactory scores as well. For reasons of safety, all personnel fired some familiarization rounds with the .45 caliber automatic pistol and completed the infiltration course on the range at Camp Breckinridge. After spending the winter on bivouac, the Hospital was alerted about March 15 for a possible overseas movement. The movement, however, proved to be to the Tennessee Maneuvers instead of overseas. The 27th subsequently moved to Scottsville, Kentucky, where it spent 2 months operating, gaining experience, and anticipating needs of the organization. During the above period the organization cared for over 1,000 patients, most of which were transferred from 2 semi-mobile 400-bed Evacuation Hospitals which alternated on the weekly tactical problems. Any evacuation from the 27th went to either Camp Forrest, Tullahoma, Tennessee station hospital (Infantry Division Camp –ed) or to a Convalescent Hospital.
In June 1943 a new T/O had become effective, allowing for several increases in rank for Officer personnel and an increase in technical grades for EM along with a decrease in section grades. Provisions were also made for a realignment of Teams in Surgery. Changes in Enlisted personnel included some reclassifications, 52 assignments, 16 replacements to other units, discharge of men over 38 years old, and other special cases. Officer changes included the loss of all of the training group from the 42d Evacuation Hospital, the transfer of 2 Officers of the original affiliated group, and the temporary presence of several MAC Officers.

Going through more reorganizations, the unit finally received the largest part of its equipment during the months of July and August 1943. Movement orders followed once more, and this time everyone packed for another Maneuver. When ordered to the West Virginia Maneuver area from Camp Breckinridge in September 1943, the unit left the Second United States Army and was assigned to XIII Corps. Upon arriving on site, the 27th took over completely an operating hospital (this was the 44th Evacuation Hospital –ed) which had been alerted for overseas movement. This was done successfully after they had moved out, their equipment was packed and parts of it sent to the 110th Evacuation Hospital in Texas, and the balance turned in to the Medical Depot at Elkins, West Virginia. During the West Virginia Maneuver, the unit operated a 250-bed hospital in Stuart Memorial Park, approximately six miles from Elkins. Ward tents were winterized, Enlisted Men were quartered in pyramidal tents, and Officers in small wall tents. A shower bath was set up in a ward tent. Hauling water sometimes caused problems.

In November of 1943, it was possible to send a detachment comprising some 120 Medical Officers, Nurses, and Enlisted Men to A. P. Hill Military Reservation, Fredericksburg, Virginia (Maneuver Area –ed) for a special assignment involving the establishment of a 150-bed Evacuation Hospital, without overloading the staff that remained in bivouac.

Picture illustrating USS “General William Mitchell”, AP-114, which carried the 27th Evacuation Hospital’s ANC contingent to North Africa. The ship’s destination was Oran, Algeria.

Picture illustrating USS “General William Mitchell”, AP-114, which carried the 27th Evacuation Hospital’s ANC contingent to North Africa. The ship’s destination was Oran, Algeria.

It may be concluded that during 1943, the overall ward service functioned actively. During the Tennessee Maneuvers, it operated from April 18 to June 20, 1943; and in the West Virginia Maneuver Area, the unit successfully operated from September 19 to December 31, 1943. The balance of the time the unit spent in training without patients, the ward service did not function.

Organization of Headquarters – 27th Evacuation Hospital
(period January 1, 1943 to December 31, 1943)
Colonel Harvey F. Hendrickson, MC, O-17339, Commanding Officer (1 Jan 43 > 24 Jun 43)
Lt. Colonel Charles B. Puestow, MC, O-267687, Executive Officer (1 Jan 43 > 22 Apr 43) + Chief Surgical Service (22 Apr 43 > 24 Jun 43) + Commanding Officer (24 Jun 43 > 31 Dec 43)
Major Howard I. Down, MC, O-486274, Executive Officer (9 Oct 43 > 31 Dec 43) + General Surgeon (1 Jan 43 > 31 Dec 43)
1st Lieutenant James H. Bone, MAC, O-498668, Adjutant (1 Jan 43 > 31 Dec 43)
2d Lieutenant Paul J. Krug, MAC, O-1533835, Assistant Adjutant (1 Jan 43 > 25 Mar 43)
2d Lieutenant Neil W. Hansen, MAC, O-1544283, Assistant Personnel Officer (7 Feb 43 > 26 Feb 43)
Captain Charles E. Neff, ChC, O-503396, Chaplain (1 Jan 43 > 12 Nov 43)
1st Lieutenant Mark J. Linenberg, ChC, O-434986, Chaplain (28 Jul 43 > 9 Oct 43)
1st Lieutenant Thomas H. Harvey, ChC, O-526368, Chaplain (20 Nov 43 > 31 Dec 43)
1st Lieutenant Edna B. Groppe, ANC, N-744145, Chief Nurse (1 Jan 43 > 30 Apr 43)
Captain Rhoda E. Frid, ANC,N-744164, Principal Chief Nurse (30 Apr 43 > 31 Dec 43)
1st Lieutenant Dorothy Harshfield, ANC, N-745092, Assistant Chief Nurse (23 Jul 43 > 31 Dec 43)
1st Lieutenant Betty Hull, ANC, N-731617, Assistant Chief Nurse (23 Jul 43 > 31 Dec 43)
1st Lieutenant Anna M. Johnson, ANC, N-731618, Assistant Chief Nurse (23 Jul 43 > 31 Dec 43)
1st Lieutenant Arlene F. McKercher, ANC, N-744559, Assistant Chief Nurse (23 Jul 43 > 31 Dec 43)

1944
On January 31, 1944, orders were received to prepare for movement to Fort Devens, Ayer, Massachusetts (Military Reservation –ed). Within 48 hours the Hospital was struck, packed, and loaded for movement by rail. All remaining patients were transferred to the 630th Medical Clearing Company which took over the hospital functions. A total of 2,096 patients had been treated by the unit during the West Virginia Maneuvers, which added to the admissions during the Tennessee Maneuvers, made a total of 4,039 patients, all treated under tentage and field conditions. Many lessons were learned, thereby making the Hospital more adaptable to combat conditions. The relationship with XIII Corps Headquarters, while set up near Elkins, West Virginia, was most pleasant and expressed in an official Letter of Commendation, dated February 24, 1944.
It must be noted that the Hospital did not function from February 1 until May 22, 1944, when it set up in Italy.

Preparation for Overseas Movement:

The 6 weeks spent at Fort Devens, were very busy. All clothing and equipment had to be inspected, much replaced or repaired, and the organizational equipment packed and crated for overseas shipment. The splendid cooperation and help of Colonel Luther Judson, CO, 1st Detachment Special Troops, XIII Corps, made this task both simple and pleasant. All preparations were completed prior to the readiness date which allowed the organization to relax and enjoy the many diversions offered in Boston. Having been isolated in the mountains for many weeks such facilities offered by a big city were most welcome.

On March 21, still wading through snow almost knee-deep, the Nurses and the Dietitian boarded Pullman cars to precede the unit to Camp Patrick Henry, Oriana, Virginia (Staging Area for Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation –ed) where they arrived March 23. Sunday, March 26, was spent in sorting and packing belongings, and on Monday morning the ANC contingent entrained for the pier under a downpour and after waiting for 2 hours. After boarding the USS “General William Mitchell”, AP-114, which was to sail alone, the party finally left port on Tuesday morning, 1000 hours, March 27, 1944. They would only rejoin the parent unit at Oran, Algeria, next April.
The remainder of the 27th Evac Hosp left Fort Devens, Massachusetts, March 25, 1944, by Pullman.
The few days spent at the Staging Area were dull and uneventful, and everyone seemed happy to board the Liberty Ship USAT “John S. Sargent” on April 1 for the long awaited trip overseas. It was a unique experience to sail in a convoy of 117 Liberty Ships and their escort vessels. The entire crossing proved uneventful, except for two days of rough weather causing some seasickness, and the Mediterranean was entered when an air alert was sounded, but no bombing took place. On April 19, 1944, 23 ships, including the “John Sargent” arrived off Oran, in Algeria.

Picture illustrating USAHS “Seminole”, which transported the entire 27th Evacuation Hospital from Algeria to Naples, Italy.

Picture illustrating USAHS “Seminole”, which transported the entire 27th Evacuation Hospital from Algeria to Naples, Italy.

North Africa:

The ANC Officers had meanwhile reached Camp “Dushane”, a Staging Area for newly landed troops, near Casablanca, French Morocco. They left on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1944, on their way to Algeria, in an old and comfortless hospital train, which was to stop at Oran (instead of Algiers), where Army trucks would be waiting.
Following debarkation at Oran, Algeria, the group was transported to Staging Area No. 2, situated at Hassi-Ben-Okba, known as “Goat Hill”. No more desolate spot could be found for a bivouac site. It was hot and the constant wind kept the air filled with impenetrable dust which covered everything, including the food. Dust penetrated clothing, personal effects, tents and beds. Fortunately, excellent bathing facilities in the Mediterranean were available near Lion Mountain for the Enlisted Men, while the male Officers were accorded the use of the beach at Aïn-et-Turk, (a resort village overlooking the Mediterranean, west of Oran –ed) where the Nurses were stationed.
The Hospital spent 3 weeks at Oran, which gave the command time to recheck the equipment and requisition the additional items authorized by NATOUSA. After reassembly, the complete organizational equipment was checked, packed, and crated and ordered loaded on a Liberty Ship on May 9, 1944 for transportation to Italy.

The same day, the entire personnel were given a mere 3 hours to assemble and board the USAHS “Seminole”. The comfortable quarters and excellent food on the Hospital Ship made the 60-hour trip to Naples, Italy, most pleasant. As the 27th debarked from the “Seminole”, they were met by Colonel Lee D. Cady, Commanding Officer, 21st General Hospital (arrived in North Africa 6 Dec 42 –ed), who was also in command of the Naples Medical Center. With only a few hours’ notice he had provided excellent facilities to house and feed the entire personnel.

Italy:

At 2300 hours, May 12, 1944, the day of the unit’s arrival at Naples, the big Allied Offensive started which was intended to push the lines from Monte Cassino to Pisa. The enemy was not inactive that night, and the Hospital experienced the biggest air raid of the year. This was the organization’s early baptism of war, and everyone was vividly impressed by the numerous lights and explosions. The 750-bed 27th Evac had been tabbed for an ultimate role with Seventh United States Army in France, but was now attached to the Peninsular Base Section (PBS) who desired to use it in the Naples area. It was established in a field on the western outskirts of Maddaloni to act as a General Hospital for regular French and French colonial troops, and would soon be operating 1500 beds. Since the entire hospital equipment was not expected for at least a week, a 250-bed expansion unit was drawn while the area was laid out and 8 prefab buildings, a number of ward tents, and semi-permanent sanitary facilities and kitchens were erected with the help of the 345th Engineer General Service Regiment (arrived in French Morocco 19 Feb 43, landed in Italy 3 Oct 43 –ed). The entire personnel moved to the new hospital site on May 15, and started admitting the first French colonial casualties May 22, 1944. That same night, the organizational equipment arrived from North Africa, allowing the unit to expand to 1500 beds. The patient census rose dramatically reaching up to 1,467 patients (the record stood at 557 patients in a single day). Working long hours without relief, the Hospital finally received some additional help from 30 Nurses on TD from the 64th General Hospital (arrived in North Africa 4 Sep 43 –ed) which at that time was not in operation. Unfortunately, the extra Nurses only stayed for thirty-six hours.

 Different scenes illustrating the Maddaloni, Italy, setup where the 27th Evacuation Hospital remained from May 15 until August 2, 1944. Left: partial view of ward tents. Center: Nurses attend patients in one of the post-operative wards. Right: aerial view of the site where the the Hospital was established, and started receiving casualties as from May 22, 1944. Courtesy UIC.

Different scenes illustrating the Maddaloni, Italy, setup where the 27th Evacuation Hospital remained from May 15 until August 2, 1944. Left: partial view of ward tents. Center: Nurses attend patients in one of the post-operative wards. Right: aerial view of the site where the the Hospital was established, and started receiving casualties as from May 22, 1944. Courtesy UIC

Station in Italy – 27th Evacuation Hospital
Maddaloni – 22 May 44 > 2 Aug 44

During the 10 weeks of operation the 27th Evac Hosp functioned at Maddaloni, Italy, 2,619 patients were admitted of whom all but 208 were surgical cases.

As the British desired the hospital area for a bivouac, the Hospital was ordered to close and evacuated its last patients on August 2. Because the organization was to return to Seventh US Army control for a mission in a different Theater, all equipment was to be packed and stored in preparation for an amphibious move. August 3, the entire command was transferred to a most delightful Staging Area at Pomigliano, Italy, where everyone was quartered in buildings. While some Officers and Nurses were on TD to the 52d Station Hospital (arrived in North Africa 26 Dec 42, established in Naples 17 Jan 44 –ed) in Naples, the majority of the men and women were allowed to secure some much needed rest and recreation. The use of an excellent swimming pool was most welcome during the hot days. Sightseeing trips were arranged to Pompeii and Sorrento.
The three weeks spent at Pomigliano permitted both a rest and the opportunity to get all the equipment in good order and up T/E allowance for the next move. Through the efforts of Colonel Myron P. Rudolph, MC, Seventh US Army Surgeon, enough additional equipment was authorized and secured to make the Hospital functional and quite self-sufficient.

Southern France:

In the latter part of August orders were received to start loading the equipment on the organic vehicles and on those of 2 Quartermaster Corps Truck Companies. Landing was planned for D + 20. In the meantime, the Invasion had begun as planned on August 15, 1944, and because of the unexpected rapid advance, the organization was told to move in order to arrive on D + 15. In the end all personnel together with the equipment sailed with the convoy, except for the Nurses who were taken aboard the USAHS “Acadia” which was sailing at the same time. All embarked on their respective ships August 28, while the CO traveled to France by plane the following day to select a good hospital site and arrange for inland transportation of the command.

Picture illustrating the maxillo-facial clinic of the 27th Evacuation Hospital. This picture may have been taken during the unit’s first plant which opened at Bouc-Bel-Aire, Southern France, September 1, 1944.

Picture illustrating the maxillo-facial clinic of the 27th Evacuation Hospital. This picture may have been taken during the unit’s first plant which opened at Bouc-Bel-Aire, Southern France, September 1, 1944.

The 27th Evac operated at Bouc-bel-Aire (Estate of the Marquis de Albertas), France, some five miles south of Aix-en-Provence, from September 1 to September 20, 1944 (the reason for this was that the hospital equipment was not delivered until the early morning of September 1, while the organic vehicles and the remaining equipment were only received September 5 –ed). It was however the closest US Army Hospital to Marseille, where it operated a Prophylactic Station and provided Dispensary service and Station Hospital care to all US troops in the area. In addition to Army personnel, the unit treated 1,169 patients including Free French troops and civilians, and occasionally American and British sailors, both naval and merchant marine.
With the influx of patients, the Hospital soon filled to capacity as evacuation was slow. All patients were evacuated by aircraft to Italy (transportation carried out by the 802d and 807th MAETS –ed) but during the first 10 days of operation, ambulances carried the patients to an airfield nearly fifty miles away. To simplify transportation, a field, only two miles from the unit was then utilized and provided more satisfactory evacuation. Property exchange became a problem, as the aircraft returned no pajamas, clothing, blankets, or litters for exchange and supplies became rapidly depleted.

Stations in France – 27th Evacuation Hospital
Bouc-bel-Aire – 1 Sep 44 > 20 Sep 44
Xertigny – 30 Sep 44 > 24 Nov 44
Baccarat – 25 Nov 44 > 17 Dec 44
Haguenau – 21 Dec 44 > 26 Dec 44
Baccarat – 30 Dec 44 > 18 Mar 45

Seventh Army was moving north very rapidly and were leaving many of the hospitals far behind. When the 36th General Hospital (arrived in North Africa 4 Sep 43, landed in Southern France 9 Sep 44 –ed) arrived to operate in Aix-en-Provence, where it was to open September 17, the 27th was relieved and instructed to rejoin the combat troops. A total of 1,169 patients had been admitted and the last remaining cases were transferred to the 36th General September 20.
On September 22, 1944, all unit vehicles loaded with housekeeping equipment including an advance party consisting of 2 Officers and 37 EM started a long drive north to an unknown destination. On their way they discovered the ruins of a destroyed German convoy that had been caught near Montélimar. For many miles the road was lined with ruined vehicles and mobile guns of all types. Whenever the convoy stopped, smiling Frenchmen approached with offerings of grapes and wine. The vehicles reached Seventh US Army Headquarters on the third day of travel and were taken to a wide field in the western outskirts of a town called Xertigny. This was to become the next hospital site (it was located some ten miles southwest of Epinal –ed).

Aerial view of the hospital plant at Bouc-Bel-Aire, Southern France, some five miles south of Aix-en-Provence.

Aerial view of the hospital plant at Bouc-Bel-Aire, Southern France, some five miles south of Aix-en-Provence.

The 27th arrived at its next site, near Xertigny, September 24, but was not in full operation before the end of the month. All but the advance detachment of the Hospital made the 450-mile trek from Bouc-bel-Aire by rail.
During the last two weeks of September 1944, continuous rain and cold hampered hospital movements and made operation a constant struggle against the elements. Tents had to be ditched, access roads graveled, and tent pegs regularly reset in the soft and muddy ground. Heating facilities were often inadequate, adding to the patients’ discomfort. A temporary camp was first established on an adjacent field and every precaution taken to preserve the sod on the new site. As rain had been falling for weeks it had softened the ground to such a degree that trucks could not be allowed in the area, so all equipment was carried from the road by hand. The remainder of the equipment was loaded on to freight cars at Gardanne and brought north September 24 while the personnel boarded Hospital Train No. 42 at Marseille the following day, traveling as far as Mouchard, two days later. The remaining over 100 miles went by truck. On the night of September 29, the trainload reached Mouchard where it was immediately transferred to trucks which shuttled back and forth for the next twenty-four hours via an excellent service road constructed by the 36th Engineer Combat Regiment (arrived in Southern France from Italy 15 Aug 44 –ed).

Operating room in action at Baccarat, France, where the 27th Evacuation Hospital. The organization occupied the Caserne Ladmirault where they remained from November 25 to December 17, 1944. Courtesy UIC.

Operating room in action at Baccarat, France, where the 27th Evacuation Hospital was established. The organization occupied the Caserne Ladmirault where they remained from November 25 to December 17, 1944. Courtesy UIC

The two whole months spent at Xertigny were extremely busy ones and produced severe and heavy casualties, who were not only suffering from battle wounds and injuries, but also from exhaustion and exposure (trench foot made its appearance). Although the Hospital was operating on a 900-bed basis the wards were filled most of the time and OR were never inactive. The 27th Evac was averaging a 1,000 admissions per week and on November 17, 1944 received its 10,000 overseas patient! Slowly, but steadily, American forces advanced gradually further north and east and ambulance hauls to Xertigny became too long for efficient medical care and a new hospital site was assigned this Hospital. It was to become the Caserne Ladmirault, formerly operated by the Garde Républicaine Mobile, at Baccarat. The buildings, a former caserne, originally built for French armored units, had been converted into a hospital by the Germans during the occupation and eventually used to garrison troops when it was attacked and badly damaged by the 2d French Armored Division. The buildings had been occupied by various French and American units who added considerably to the destruction. However, there was no choice as no other buildings were available and immediate movement was necessary. Therefore, on November 24, an advance party took over the remaining patients from the 57th Field Hospital and with assistance from a Platoon of the 343d Engineer General Service Regiment (arrived in Southern France 15 Aug 44 –ed) and a group of French civilians began a huge cleanup and reconstruction program. It became a monumental task as the organization’s tented hospital still had a census of 700 patients and few of the command personnel could be spared to work in the new area. Although the buildings were only ten years old, they did not have central heating; fortunately there was running water, lighting, and protection from the elements. Even only partially ready, the installation received over 2,000 patients in only three weeks keeping all departments quite busy.

Setup of Fixed Army Hospitals in Southern France
2000-bed 36th General Hospital (arrived 9 Sep 44) (opened 17 Sep 44 Aix-en-Provence)
500-bed 78th Station Hospital (arrived 13 Sep 44) (opened 19 Sep 44 Saint-Raphaël)
1500-bed 46th General Hospital (arrived 8 Sep 44) (opened 20 Sep 44 Besançon)
1500-bed 43d General Hospital (arrived 19 Sep 44) (opened 25 Sep 44 Aix-en-Provence)
500-bed 80th Station Hospital (arrived 14 Sep 44) (opened 30 Sep 44 Marseille)
1500-bed 3d General Hospital (arrived 29 Sep 44) (opened 9 Oct 44 Aix-en-Provence)
500-bed 35th Station Hospital (arrived 20 Sep 44) (opened 14 Oct 44 Chalon-sur-Saône)
250-bed 180th Station Hospital (arrived 13 Sep 44) (opened 20 Oct 44 Dijon)
2000-bed 21st General Hospital (arrived 4 Oct 44) (opened 21 Oct 44 Mirecourt)
500-bed 70th Station Hospital (arrived 18 Oct 44) (opened 1 Nov 44 Marseille)
500-bed 51st Station Hospital (arrived 11 Oct 44) (opened 4 Nov 44 Auxonne)
2000-bed 23d General Hospital (arrived 18 Oct 44) (opened 5 Nov 44 Vittel)
500-bed 23d Station Hospital (arrived 19 Sep 44) (opened 10 Nov 44 Epinal)
500-bed 69th Station Hospital (arrived 18 Nov 44) (opened 8 Dec 44 Marseille)

Classroom converted into an 8-table operating room, at Fénétrange, France. The 27th Evacuation Hospital was housed in an abandoned Roman Catholic School where they operated from March 19 until March 24, 1945. Courtesy UIC.

Classroom converted into an 8-table operating room, at Fénétrange, France. The 27th Evacuation Hospital was housed in an abandoned Roman Catholic School where they operated from March 19 until March 24, 1945. Courtesy UIC

The necessities of war however brought the need for another move, and exploration of the town of Haguenau produced a potential site in the form of an abandoned Artillery building complex which offered the best possibilities although much reconstruction and repair was necessary. Plans were laid for the hospital installation and work was started by the 40th Engineer Combat Regiment (arrived in Southern France 15 Aug 44 –ed). Booby traps and live ammo were destroyed, windows boarded, and filth and rubble removed. The enemy had left in a hurry leaving behind large stores of food and supplies. After enough space had been made available and tenable to accommodate the Hospital personnel, they were moved up from Baccarat, starting December 21. By Christmas Eve, ample space was available to run a 900-bed hospital plant with comfortable quarters, good mess facilities, enough wards and medical facilities, so that Christmas could be celebrated in style, with pine tree and decorations, a superb turkey dinner and appropriate services in the two chapels.

The year was not over, and at 2200, December 27, 1944, new orders were received to be ready to evacuate the Hospital the next day (the town was not safe and subjected to regular enemy artillery fire –ed). All patients were evacuated December 29 and by mid-afternoon the entire Hospital and its equipment were on their way back to Baccarat. Upon entering the former installation, so recently left behind, the men found all water pipes frozen solid and burst, much of the furniture removed, the electric wiring partially destroyed, and the buildings considerably damaged. Much had been looted by the local inhabitants. Everything was duly restored and the 27th was soon ready to celebrate what they all hoped would be their last New Year spent overseas … after a few days spent at Haguenau, the organization was back in Baccarat and by January 1, 1945, it was ready to receive more patients. Very few patients were admitted before January 4. On that day many ambulances arrived bringing in a continuous flow of wounded, with a census that reached its peak on February 1, with 1,125 patients. This high census caused long working hours, with the Medical / Surgical Officers and Nurses working 12-hour shifts.

Total admissions to the 27th Evacuation Hospital overseas during the last seven months of 1944, numbered 13,691. Of these 5,506 were classified as disease.

 1944 statistics illustrating the number of patients admitted at the various locations occupied by the 27th Evacuations Hospital during their stay overseas.

1944 statistics illustrating the number of patients admitted at the various locations occupied by the 27th Evacuations Hospital during their stay overseas.

1945
The 27th Evac opened the new year set up in the Caserne Ladmirault, in Baccarat, France. The tactical situation had necessitated a hasty withdrawal from Haguenau. Seventh US Army was now supported on its northern flank by the 51st Evacuation Hospital (landed in Southern France 25 Aug 44 –ed) at Saint-Dié; the 9th Evacuation Hospital (landed in Southern France 25 Aug 44 –ed) set up at Rambervillers; and the 27th Evacuation Hospital (landed in Southern France 30 Aug 44 –ed) established at Baccarat, all designated to handle and treat casualties from the fighting in the Colmar Pocket.
The fighting was bitter, and combined with the cold and the snow, the hospital census rose so rapidly that it was necessary to increase the plant capacity to 1125 beds. For the period January 8 to February 8, 1945, the average daily census was 1,015 patients. With a number of its own personnel sick in General Hospitals, it became urgent to secure help. Since the 59th Evacuation Hospital (landed in Southern France 25 Aug 44 –ed) was not operational at this time, it placed 6 Officers, 10 Nurses, and 22 Enlisted Men on TD with the 27th.

During January – February quite a number of Officers from higher Headquarters visited the Hospital. Also the ANC Officers were surprised with the visit of Colonel Florence A. Blanchfield, Superintendent Army Nurse Corps, Lt. Colonel Ida W. Danielson, ANC Director, ETOUSA, and Major Edith Frew, Chief Nurse, Seventh United States Army, who took time to discuss many problems of interest to the command nursing staff. Lieutenant General Alexander M. Patch, CG, Seventh United States Army; Major General Albert W. Kenner, SHAEF Surgeon, and Colonel Oscar S. Reeder, Six Army Group Surgeon, all visited and inspected the 27th Evac Hosp.
The ANC contingent of the 64th Field Hospital staged with the 27th for a few weeks while waiting for a new assignment.
With the fighting for the Colmar Pocket over, the unit was again called upon to assist hospitals less fortunate in the qualifications of their personnel. Captain Betty Hull, ANC, N-731617, one of the Assistant Chief Nurses, was reassigned as Chief Nurse to the 103d Evacuation Hospital, and Captain Edward L. Schrey, MC, O-489740, became Orthopedic Surgeon to the 238th General Hospital. First Lieutenant Helen E. Crosby, ANC, N-752612, was transferred to the 112th Evacuation Hospital to become the Chief Nurse for the Operating Rooms. The organization also lost Captain Edward T. Abrahms, MC, O-491046, who returned to the United States. Four (4) Nurses were transferred for eight days to the 10th Field Hospital. The Hospital remained at Baccarat until March 18. During this period, fighting on the First and Ninth US Army fronts was severe, while Seventh US Army was less active. The resulting lower patient census gave everyone a chance for some rest, and the few recreational facilities were enlarged to include daily movies for the EM and more activities for the Officers’ club. Colonel Lee D. Cady, CO, 21st General Hospital Invited 2 groups of Officers to participate in wild boar hunts conducted with the help of French forest rangers.

Colonel Charles B. Puestow, Commanding Officer, 27th Evacuation Hospital conducting an operation. It looks like the OR is set up in a tent, but the site is unfortunately not identified. Courtesy UIC.

Colonel Charles B. Puestow, Commanding Officer, 27th Evacuation Hospital conducting an operation. It looks like the OR is set up in a tent, but the site is unfortunately not identified. Courtesy UIC

Seventh United States Army then started to push forward in order to crack the defenses of the Siegfried Line. On March 18, 1945, the Hospital received orders to move to Fénétrange and set up in a large Roman Catholic School, originally built and run by Nuns, but eventually used by the Germans as Hitlerjugend school. The stay was short as the frontline had moved so far forward, that further movement was inevitable. Fortunately admissions were light, with an average census of 400 patients. The school buildings would not adequately house 750 patients but the unit was able to set up 500 beds and had plans for a possible expansion in tents, if necessary. The Hospital only remained approximately one week at Fénétrange. Some changes in personnel occurred including transfers to other units and arrival of replacements to compensate losses.

Stations in France – 27th Evacuation Hospital
Baccarat – 30 Dec 44 > 18 Mar 45
Fénétrange – 19 Mar 45 > 24 Mar 45

Germany:

March 25, 1945, the 27th moved northeast toward the River Rhine and set foot in Germany for the first time. The new destination was Dreisen, some twenty miles west of Worms, Germany, where a very adaptable area was available for a small tented hospital city. Here were other medical units, such as the 56th Medical Battalion, the 27th 112th 127th Evacuation Hospitals, and the 57th Field Hospital, acting as an Air Holding Hospital. Also the 11th and the 95th Evacuation Hospitals were on site to stage awaiting their dash across the Rhine. It was at Dreisen that the Hospital received its first 4 liberated Allied PWs, Soviet military personnel who in addition to their multiple diseases were undernourished.

The Commanding Officer, 21st General Hospital, Colonel Lee D. Cady invited Colonel Charles B. Puestow, CO, 27th Evacuation Hospital, with some of his Officers to participate in a wild boar hunt conducted with the help of local forest rangers. The action took place March 8, 1945, in the region around Mirecourt, France, where the 21st General Hospital was established.

The Commanding Officer, 21st General Hospital, Colonel Lee D. Cady invited Colonel Charles B. Puestow, CO, 27th Evacuation Hospital, with some of his Officers to participate in a wild boar hunt conducted with the help of local forest rangers. The action took place March 8, 1945, in the region around Mirecourt, France, where the 21st General Hospital was established.

With so many hospitals moving such a long distance at the same time, transportation was critical and the organization could secure enough trucks to move only a small part of its equipment each day. After more Infantry Divisions crossed the Rhine, casualties started to come in rapidly, and in less than eight hours (March 26, 1945), the Hospital received nearly 300 patients taxing the medical facilities and the manpower to the utmost. On March 30, nearly 290 American PWs, recently liberated from a German Military Hospital at Heppenheim, were brought into the Air Holding Hospital Center and placed in the care of the 57th Field Hospital, awaiting air evacuation to France. They were a pathetic group of starved individuals, extremely emaciated, many suffering with TBC. April 3, 1945, 40 C-47 cargo planes dropped onto the field adjacent to the Hospitals and lined up ready to evacuate more than 600 RAMP patients to France.
Air evacuation was to play an important role during the Allied offensive. During the approach to the River Rhine, an ALG was set up at Göllheim (Y-66, opened 25 Mar 45 –ed); after the crossing another opened near Darmstadt (Y-76 at Darmstadt/Griesheim, opened 31 Mar 45 –ed), where Seventh Army air evac thenceforth originated.

The 27th Evac crossed the River Rhine on a pontoon bridge April 3, and proceeded by motor convoy to Darmstadt with instructions to find a location east of Aschaffenburg, but as it soon learned that fighting was still going on in the area; it spent the night at the 93d Evacuation Hospital enjoying the hospitality offered by the Commanding Officer, Colonel Donald E. Currier. Aschaffenburg was nothing but destruction and with difficulty the Hospital found the road leading east. However, after passing through Hosbach it was concluded that the mountainous terrain ahead would be unsatisfactory for a hospital site, therefore, after exploring the neighborhood, the men found fields at a crossroads adjacent to a stream which would serve their purpose. The first convoy of trucks arrived a few hours later, this was around 1430 hours, April 5, 1945, and the installation was quickly erected; in just two hours, the Receiving, Shock, Pre-Op Section, X-Ray, and Surgery Department were ready to function. The nearby stream provided water for the shower tent, kitchen, and medical tents. Soon the combat troops and frontline left the 27th behind. During the Hosbach setup, the Hospital received a first batch of 74 RAMPs, including American, British, French, New Zealanders, Yuogoslavs, and Serbians from the liberated Stalag XIII, at Hammelberg, Germany. Later, over 150 RAMPs were admitted in just a few days time. All released PWs told similar stories of bad treatment, poor food, lack of medical care, and wanton cruelty. Also liberated prisoners of other Allied nations came in for treatment, with some of them having been in German Oflags and Stalags for many years. They were most happy and gratified to be received at an American hospital.

Aerial view of the 27th Evacuation Hospital installations at Starnberg, Germany, where the hospital operated from May 8 until June 10, 1945. Courtesy UIC

Aerial view of the 27th Evacuation Hospital installations at Starnberg, Germany, where the hospital operated from May 8 until June 10, 1945. Courtesy UIC

In line with Seventh United States Army advance toward the River Danube and Munich, Germany, the 27th was ordered to start packing once more and by April 22 was soon on its way to an area near Feuchtwangen. The advance party found a large meadow located on a good but little used road. Professional services were installed on one side of the road while the administration, mess, and supply departments were set up on the other side. April 24, 1945, the first 37 patients were admitted. The setting proved very satisfactory. Casualties remained fairly light and remaining so far behind the combat troops, admissions were not numerous at all. The Hospital census did never go beyond 357 patients at this particular location, and only occasional RAMPs were received. The weather remained cold and dreary but the command managed to find some diversion in the surrounding area.
On May 5, 1945, Colonel Myron P. Rudolph attended a unit formation during which Hospital members were presented with the Bronze Star Medal.

  • Colonel Charles B. Puestow, MC, O-267687
  • Colonel Howard I. Down, MC, O-486274
  • Colonel William J. Gillesby, MC, O-483216
  • Captain Noel J. Hershey, MC, 337347
  • Captain Rhoda E. Frid, ANC, N-744164
  • Captain Caroline Stewart, ANC, N-731628
  • 1st Lieutenant Jean L. Fleming, HD, R-846
  • 1st Lieutenant Kathleen I. McPoland, ANC, N-731620
  • Master Sergeant Robert E. Olson, 37452456
  • Staff Sergeant Theron G. Holbrook, 14139120
  • Staff Sergeant Charles J. Mohler, 37501079
  • Staff Sergeant Griffen M. Smith, 17076852
  • Staff Sergeant Samuel J. Woody, 34372858
  • Sergeant Joseph A. Bartels, 16098098
  • Technician 4th Grade James M. Chinn, 36316714
  • Technician 4th Grade Donald L. Hartrich, 16125771
  • Private First Class Richard V. Lyman, 37332580
  • Private First Class Thomas L. Taylor, 35442656

A total of 5,387 Purple Hearts were awarded to patients under treatment at the 27th Evacuation Hospital.

1944 statistics ilustrating the mortality rate vs. the number of total admissions at the various sites occupied by the 27th Evacuation Hospital.

1944 statistics ilustrating the mortality rate vs. the number of total admissions at the various sites occupied by the 27th Evacuation Hospital.

With the coming of May 1945, the end of the war in Europe was in sight. Munich fell almost without fighting, German troops in Austria surrendered, further enemy resistance in Northern Italy ended, and the Allied Armies started cleaning up the remaining enemy pockets. Starting May 5, an advance party located an excellent field on the outskirts of Starnberg, Germany at the northern end of the Würmsee (lake some 16 miles southwest of Munich –ed). Movement took place by ambulance (carrying the Nurses), by amphibians (DUKWs, carrying the equipment), and by trucks (transporting the personnel and the equipment). On their return trip the following day, it stopped to visit KZ-Dachau which had recently been liberated. The men were appalled at what they saw; history cannot equal the suffering, torture, and degradation inflicted by the Nazi regime in such death camps.

May 7, 1945, the motor convoy began the long trip to Starnberg. After crossing the Danube and miles of rough road it was a relief to drive on the main Autobahn toward Munich. In the latter days of the war it was even used as an airstrip, with aircraft lining the road and some camouflaged hangars.
The 27th Evacuation Hospital was installed on both sides of a road leading to a beautiful horse breeding farm with some 60 horses grazing in neighboring fields. The mission was to service troops in the surrounding area, whereby the organization operated as a kind of Station Hospital. It was not a very busy period, with a patient census rarely exceeding 200. Three (3) groups of ANC Officers each spent a week on Temporary Duty at Dachau Concentration Camp, being temporarily attached to the 127th Evacuation Hospital. It must be stated that the unit’s five weeks of duty in Southern Bavaria were perhaps the most pleasant ones since operating overseas. With the ongoing reorganization of the different occupation zones and US Armies’ operational delimitations, it was necessary for the 27th to leave its beautiful location and move to Darmstadt. Because of the devastating air raids there were few buildings to occupy in the city, and it was opted to set up a tented hospital in the City Park, which with its trees offered a very satisfactory location for the Hospital proper. Nearby apartments provided very comfortable living quarters for the Officers and Nurses. With a census averaging slightly more than a 100 patients, there was some ample free time for everyone. The daily average patient census was 125.

Stations in Germany – 27th Evacuation Hospital
Dreisen – 26 Mar 45 > 4 Apr 45
Hosbach – 5 Apr 45 > 23 Apr 45
Feuchtwangen – 24 Apr 45 > 7 May 45
Starnberg – 8 May 45 > 10 Jun 45
Darmstadt – 12 Jun 45 > 30 Jun 45

Picture illustrating part of the maxillo-facial clinic (background) and the dental clinic (foreground). The location, a tented hospital, could be Bouc-Bel-Aire, in Southern France.

Picture illustrating part of the maxillo-facial clinic (background) and the dental clinic (foreground). The location, a tented hospital, could be Bouc-Bel-Aire, in Southern France.

The End:

Orders classifying the 27th Evac as a Category IV unit (to be returned to the ZI for inactivation and discharge –ed) brought the prospect of inactivation. Transfer of the first group of personnel of the command caused a great deal of unhappiness. When the Category was modified and the Headquarters were informed that the organization would remain largely intact the rejoicing was overwhelming. After 18 long months in the Zone of Interior awaiting active service, the Hospital was fortunate being able to serve close to combat almost constantly in Italy, France, and Germany.
Over 10,000 patients were admitted during the period January to June 1945, of whom more than 3,500 required surgical care. The mortality rate among all admissions was 0.54%, and among American troops this only reached 0.29%. Considering the high incidence and severity of battle wounds and injuries the record remains impressive.

November 28, 1945, the organization finally shipped back to the Zone of Interior, where the Hospital was inactivated December 10, 1945.

Group of Nurses and patients at Maddaloni, Italy. The 27th Evacuation Hospital operated a tented hospital where they mainly treated French and French colonial troops, between late May and early August 1944.

Group of Nurses and patients at Maddaloni, Italy. The 27th Evacuation Hospital operated a tented hospital where they mainly treated French and French colonial troops, between late May and early August 1944.

Personnel Roster (as per January 1, 1945)

Officers:

Puestow, Charles B., Colonel, MC, O-267687, Commanding Officer
Down, Howard I., Lt. Colonel, MC, O-486274, Chief Surgical Service
Gillesby, William J., Lt. Colonel, MC, O-483216, Chief Ward Section
Jacques, William A., Lt. Colonel, MC, O-473015, Executive Officer
Redlich, William E. Lt. Colonel, MC, O-496499, Chief Dental Service

Bedard, Robert E., Major, MC, O-489572, General Surgeon
Breslow, Lawrence, Major, MC, O-489573, Medical Officer Communicable Disease
Byfield, George V., Major, MC, O-483088, Internist
Campana, Frederick T., Major, MC, O-314850, Internist
Carter, Clifford L., Major, MC, O-325393, General Surgeon
Goodwine, Gleyn, Major, MAC, O-490498, Registrar
Hoffman, Carl D., Major, MC, O-274722, General Surgeon
Lewis, James W., Major, MC, O-344247, Chief X-Ray Service
Lundgren, Edward S., Major, MC, O-486294, General Surgeon
Mathis, John H., Major, MC, O-329890, Urologist
Spelman, Arch E., Major, MC, O-491046, General Surgeon
Weaver, Thomas A., Jr., Major, MC, O-483124, Neuro-Surgeon

Picture illustrating the Commanding Officer of the 27th Evacuation Hospital in his quarters. Colonel Charles B. Puestow, MC, O-267687, would command the unit from January 1, 1943 to its inactivation December 10, 1945 (with a small interruption). Courtesy UIC

Picture illustrating the Commanding Officer of the 27th Evacuation Hospital in his quarters. Colonel Charles B. Puestow, MC, O-267687, would command the unit from January 1, 1943 to its inactivation December 10, 1945 (with a small interruption). Courtesy UIC

Abrahms, Edward T., Captain, MC, O-501750, Otorhinolaryngologist
Allison, Charles, Captain, MC, O-1821149, General Surgeon
Arthur, Lawrence M., Captain, MC, O-529041, Urologist
Blatchley, Robert P., Captain, DC, O-485876, General Dentist
Bone, Jams H., Captain, MAC, O-498668, Information & Education Officer, Mess Officer
Bowers, Daniel E., Captain, MC, O-486292, General Surgeon
Brosnam, John J., Captain, MC, O-494067, General Surgeon
Buckley, Joseph H., Captain, MC, O-486263, General Surgeon
Cross, James H., Captain, MC, O-486268, General Surgeon
Cross, Roland R., Jr., Captain, MC, O-493192, General Medicine
Donahoe, Robert F., Captain, ChC, O-406371, Catholic Chaplain
Ennis, Arthur L., Captain, MC, O-466546, General Surgeon
Fildes, Charles E., Captain, MC, O-485621, Anaesthetist
Frishman, Andrew J., Captain, MC, O-447793, General Surgeon
Grimm, Harold A., Captain, MC, O-483265, Chief Laboratory Service
Grundset, Kenneth W., Captain, DC, O-1821098, General Dentist
Hershey, Nol J., Captain, MC, O-337347, General Medicine
Howell, Kenneth L., Captain, MAC, O-490497, Medical Supply Officer
Joffe, Herman, Captain, MC, O-373532, Orthopedic Surgeon
Kemp, Karlten H., Captain, MC, O-494150, General Surgeon
Klein, John P., Captain, MC, O-483220, General Surgeon
Kleitsch, William P., Captain, MC, O-583089, Plastic Surgeon
Lane, Sidney, Captain, MC, O-486296, General Surgeon
Levin, Leon, Captain, MC, O-478693, General Dentist
Mehl, Lambert J., Captain, ChC, O-360163, Protestant Chaplain
Merrim, Bentley D., Captain, MC, O-484780, General Medicine
Montagnino, Ignatius J., Captain, MC, O-1690557, General Medicine
Schrey, Edward L., Captain, MC, O-489740, Orthopedic Surgeon
Simmons, William G., Captain, MAC, O-503790, Detachment Commanding Officer
Truemmer, Keith M., Captain, MC, O-522050, General Medicine
Van Sicklin, Roy, Captain, MC, O-494065, Roentgenologist
Webb, Edward F., Captain, MC, O-486273, Otorhinolaryngologist
Weidman, Abraham, Captain, MC, O-488839, General Medicine
Whalen, Charles H., Captain, MC, O-447623, General Medicine

Dickie, James W., 1st Lieutenant, MC, O-472069, General Medicine
Kasparovitch, Eugene, 1st Lieutenant, TD, O-1823166, Athletic & Recreation Officer
Sturgeon, Clayton P., 1st Lieutenant, MAC, O-1692587, Adjutant

Meyers, Milton W., 2d Lieutenant, MAC, O-2082268, Athletic & Recreation Officer
Taylor, Kenneth F., 2d Lieutenant, MAC, O-2163315, Information & Education Officer

Wright, Alfred L., Chief Warrant Officer, W-2124492, AUS, Assistant Registrar

Nurses:

Frid, Rhoda B., Captain, ANC, N-744164, Principal Chief Nurse
Hull, Betty, Captain, ANC, N-731617, Assistant Chief Nurse
Stewart, Caroline, Captain, ANC, N-731628, Assistant Chief Nurse

Picture of 1st Lieutenant Vera C. Gustafson, ANC, N-744548, General Duty Nurse with some patients, while the 27th Evacuation Hospital was operating at Maddaloni, Italy.

Picture of 1st Lieutenant Vera C. Gustafson, ANC, N-744548, General Duty Nurse with some patients, while the 27th Evacuation Hospital was operating at Maddaloni, Italy.

Abildtrup, Margaret, 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731610, Nurse
Holmdal, Irma J., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-732008, Nurse
Augunas, Sophie A., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-721192, Nurse
Hufty, Annabelle, 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731631, Nurse
Backman, Winifred H., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-743401, Nurse
Johnson, Anna M., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731618, Nurse
Basinger, Patricia, 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731611, Nurse
Kartrude, Gertrude M., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-733221, Nurse
Bishop, Chalotte T., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-757762, Nurse
Kellhofer, Duena R., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-745117, Nurse
Boyce, Catherine H., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-783636, Nurse
Leech, Mary L., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-721363, Nurse
Brown, Vera M., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-733891, Nurse
Lorenz, Mary K., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-745118, Nurse
Burke, Ursula M., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731675, Nurse
Lundahl, Helen M., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-745095, Nurse
Burton, Eleanor I., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-744545, Nurse
McKercher, Arlene F., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-744559, Nurse
Carlson, Mildred S., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-744556, Nurse
McPoland, Kathleen I., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731620, Nurse
Clarke, Helen K., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-784906, Nurse
Marquardt, Evelyn M., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-741901, Nurse
Clyde, Gelia C., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-744547, Nurse
Massie, Mary M., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-745096, Nurse
Colbert, Ann A., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731612, Nurse
Munson, Ruth E., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-745097, Nurse
Copello, Florence H., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-722683, Nurse
Myren, Marjorie E., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731621, Nurse
Cramblit, Ruth E., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-742892, Nurse
Petty, Edith L., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731622, Nurse
Crosby, Helen E., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-752612, Nurse
Schlecht, Clara E., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-744561, Nurse
Dwire, Eileen F., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-752650, Nurse
Schlecht, Helen S., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731625, Nurse
Ege, Bernice S., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731613, Nurse
Schroeder, Ruth H., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-744562, Nurse
Fallon, Mary E., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-720674, Nurse
Scott, Margaret E., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731626, Nurse
Farnum, Lois E., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731614, Nurse
Shivick, Statia T., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-787462, Nurse
Forte, Elsie, 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-752605, Nurse
Taylor, Ann W., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-772475, Nurse
Frayne, Annie D., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-772625, Nurse
Thompson, Alice R., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731629, Nurse
Garvey, Agnes L., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-752606, Nurse
Tucker, Katherine L., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731630, Nurse
Greenman, Claire J., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731406, Nurse
Weber, Barbara J., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731627, Nurse
Gustafson, Vera C., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-744548, Nurse
Woudema, Anne, 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-742894, Nurse
Haapala, Taimi S., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-731615, Nurse
Young, Ruth, 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-745100, Nurse
Harbin, Kathryn R., 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-742232, Nurse
Zagajeski, Lillian, 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-722063, Nurse
Harshfield, Dorothy, 1st Lieutenant, ANC, N-745092, Nurse
 
Fleming, Jean L., 1st Lieutenant, HD, R-846, Dietitian
Alysan Hooper, Field Director, ARC
Picture illustrating a number of patients after triage, enjoying some rest while awaiting further treatment. Picture taken either at Maddaloni, Italy, or at Bouc-Bel-Aire, Southern France.

Picture illustrating a number of patients after triage, enjoying some rest while awaiting further treatment. Picture taken either at Maddaloni, Italy, or at Bouc-Bel-Aire, Southern France.

Enlisted Men:

Aglione, Lichael J., Technician 4th Grade, 12090255
Johnson, David T., Private First Class, 34258531
Agranoff, Jerome, Private First Class, 32897541
Johnson, Royal, Technician 4th Grade, 34258299
Alford, Donnie D., Technician 4th Grade, 34258253
Johnston, William F., Private First Class, 31391649
Allison, Bobby D., Technician 4th Grade, 35365467
Kaplan, Elwood I., Private First Class, 15308332
Amorosi, Joseph L., Technician 5th Grade, 32503197
Kasiner, WXilliam R., Staff Sergeant, 38021191
Anderson, Carrol D., Private First Class, 37438518
Keltner, Henry E., Private First Class, 6298278
Anderson, Wilbur N., Corporal, 37452824
Kendle, Lawrence D., Private First Class, 35172475
Antonacci, Patsy, Technician 5th Grade, 36071650
Kerr, Everett C., Technician 4th Grade, 34370205
Apple, Joseph Jr., Private First Class, 37037115
Kindred, John Jr., Private First Class, 35122402
Atamian, Sarkis, Private First Class, 31384261
Kleitsch, Alvin E., Technician 4th Grade, 16101017
Avakian, Kermit A., Private First Class, 34370301
Klepper, John F., Technician 4th Grade, 17076850
Babcock, Wayne G., Private First Class, 37216467
Koziol, Teophil R., Private First Class, 37452865
Ballard, Sam W., Technician 4th Grade, 35467822
Krupa, Daniel M., Technician 5th Grade, 16101235
Bareham, Ronald A., Staff Sergeant, 32424535
Kuehn, Helmut A., Corporal, 36601506
Barnes, Clinton G. Technician 5th Grade, 16074929
LaFevers, Ancil T., Technician 3d Grade, 16101400
Barreca, Joseph S., Technician 5th Grade, 32382184
Lamb, Palmer R., Corporal, 34451345
Bartels, Joseph A., Sergeant, 16098098
Leaman, Harold E., Technician 3d Grade, 35413493
Baumann, Charles, Private First Class, 32559823
Lee, Thomas J., Technician 4th Grade, 34441107
Beagle, Emery D., Technician 5th Grade, 35366377
Lentz, Leonard E., Corporal, 36176074
Becker, Harold L., Technician 5th Grade, 37425872
Lewis, Charles T., Corporal, 17076832
Begley, Kevin P., Private First Class, 31354122
Lewis, Leonard L., Private First Class, 32897464
Bell, Donald, Technician 5th Grade, 36205467
Lingle, Tommy A., Private First Class, 34891123
Bellemore, John J., Private, 36176057
Lipsey, William T., Jr., Technician 4th Grade, 34392447
Berry, Maldon D., Corporal, 34369766
Long, Barry Y., Private First Class, 31270186
Berryhill, Willis M., Private First Class, 34890375
Long, Robert M., Jr., Private First Class, 34450089
Besthorn, William G., Jr., Corporal, 37216286
Lott, Grant, Private First Class, 34441071
Bock, Gregory F., Private First Class, 36604370
Lowry, Henry, Private, 34258306
Booth, Carlson F., Technician 3d Grade, 13063520
Luiz, Gabriel A., Private First Class, 31209021
Breuklander, Wilbur R., Technician 5th Grade, 37421463
Lyman, Richard V., Private First Class, 37332580
Brice, William E., Technician 5th Grade, 36326581
Manning, Bernice G., Technician 5th Grade, 34319830
Britt, Eugene R., Private First Class, 34392477
Marlowe, Marsh, Technician 5th Grade, 34258479
Brown, Joseph D., Technician 5th Grade, 36071807
Marsh, Lowell D., Technician 5th Grade, 37425842
Bullins, William O., Technician 5th Grade, 34451275
Martinez, Bruno G., Private First Class, 38123699
Burdett, Arthur L., Technician 4th Grade, 37216221
Massey, Hoyte S., Private First Class, 34258480
Burkhead, Charles W., Technician 3d Grade, 35400972
Matthews, James A., Technician 4th Grade, 34430847
Burnham, Walter M., Private First Class, 32832727
McCann, Thomas, Corporal, 32501299
Buss, Robert L., Technician 4th Grade, 37428932
McDonald, Estell L., Private First Class, 34370002
Byrom, James B., Technician 4th Grade, 34441545
McKirgan, John L., Staff Sergeant, 16072837
Callaham, Brooke G., Technician 5th Grade, 34430863
McKissick, Richard C., Technician 4th Grade, 39912959
Campbell, Charlie B., Technician 5th Grade, 34430038
Meeks, James H., Private First Class, 39908288
Canelli, Frank, Private First Class, 31335251
Mello, John P., Private, 31384348
Capell, Robert B., Private First Class, 14150478
Metteer, Harold I., Private First Class, 37260253
Carr, Samuel H., Private First Class, 33604182
Meusburger, Fred, Private First Class, 37425925
Carver, Roy M., Technician 5th Grade, 37216225
Meyers, Milton W., Staff Sergeant, 16126020
Cash, Dayton L., Jr., Technician 4th Grade, 34257732
Miller, Paul C., Private First Class, 39542820
Casson, Richard E., Private First Class, 32837828
Miller, William H., Private First Class, 36642208
Castillo, Frank, Technician 5th Grade, 6958486
Mills, Robert R., Corporal, 35365199
Chan, Edward L., Private First Class, 12220001
Minassian, Shahab, Private First Class, 33796107
Chelf, James W., Corporal, 36640469
Mintz, Irving, Private First Class, 12114069
Chiazzese, Sam L., Private First Class, 32832873
Mobley, Leonard C., Private First Class, 34686245
Chinn, James M., Technician 4th Grade, 36316714
Mohler, Charles J., Staff Sergeant, 37501079
Chrisenberry, Samuel M., Technician 5th Grade, 34450014
Moomaw, Gilbert F., Technician 4th Grade, 33627803
Chrzanowski, Alexander J., Private First Class, 32837834
Morgan, Robert J., Private First Class, 35263710
Clement, Joseph P., Private, 31263629
Morris, Harris C., Corporal, 34441462
Closs, Douglas H., Corporal, 36734292
Morris, James H., Private First Class, 14139139
Cogburn, Earl J., Private First Class 38016687
Newsome, Allan G., Technician 5th Grade, 34430139
Coggin, Albert T., Technician 4th Grade, 34258816
Norling, Carl G., Technician 4th Grade, 31084849
Collins, George F., Private First Class, 32975808
Norman, Sam O., Jr., Private First Class, 34370123
Colosi, Mario J., Private First Class, 32832742
Odom, William T., Jr., Private First Class, 34450954
Constantine, Gus A., Private First Class, 36614181
Olson, Robert E., Master Sergeant, 37452456
Correll, Blaine S., Technician 5th Grade, 15305916
Orozco, Victoriano A., Private First Class, 392131560
Costa, George, Technician 5th Grade, 31230074
Padilla, Benjamin, Private First Class, 39279306
Cott, Amos, Private First Class, 37216262
Palmer, Walter O., Technician 4th Grade, 34370335
Courtney, Edward J., Technician 5th Grade, 32832634
Park, Gee, Private First Class, 34430150
Crabtree, Philip E., Technician 4th Grade, 34258656
Partridge, Frank G., Technician 5th Grade, 16101337
Crosnoe, Harry J., Technician 5th Grade, 36640436
Pate, Mack, Technician 5th Grade, 38231135
Curtis, John L., Private First Class, 36640445
Pate, Naff, Private First Class, 34430200
Czarny, Edward S., Technician 5th Grade, 32837808
Pate, Willis W., Private First Class, 34258652
Dalpe, Ernest O., Private First Class, 31353715
Paulson, Gaylon W., Technician 4th Grade, 37426009
D’Amico, Paul S., Private First Class, 31344282
Perdue, James E., Private First Class, 37216376
Day, Vennoy H., Technician 5th Grade, 34450092
Perry, Joseph Jr., Technician 5th Grade, 31203031
Deadwyler, John S., Technician 4th Grade, 34441586
Philpot, Kingsley D., Technician 4th Grade, 17088092
DeMao, James, Private First Class, 32832666
Pignone, Ralph A., Private First Class, 31347499
DeMarchi, Robert D., Private First Class, 31344240
Pope, Curtis L., Private First Class, 34441570
Demico, Anthony L., Technician 5th Grade, 32832709
Powanda, George, Private First Class, 33617807
Depenning, Clarence L., Private First Class, 37425858
Presnell, Luther M., Private First Class, 34430923
Deposki, Frank J., Technician 3d Grade, 37371834
Puntar, Angelo, Private First Class, 32686132
Devlin, Robert J., Jr., Private First Class, 32734913
Quick, Richard R., Technician 5th Grade, 35366306
Dickens, Raymond S., Private First Class, 34430919
Rabinowitz, Abe, Technician 5th Grade, 32729022
Dievendorf, Arnold F., Technician 5th Grade, 32847607
Raspa, Louis N., Private First Class, 32914327
Dobbs, Harold P., Sergeant, 34441421
Ratliff, Don L., Sergeant, 17076851
Dodek, Philip J., Technician 5th Grade, 33785225
Refice, Louie, Corporal, 36145098
Domke, Emil O., Technician 5th Grade, 36731137
Reich, Herman, Technician 4th Grade, 36326614
Douglas, Edward H., Private First Class, 34450793
Reznik, Valerian F., Technician 3d Grade, 36396461
Duff, Mike W., Technician 5th Grade, 15362865
Rice, Charlie H., Private First Class, 34319733
Dunlay, Vincent E., Private First Class, 37425901
Rigley, William H., Technical Sergeant, 16075027
Durden, Gaynor M., Technician 5th Grade, 34441048
Rivera, Rumaldo A., Technician 5th Grade, 37351478
Durham, James C., Private First Class, 34370387
Rogers, Bruce E., Technician 5th Grade, 34369404
Eagles, Harold F., Private First class, 34258387
Romero, Joe D., Private, 37351495
Eckhoff, Francis W., Private First Class, 37452653
Rosado, Benjamin D., Private First Class, 32792422
Edgar, Sam Y., Technician 5th Grade, 14163215
Rossignol, Joseph P., Private First Class, 31351156
Eisenstein, Walter M., Technical Sergeant, 16085581
Rowe, Gillious L., Private First Class, 34319706
Ellis, Arthur R., III, Private First Class, 32471677
Schmidt, Dwight A., Technician 5th Grade, 16112768
Ericson, Richard N., Technician 4th Grade, 16099279
Schrag, Orvid R., Technician 5th Grade, 39617374
Ernst, Howard L., Private First Class, 37425782
Schreyer, Fred C., Technician 4th Grade, 37423754
Esposito, Neal J., Private First Class, 31313648
Scotti, Salvatore, Private First Class, 31183114
Eustice, Walter E., Private, 33606827
Scruggs, William T., Technician 4th Grade, 34390627
Fabry, Alvin, Technician 4th Grade, 36233902
Sewell, Vance E., Private, 34201489
Flood, Theldon C., Technician 5th Grade, 34451369
Seymour, Albert P., Private, 34440737
Floyd, Grady C., Private First Class, 34319798
Sharp, William F., Corporal, 34390853
Floyd, William P., Technician 5th Grade, 34450131
Shepard, Irving M., Technician 5th Grade, 16126814
Fordham, Robert D., Jr., Private First Class, 34440938
Sherer, Earl J., Private, 31084864
Frank, Roy R., Sergeant, 36054719
Shimko, John M., Technician 5th Grade, 33294199
Frentzel, Theodore W., Corporal, 35665431
Shonbeck, Eric G., Technician 5th Grade, 31084790
Gann, Ralph E., Private, 34370088
Shulik, Saul M., Private First Class, 33802139
Garrett, Lee I., Corporal, 38464445
Skinner, Curtis A., Technician 5th Grade, 37425679
Gasbarre, Salvatore J., Private, 32832743
Slover, Edsel E., Private First Class, 34370654
Gay, Elbert N., Private First Class, 34369679
Smith, Fred, W., Technician 4th Grade, 34257810
Gelman, Jack E., Technician 3d Grade, 35318129
Smith, Griffn M., Staff Sergeant, 17076852
Goldfeller, Ben, Technician 3d Grade, 16126815
Smith, Robert C., Jr., Private First Class, 34390941
Goldman, Emmanuel R., Private First Class, 31136243
Smith, William R., Private First Class, 31207197
Golightly, Oscar R., Technician 5th Grade, 34430878
Spaggiari, James, Technician 5th Grade, 34475196
Goodwin, Ray C., Private First Class, 32134297
Specht, Owen D., Technician 4th Grade, 35366327
Gowans, Charles S., Corporal, 39904406
Spitz, Donald A., Technician 5th Grade, 37425917
Grabow, Clifford L., Private First Class, 37470967
Spivey, Charles B., Staff Sergeant, 34451296
Greenstein, Herbert E., Private First Class, 33778891
Sprinkle, John R., Sergeant, 34430354
Griffin, Lonnie E., Private First Class, 34451053
Stapleton, Clarence W., Technician 5th Grade, 34370376
Griffith, Dale D., Technician 4th Grade, 37332857
Stevens, John W., Technician 3d Grade, 16070021
Grissom, Quentin T., Staff Sergeant, 16074034
Stinchcombe, Robert H., Private First Class, 36423187
Gunn, Julius V., Private First Class, 39565081
Stokes, Homer A., Technician 5th Grade, 34440842
Gunning, Harry G., Technician 3d Grade, 36208150
Stough, Melvin A., Private First Class, 34804602
Hake, Dave, Private First Class, 39457400
Strutzenberg, Charles E., Private First Class, 37425914
Hall, Joseph R., Jr., Private First Class, 34326964
Taylor, Alfred F., Technician 4th Grade, 34430978
Hallyburton, Edward J., Technician 4th Grade, 34431037
Taylor, Eustice, Private First Class, 34258162
Hampton, William S., Technician 5th Grade, 16124118
Taylor, Kenneth F., Technical Sergeant, 39408371
Hand, George V., Private First Class, 14139117
Taylor, Thomas L., Private First Class, 35442656
Harbin, Leman, Private First Class, 14150463
Thomas, Linney D., Technician 5th Grade, 34451256
Harris, Paul E., Technician 3d Grade, 16101149
Thomson, Clarence L., Technician 5th Grade, 34369557
Hartrich, Donald L., Technician 4th Grade, 16125771
Tom, Irvin E., Technician 4th Grade, 37376117
Hathaway, Donald F., Private First Class, 39458415
Ulrich, Kermit N., Corporal, 35365117
Hauge, Jack L., First Sergeant, 17050839
Vandenberg, Frederick H., Private First Class, 36176013
Hays, John P., Private First Class, 34441466
Veldhuizen, Arnold G., Private First Class, 37425776
Heist, Edwin C., Technician 5th Grade, 33827345
Venable, Cleo M., Technician 4th Grade, 33430957
Hejda, Ladimer E., Technician 4th Grade, 35022262
Vollmer, Edwin, Technician 5th Grade, 16128634
Helms, George W., Staff Sergeant, 37351647
Wade, Odell W., Private, 34570801
Helms, James M., Private First Class, 34450655
Walls, William H., Technician 5th Grade, 34369560
Helton, John W., Jr., Technician 5th Grade, 34441121
Walker, Fred T., Private First Class, 34430036
Hensley, Oscar E., Technician 5th Grade, 34369993
Warnekros, Casper P., Technician 3d Grade, 20918326
Herring, Albert, Private First Class, 33177881
Watson, Perry L., Private, 34370030
Hester, Ralph E., Private First Class, 34390779
Watson, Shirley B., Technical Sergeant, 16124119
Hilton, Thomas A., Technician 5th Grade, 34431000
Wazowicz, Henry A., Private First Class, 33606822
Hirsch, Marvin M., Technician 4th Grade, 16098345
Webber, Herman F., Technician 4th Grade, 16073605
Hodges, Bryan, Technician 5th Grade, 37216249
Weber, Harry S., Technician 5th Grade, 33280994
Holbrook, Theron G., Staff Sergeant, 14139120
Webster, Ernest P., Jr., Private First Class, 34450569
Holmes, Normie, Private First Class, 34450125
Webster, Robert L., Private First Class, 34430627
Hoster, David W., Technician 5th Grade, 33478960
Welborn, Robert W., Corporal, 34430902
Howard, Robert M., Private First Class, 33761659
Wenk, Albert J., Private First Class, 32275697
Hurley, John T., Staff Sergeant, 31204453
Werle, Marvin W., Technician 5th Grade, 37216389
Hynes, Stanley R., Technician 3d Grade, 5282634
Wheeler, James W., Technician 5th Grade, 34440898
Ingham, John R., Technical Sergeant, 16128129
Whelan, Joseph F., Sergeant, 36326586
Ingram, William R., Private, 34369684
Wiggins, Hugh E., Technician 4th Grade, 34971165
Ivanitch, Louis, Corporal, 33829255
Wisniewski, Leo, Technician 4th Grade, 33283281
Ivey, Arvil A., Technician 4th Grade, 34370055
Wishart, Alexander H., Technician 5th Grade, 36564696
Jablonski, Harry J., Private First Class, 36241343
Wolf, Harding F., Technician 5th Grade, 16128130
Jacobs, Irving T., Technician 3d Grade, 36314790
Woody, Samuel J., Staff Sergeant, 34372858
Janovetz, Joseph M., Private First Class, 36071320
Wright, Paul J., Technician 4th Grade, 35018269
Jarrell, Malcolm, Staff Sergeant, 34194742
Wright, Terry E., Corporal, 34430952
Jernigan, James W., Corporal, 34451017
 
1945 statistics illustrating the number of patients admitted at the various locations occupied by the 27th Evacuation Hospital.

1945 statistics illustrating the number of patients admitted at the various locations occupied by the 27th Evacuation Hospital.

Commendation – 27th Evacuation Hospital
HEADQUARTERS XXI CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of the Commanding General
AG 201.22 24 February 1945
SUBJECT: Commendation of the 27th Evacuation Hospital
To: Commanding General, Seventh United States Army, APO 758, US Army

  1. I wish to take this occasion to express my appreciation for the splendid cooperation and efficient service rendered by this Evacuation Hospital during its support of the XXI Corps in the recent Colmar Campaign.
  2. It is understood that this unit processed a considerable number of casualties of the XXI Corps during the reduction of the Colmar Pocket. Reports have reached me of the careful and efficient attention to duty of the Enlisted Men and Commissioned Staff of the 27th Evacuation Hospital and of the splendid professional attainments of the personnel charged with the direct medical and surgical care of the sick and wounded. Realization that this type of medical support was backing the XXI Corps during the Campaign is a splendid and enduring morale factor and the undersigned is deeply appreciative of the important part played by this Hospital during the period indicated.
  3. It is requested that this expression of my appreciation be conveyed to the Commanding Officer of the 27th Evacuation Hospital.
/s/ Frank W. Milburn
/t/ Frank W. MILBURN
Major General, Commanding
Commendation – 27th Evacuation Hospital
AG 330.13      1st Ind.      WGC/JDM/jsh
HEADQUARTERS SEVENTH US ARMY, APO 758, US Army, 3 March 1945
SUBJECT: Commendation of the 27th Evacuation Hospital
To: Commanding Officer, 27th Evacuation Hospital, APO 758, US Army
The Army Commander is pleased in transmitting the Commendation extended members of your organization for a job well done, and adds his own appreciation for the exemplary manner in which the duties assigned them were accomplished, often under trying conditions.
For the Commanding General: /s/ W. G. Caldwell
/t/ W. G. CALDWELL,
Colonel, AGD, Adjutant General

Citation Meritorious Service Unit Plaque – 27th Evacuation Hospital
Award issued by Headquarters, Seventh US Army, APO 758, US Army, General Order No. 302, dated 8 July 1945, by Command of Lieutenant General Wade H. Haislip
The 27th Evacuation Hospital is awarded the Meritorious Service Unit Plaque for superior performance of duty in the accomplishment of exceptionally difficult tasks from 1 January 1945 to 28 February 1945, in France. During this period this Hospital rendered outstanding professional service to many thousands of battle casualties. The great number of admissions necessitated constant operation at far beyond the unit’s normal capacity. As a result of superior service rendered by the personnel of this Hospital, casualties experienced a minimum of suffering and discomfort and many lives were saved. The high quality of service rendered by the 27th Evacuation Hospital has been an important morale factor for the troops it supported and reflected credit upon the Medical Department of the United States Army.

Campaign Credits – 27th Evacuation Hospital
Rome-Arno
Southern France
Rhineland
Central Europe

Vintage postcard illustrating part of the buildings of the Caserne Ladmirault, Baccarat, France, which would twice become home for the 27th Evacuation Hospital.

Vintage postcard illustrating part of the buildings of the Caserne Ladmirault, Baccarat, France, which would twice become home for the 27th Evacuation Hospital.


The MRC Staff are truly grateful for the assistance provided by Scott Pirol, CA, Assistant Professor and University Archivist, for granting them the necessary permission to use some of the images from their 27th Evacuation Hospital Collection 1942-1945 (099-10). The majority of the 27th Evacuation Hospital images used in this concise Unit History are courtesy of the University Archives, University of Illinois, Chicago Library.

This page was printed from the WW2 US Medical Research Centre on 21st October 2018 at 13:38.
Read more: https://www.med-dept.com/unit-histories/27th-evacuation-hospital/