Veteran’s Testimony – Quentin C. Unruh58th General Hospital

Portrait of Technician 4th Grade Quentin C. Unruh, ASN 39848219, taken at the end of his service with the 58th General Hospital.

Portrait of Technician 4th Grade Quentin C. Unruh, ASN 39848219, taken at the end of his service with the 58th General Hospital.

Introduction:

My name is Quentin C. Unruh. I was born on 2 July 1920 in Gossel, Kansas, and later moved to Fresno County, in California. My Parents were Henry D. Unruh and Anna S. Unruh. My education consisted of Primary School, followed by three years of High School. I had 4 siblings; Chester (who served in the Pacific), Gilbert, Twyla, and Ruth.
I got drafted 15 July 1942 from Reedley, California, entering into the service 24 July 1942 in San Francisco, California, and receiving Army Serial Number 39096885. At that time I was the assistant manager of the local Safeway Grocery Store at Reedley (where I worked 14 years). Seventeen (17) of us boarded the train and went to the Presidio in San Francisco, where we had our medical examination and were inducted at about 1500 hours the same day. We were then put on a train with destination the Presidio in Monterey. During the two weeks following, we learned all about doing anything that the sergeant would tell us to do.

We took our IQ test and I alone was sent to Camp Livingston, Alexandria, Louisiana, where the 207th General Hospital (non-affiliated hospital unit activated 10 February 1941, supplied EM to other units destined for overseas such as the 30th General Hospital –ed) was stationed. Cp. Livingston provided large training facilities and had a troop capacity for accommodating 2,092 Officers and 42,831 Enlisted Men.
I arrived Saturday afternoon and drew KP Sunday which was my most beneficial event in the Army and was with me throughout the service. Just before lunch an Officer came into the kitchen and wanted someone to cut up a chicken that he had. No one volunteered so I said I would .When I warped it up and handed it back to him he asked for my name, thanked me and left. Within an hour a soldier came in and asked for Quentin Unruh and I said “here.” He said he was sent to take my place. The Officer had put on my record that I was permanently relieved from special duty. I had no guard duty, no latrine duty or KP the whole time I was in the service.

Vintage pictures illustrating some of the Enlisted Men’s barracks and 207th General Hospital Enlisted personnel, while still training at Camp Livingston, Louisiana. Some of the barracks were constructed of cheap materials, with walls covered with tar paper. The new 58th General Hospital unit was stationed at Camp Livingston from January 15, 1943 until August 11,  1943.

Vintage pictures illustrating some of the Enlisted Men’s barracks and 207th General Hospital Enlisted personnel, while still training at Camp Livingston, Louisiana. Some of the barracks were constructed of cheap materials, with walls covered with tar paper. The new 58th General Hospital unit was stationed at Camp Livingston from January 15, 1943 until August 11, 1943.

Soon after I came to the 207th Gen Hosp unit the change was made from the 207th to the 58th General Hospital. When I transferred to the 58th , the unit was preparing to leave for overseas duty. At that time it was much different than today. Every move the Army made was secret; we could not tell our parents or anyone. But before we shipped out I was granted a seven-day leave which I spent most of the time on the train from Alexandria, Louisiana, to Fresno, California, and back but while I was there I told my parents that when we would go overseas I would sign my full name (Quentin instead of Quin) to my letters which I did.

The various members of the 58th General Hospital were moved to this Camp in increments during the first seven months of 1943.

Being one of the four US Army Camps capable of housing over 40,000 men, Camp Livingston formed an important milestone in the activation and training program of the 58th General Hospital. Situated approximately eleven miles from Alexandria, the site covered a tremendous acreage (almost 48,000). It was divided into large numerically designated areas which were further subdivided into alphabetically defined zones, all of which were connected by excellent macadam roads. The various organizations housed on this site functioned under their own control which in turn was responsible to the higher Headquarters of Camp Livingston.
Camp Livingston, with its tall pine trees and sandy soil would be remembered for its beautiful sunrises and sunsets and its tropical heat in summer including severe low temperatures during the winter.

Picture illustrating some Officers of the advance party en route to Camp Livingston in view of the forthcoming activation of the 58th General Hospital. The picture was taken at the Union Station, St. Louis, Missouri, January 13, 1943.

Picture illustrating some Officers of the advance party en route to Camp Livingston in view of the forthcoming activation of the 58th General Hospital. The picture was taken at the Union Station, St. Louis, Missouri, January 13, 1943.

Activation of the 58th General Hospital took place on 15 January 1943, at Camp Livingston, Alexandria, Louisiana (Army Ground Forces Training Station –ed). The first Officers such as Majors George E. Bear, Thomas G. Ferguson, William A. Heazlett; Captains Eugene M. Hagan, William L. Hauk, Andrew J. McAdams, Charles C. Murphy, and First Lieutenant Thomas E. Purpura formed the cadre of the Medical Officers at the organization’s activation.
Their mission was to organize the unit’s Administrative Department, and select and train the personnel. During the entire stay at Camp Livingston, the various medical personnel were on DS working in the Post’s Station Hospital (an advance party of 8 Officers left St. Louis Union Station for Camp Livingston 13 January 1943 –ed).

Training:

About 27 February 1943, the following Officers: Majors Carl L. Ruder, J. Watson Harmeier, and Captains Arthur W. Harvey and Bastian C. Verschoor received orders to proceed to various Camps and Posts for special training. During April 1943, Lt. Colonels Frank R. Bailey and James M. Strang, accompanied by Major Hyman A. Slesinger, at the time the respective Heads of the Surgical – Medical – and Laboratory Services, were sent to duty to Camp Livingston.

Partial view illustrating William Beaumont Hospital, El Paso, Texas. During World War Two, the basic medical facility at Fort Bliss, expanded to include 147 buildings reaching a total bed capacity of 4,064. The Hospital also ran a School for Medical Department Technicians.

Partial view illustrating William Beaumont Hospital, El Paso, Texas. During World War Two, the basic medical facility at Fort Bliss, expanded to include 147 buildings reaching a total bed capacity of 4,064. The Hospital also ran a School for Medical Department Technicians.

On 18 June 1943 a number of Officers were sent to the Medical Field Service School at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. They included: Majors Elmer S. A. King, David W. Morgan, T. Craig McKee, Stuart N. Rowe, Walter W. Woodhouse, and Joseph A. Soffel; as well as Captains John J. Stubbs, Harold H. Sankey, Samuel R. Perrin, Theodore M. Redman, Connel H. Miller, James N. Stanton, Jr., and E. L. Ringer; and First Lieutenants Thomas E. Purpura, Ralph S. Blasiole, and Knighton V. B. Waite. As soon as their training course was completed, this occurred about 28 July 1943, these men received their orders to proceed to Camp Livingston.
I was sent to Medical School at the William Beaumont General Hospital at El Paso, Texas (named after Surgeon Major Wm Beaumont, 1785-1853, designated US Army General Hospital 26 January 1920, officially opened to patients 1 July 1921, authorized bed capacity 4,000, specialties general & orthopedic surgery, plastic surgery, ophthalmologic surgery, deep x-ray therapy, and psychiatry –ed). I took the surgical course and the sergeant wanted to know if I wanted the X-Ray course as well and he fixed that for me.

The various members of the nursing staff who had been enrolled from Western Pennsylvania Hospital and other Hospitals in the Pittsburgh area had initially been sent to active duty in various Station Hospitals throughout the Zone of Interior before being ordered to join the new unit at Camp Livingston during the latter part of July 1943.

The complete unit was assembled under its own organizational control by the end of July, and its first mission was a complete processing of the individual members of the organization for overseas movement. As POM was underway, all Detached Service ceased and a Training Program was instituted including all forms of classroom activities and field training. The Training for field duty included close order drill – field and road marches – bivouacs – swimming – obstacle course – and instructions in the use of the gas mask.

Early August 1943, the organization was alerted for shipment. All unit equipment and personal luggage was packed and sent to the railway station. Prior to departure the command spent several days living under field conditions with only minimal personal equipment retained.
Approximately at 2400 hours, 11 August 1943, the 58th General entrained for shipment to its POE. Traveling took place in 2 sections with loaded trains converging upon Camp Shanks, Orangeburg, New York (Staging Area for New York P/E –ed)

Two pictures of Private Quentin C. Unruh taken while following training at William Beaumont General Hospital, El Paso, Texas. The period was summer of 1943.

Two pictures of Private Quentin C. Unruh taken while following training at William Beaumont General Hospital, El Paso, Texas. The period was summer of 1943.

Camp Shanks, New York, was a military concentration center with well camouflaged buildings carefully hidden among the trees. It covered an enormous area (acreage: 2009) capable of handling huge numbers of troops (capacity: 2,500 Officers & 46,300 Enlisted Men) and processing them on a daily basis, within a limited period of time, in order to ship them for overseas service.

The 58th Gen Hosp was kept on “alert” status for several days until processing was completed. More training followed including classes and lectures, close order drill, road marches, gas chamber tests, and new subjects such as “abandon ship” drills. Male Officers were quartered among the men in the barracks while the ANC Officers were housed in buildings somewhat apart from the main organization.
Following the final phase, during which the individual records were completed, passes to New York and other not too distant places were obtained with a 12-hour time limit. As details were uncovered, the unit’s orders mentioned departure for Oran, somewhere in North Africa (Algeria –ed), and all of the organization’s supplies were shipped to that destination! However, on the eve of departure, a change of plans occurred whereby the 58th General was transferred to another station within the Zone of Interior.

Early in the morning of 26 August 1943, the group left Camp Shanks for departure by train to Fort Devens, Ayer, Massachusetts (Military Reservation –ed). Upon arrival the same day, the men and women left the train and entrucked for their respective barracks. As soon as the baggage arrived, almost immediately came the call to dinner. The following morning, everything seemed back to normal – duty hours, training program, ordinary procedures. Although many were disappointed to have missed the overseas journey, the location would be remembered as a site of a most comfortable existence within the continental limits of the US. Duty hours were from 0800 to 1700, with days filled with classes, field exercises, and mass athletics. Courses in surgery and medicine were arranged at the various large hospitals operating in Boston

The evening of 30 September 1943 marked the departure from Fort Devens. Trucks were furnished to transport staff, personnel, and equipment to the railhead. An overnight train was waiting to bring the unit to Camp Kilmer, Stelton, New Jersey (Staging Area for New York P/E –ed).
During final preparations, the Staging Area was under great secrecy. All outgoing mail was carefully censored, meals were served in huge mess halls, and the training program proceeded as usual. The stay provided a final opportunity to carefully check all personal equipment, to ship home what was no longer needed, and to purchase any necessary articles before moving overseas. During the final stay at the Camp, the organization was alerted for overseas departure, and on 6 October, final orders were received and a last briefing held among the Officers. An advance detachment of a few Officers and one Chaplain were shipped out about one hour prior to the unit’s departure. They included; Majors Joseph A. Soffel, Elmer S. A. King, William A. Heazlett, T. Craig McKee, Captains Ralph S. Blasiole, Harold H. Sankey, and Harry A. Black, Sr. who were to cross the Atlantic on the S/S “Edmund B. Alexander”, running sick call for approximately 10,000 men on this troopship. Chaplain Walter H. Smith was detached to another transport in the convoy.

Vintage picture of US Army Transport Edmund B. Alexander which did not carry the 58th General Hospital, but was part of the convoy that sailed for the United Kingdom October 8, 1943. However, 9 Medical Officers of the organization crossed the Atlantic aboard this ship while running sick call and a dispensary for the numerous passengers.

Vintage picture of US Army Transport Edmund B. Alexander which did not carry the 58th General Hospital, but was part of the convoy that sailed for the United Kingdom October 8, 1943. However, 9 Medical Officers of the organization crossed the Atlantic aboard this ship while running sick call and a dispensary for the numerous passengers.

The main 58th group proceeded on foot at 0200 the early morning of 7 October 1943 to the trains, and was ferried to the docks. After checking at the gangplank, each individual was assigned to his quarters on the transport, USAT “Monterey”, AP-68. On 8 October we were all aboard the “Monterey” which was carrying some 7,000 troops. We were sent to the top deck where there were no windows, no beds, just the metal floor. The officer said for us to be at ease as we would be there for a while.

United Kingdom:

The ship remained in port until 8 October 1943, when she set sail, part of a large convoy, flanked by destroyers, a tanker, and a battleship.
The loading of the “Monterey” presented many problems which required solutions. Some passengers, mainly the Officers, were allotted state rooms, while the Enlisted Men had to do with small compartments, heavily loaded with tiers of bunks and narrow passages congested by stowed personal gear and equipment. All available deck space was used for troops. Deck passengers remained outdoor for 24 hours after which they exchanged places with the troops quartered below deck. Officers were assigned 8-hour shifts to remain with the troops and were responsible for these interchanges. Meals were only served twice a day, yet the food was simple but sustaining. The ARC personnel provided games and cards to aid pass the long hours and books could be borrowed from the ship’s library. Special work details were organized, calisthenics held, and special boat drills mandatory. Life belts had to be worn at all times, blackout regulations respected, and every man and woman was allotted his proper station in the event that abandonment of the ship would be necessary.

Toward the latter part of the voyage, inclement weather forced indoor quartering of the deck-assigned troops, which caused quite some confusion.

After 9 full days, the coast of Ireland was sighted, and some time later a bunch of British Spitfires flew over . While some of the convoy ships set forth to destinations in Belfast or up the River Clyde, the vessels carrying the 58th General Hospital proceeded to Liverpool, where they arrived on 17 October 1943.

Group picture illustrating 58th General Hospital Officers in front of the Headquarters building at Stowell Park, Gloucestershire, England, some time following the unit’s arrival and where they would remain until May 12, 1944.

Group picture illustrating 58th General Hospital Officers in front of the Headquarters building at Stowell Park, Gloucestershire, England, some time following the unit’s arrival and where they would remain until May 12, 1944.

Following debarkation, the men and women proceeded by train from Liverpool to the town of Foss Cross, a village situated in the heart of Gloucestershire with lots of farmland. From this station, the command entrucked for Stowell Park, where a US-planned Hospital (completely empty upon arrival) was laid out, utilizing the customary Nissen huts on a sloping hillside which had previously been the golf course of the Lord Vesty Estate. Individual quarters consisted of Quonset and Nissen hutments with cement floors, casement windows, supplied with blackout curtains, and a door at either side. Small coal stoves served for heat. The quarters were further provided with British Army cots, mattresses, a small bed table, and a lamp. Ablution buildings were centered in each compound and hot and cold water was available. Decent roads connected the groups of buildings.
On arrival, some of the construction works were still in progress, and as they went on, a plans and training program was set up. Each building required careful scrubbing and cleaning, and as soon as conditions improved, the hospital became ready for the reception of patients. The very first patients were members of the command suffering respiratory infections. The cold, damp weather, required some adaptation and somewhat heavier clothing. The shortage of fuel (mainly coal) at the unit’s early stages of operation required considerable care in its use.

The 58th General Hospital went into operation on 3 December 1943, and soon, casualties arrived from places such as North Africa, Sicily, and Italy. Many came in by air, being received at Chedworth, a British airfield. Normal duty hours were from 0800 to 1700, and lasted until 1300 hours on Sundays. At the 58th Gen Hosp, the Officer in charge of the GU clinic was Captain Charles C. Murphy (surgical section). He was the kindest person and always had me at his side in all the operations and every duty he performed. I was assigned as the senior NCO in charge of the GU clinic.
Apart from the many duties, gas alert exercises and practice drills were held at weekly intervals. Road marches provided the opportunity for viewing some of surrounding countryside. Bikes were furnished as a supplement to speedy transportation and provided some excellent way to visit some of the nearby places within a radius of ten miles.
During December 1943, almost two-fifths of the entire command were on DS at Netley, near Southampton. Their mission was inventory and preparation of part of the “Royal Victoria Hospital” for transfer from British RAMC to US Naval Service, with Lt. Colonel Frank R. Bailey as the Officer in charge.
While stationed at Stowell Park, many Officers and Technicians were sent on various forms of Detached Service. Some went to training sessions or to other medical organizations to render assistance as new US Army Hospitals were set up.

Another picture of Officers, Nurses, and some Enlisted Men of the Surgical Division, while being stationed in the United Kingdom.

Another picture of Officers, Nurses, and some Enlisted Men of the Surgical Division, while being stationed in the United Kingdom.

While located at Stowell Park, the organization treated approximately 20,000 patients.
Early May 1944, Officers arrived from the 160th General Hospital and gradually started taking over the duties of the Officers of the 58th General Hospital. Intensive review and stripping down of personal belongings was the order of the day as preparations for departure were made. Before leaving, the unit lost 2 Officers when Majors Stuart N. Rowe and Thomas W. Martin were transferred to the 160th General as heads of the Neurosurgical and Medical Services respectively.

It was with some nostalgia and mixed feelings that the 58th departed from Stowell Park on 12 May 1944. The Nurses under the care of the CO and the Chief Nurse were temporarily transferred to the 203d Station Hospital at Burford, where they were quartered in hospital wards and underwent various training programs for a period of two months. The remaining personnel, less the above Medical and ANC Officers, entrained at Foss Cross, and after a short trip reached Tidworth, Salisbury Plains, for a bivouac period preceding the Invasion of France. From Tidworth railway station the command was taken by truck several miles to Parkhouse B, a tented troop concentration area on Salisbury Plains, about ½-mile from the village of Shipton Bellinger and within some 10 miles of historical Stonehenge. This would be the first time that the 58th was completely set up under tentage.

I was meanwhile sent to Bournemouth as a Sanitation Officer for a very large camp of soldiers being readied for the Invasion (D-Day 6 June 1944). My job was to inspect both kitchen and latrines for sanitation. There was a massive amount of soldiers there and then on, in the morning of 6 June I woke up and they were all gone so I was sent back to my unit at Parkhouse B.

Group picture illustrating Quentin C. Unruh and friends in front of their Quonset hut, Stowell Park, England. Front row: Quentin C. Unruh; back row, from L to R: Holland C. Swallow, Paul E. Jones, unknown, James H. Day, Jesse Pitts, and Thomas J. Pollock.

Group picture illustrating Quentin C. Unruh and friends in front of their Quonset hut, Stowell Park, England. Front row: Quentin C. Unruh; back row, from L to R: Holland C. Swallow, Paul E. Jones, unknown, James H. Day, Jesse Pitts, and Thomas J. Pollock.

The area was occupied together with the 2d General Hospital. Reveille was at 0600 and the training program occupied the hours of the day. While at the location, Medical Officers were sent on DS in preparation of the Invasion. Some like Captain Charles C. Murphy served on a British Hospital carrier on D-Day where he injured his back, but he recovered fairly well remaining able to work in the clinic.
Majors Elmer S. A. King and David W. Morgan served in orthopedic capacity; Majors Thomas G. Ferguson and T. Craig McKee assisted by Captain Clyde served from 13 June to 15 July 1944 in the triage of air evacuation patients with the 6th Field Hospital at Ramsbury Airfield. Major Joseph A. Soffel, assisted by Sergeant Alfred D. Joncas and Technician 5th Grade Kurt S. Greenbaum went to Newton Abbott for briefing for LST-Hospital (LST 504) duty during D-Day and only returned on 24 June. In fact more than 50% of the personnel served in the Marshaling Area preparing troops for overseas shipment to the Continent.

Partial view of endless rows of Quonset huts and canvas pyramidal tents at Parkhouse B, Salisbury Plain Training Area, Wiltshire, England. Picture taken during the latter part of July 1944, prior to the 58th General Hospital’s departure to its final marshalling and staging area for further movement to France and the continent.

Partial view of endless rows of Quonset huts and canvas pyramidal tents at Parkhouse B, Salisbury Plain Training Area, Wiltshire, England. Picture taken during the latter part of July 1944, prior to the 58th General Hospital’s departure to its final marshalling and staging area for further movement to France and the continent.

The ANC Officers finally rejoined the unit and rumors became rampant as to the impending Channel crossing. Notwithstanding the anticipation of a shipment to France, new orders suddenly came in, directing 75% of the command to Blandford and a smaller contingent to the 237th General Hospital near Marlboro, leaving only an administrative skeleton crew in the camp site. On 21 July, the major part of 58th were transferred to permanent barracks near Blandford. The contingent relieved the 22d General Hospital, which had been running two installations at the time, and spent the following days getting settled and becoming acquainted with the many patients with the assistance of the outgoing staff. On 23 July 1944, the organization took over from the 22d General and within a mere 24 hours work was in full swing! The sojourn was however shortlived as the same day orders came through to turn the patients and inventory back to the 22d. The next morning (24 July 1944 –ed), the unit returned to its tents, chow lines, encouraged only by the thought that the Channel crossing might be coming soon. Moving wasn’t over as another contingent was detached to Marlboro.
By the end of July, adequate preparations had been made for overseas shipment, and finally on 27 July, movement took place to the C-21 Marshaling Area in Southampton, England. After being housed in the tents, a few days were spent with final processing, including the exchange of British money for French Invasion currency. All luggage was transported by truck to the pier and after a moderate march, all male members of the command were assembled at the pier, while the Nurses who had been quartered in a nearby area already boarded the “Llangibby Castle”. It was 29 July 1944.

Partial view of the camouflaged tented area at Marshalling Area C-21, Southampton, England, where the 58th General Hospital awaited their final moving orders, July 28-29, 1943.

Partial view of the camouflaged tented area at Marshalling Area C-21, Southampton, England, where the 58th General Hospital awaited their final moving orders, July 28-29, 1943.

The crossing of the English Channel was calm and uneventful with a clear and sunny day. The ship transported four Army Hospitals – the 25th – 27th – 58th and 227th General Hospitals.

France:

Upon arrival at Utah Beach, Normandy, on 30 July 1944, the personnel were transferred by LCM to the beach and subsequently marched eight full miles to reach Transit Area B.
This grassy plot surrounded by small trees and shrubs presented a scene of fertile activity. After being somehow satisfied with K-Rations and hot coffee, the arrival, of the men’s duffle bags permitted the pitching of pup tents, close to slit trenches and everyone spent a chilly night under the starry skies. The following morning after several K-rats and trips to the water purification unit for filling canteens, the tents were struck, loaded, and following assembly, the organization entrucked for a ride to the 7th Field Hospital at Osmanville, Basse-Normandie, France. The unit was only to remain in Osmanville (NE of Isigny-sur-Mer) for a short period of time, lasting from 31 July to 2 August 1944. First United States Army Headquarters was still to decide as to where our unit was to be stationed.

Picture of Llangibby Castle, which carried the 58th General Hospital across the English Channel to France. Traveling aboard the ship were other medical units such as the 25th – 27th – and 227th General Hospitals.

Picture of Llangibby Castle, which carried the 58th General Hospital across the English Channel to France. Traveling aboard the ship were other medical units such as the 25th – 27th – and 227th General Hospitals.

The 7th Field Hospital served as a reception and concentration center of medical personnel upon arrival in France and also functioned as a dispersion point. From this point the 58th was transferred by motor convoy to another tented hospital site near Bolleville, about 1½ miles from La-Haye-du-Puits, where they were to remain from 22 until 25 September 1944 (in fact the 58th Gen Hosp was never fully operational during this period –ed).

During the short period spent at Transit Area B, rosters had been made up of various Surgical and Shock Teams. These Teams were to be sent out by the 7th Field Hospital the night of arrival to function with First United States Army Field and Evacuation Hospitals operating in Normandy. Traveling by truck in total blackout conditions, the Teams on DS proceeded, accompanied by the sound of Allied AA fire to the 47th Evacuation Hospital where they were quartered overnight. One Surgical Team was to remain for duty at the Hospital, while the others were to proceed the very same night in search of their respective assigned locations. Because of the fog, all Teams however remained with the 47th Evac and were housed in a large ward tent to spend the night. 

This form of Detached Service carried the personnel into far forward positions within sound and sight of cannon fire. The Teams functioned in these tented hospitals giving blood, plasma, and fluids to casualties recently evacuated from the battle field in preparation for surgery and as part of the pre-op and post-op care. The Officers performed major surgery with the patients on litters resting on trestles under bare electric light bulbs with 8 to 10 operating tables functioning under two ward tents laced together. Work was subdivided into 12-hour shifts with each Team serving two OR tables. The patients were brought to the hospital area in ambulances, Hospital Trains, and were subsequently triaged, given shock treatment, x-rayed, and transported to surgery in an almost continuous flow.

Picture illustrating 3 Officers of the 58th General Hospital, on their way to France. Picture taken during the crossing, July 29-30, 1944.

Picture illustrating 3 Officers of the 58th General Hospital, on their way to France. Picture taken during the crossing, July 29-30, 1944.

Surgery in tented Hospitals in forward areas included cleansing and debridement, and removal of foreign bodies of all wounds. Amputations, compound fractures, chest and abdominal penetrations, received priority. The only rest period for the Teams was for chow. Bare light bulbs, camp diesel unit activated, sheet lined tents, canvas covering the ground, central supply sterilizers, water taps flowing, x-rays overhead, hand scrubbing, litters of casualties in the entry waiting, continuous procession of litter bearers, filling charts and records … an orderly turmoil, yet remarkably efficient.

The Teams on DS served in the forward areas until the latter part of August and were then returned to the parent organization near La-Haye-du-Puits.

Composition of the Teams

The Surgical Team under Lt. Colonel Frank R. Bailey including Major Joseph A. Soffel, Captain Ralph S. Blasiole, Second Lieutenant Mildred A. Wallace, Technicians 5th Grade Dave Borer and Jim S. Blake, served with the 44th – 47th – 91st – 97th Evacuation Hospitals in the region of Brécey, Torigny-sur-Vire, Saint-Lô, Mortain, and Domfront, France.

The Surgical Team under Major Thomas G. Ferguson including Major Andrew J. McAdams, assisted by Second Lieutenants Cornelia A. Boney and Doris K. Gleim, Technicians 4th Grade Alfred D. Joncas and William F. Albrecht, served mainly with the 91st Evacuation Hospital in the region of Brécey and Marigny, France.

Picture taken aboard LST # 504 enroute to France. The vessel carried the vehicles and drivers of the 58th General Hospital to Utah Beach, Normandy, where debarkation took place July 30, 1944.

Picture taken aboard LST # 504 enroute to France. The vessel carried the vehicles and drivers of the 58th General Hospital to Utah Beach, Normandy, where debarkation took place July 30, 1944.

The Orthopedic Team under Major David W. Morgan, including Captain William L. Hauk, assisted by Second Lieutenants Stephanie Wekluk and Jeannette M. Bodis, Technician 3d Grade Joseph Mike and Technician 5th Grade Milburn M. Gilcrease, chiefly served with the 5th – 96th – 97th – 107th Evacuation Hospitals in a similar area.

The Shock Team composed of Captains Eugene M. Hagan and J. Eisenberg, Second Lieutenants Thelma Anstead and Anna B. Pacek, assisted by Technicians 5th Grade John S. McMurray and Clifford W. Glascock, served with the 51st Field Hospital near Saint-Lô, and was detached east as far as Bagnolle, caring for casualties resulting from and subsequent to the Saint-Lô breakthrough.

The Shock Team composed of Captains Harry A. Black and Charles C. Huston, assisted by Second Lieutenants Helen Walters and Mildred N. Furlong, Technician 4th Grade Robert W. Wallace and Technician 5th Grade Kenneth E. Jones mainly functioned with the 7th Field Hospital located some fifteen miles from Saint-Lô and cared for the many local battle casualties, including those patients brought in from Mortain and Brécey.

The Shock Team composed of Captains Frank T. Herron and Thomas E. Purpura, assisted by Second Lieutenants Agnes C. Glunt and Martha M. Erkkila, and several Medical / Surgical Technicians, were sent to the Brest Peninsula to serve primarily with the 12th Evacuation Hospital.

Partial view illustrating personnel of the 58th General Hospital pitching their individual tents at Osmanville, Normandy, where they joined the 7th Field Hospital which served as a reception and concentration center for medical personnel arriving in Normandy. The organization would only spent a short period of time in this location (July 31 – August 2, 1944).

Partial view illustrating personnel of the 58th General Hospital pitching their individual tents at Osmanville, Normandy, where they joined the 7th Field Hospital which served as a reception and concentration center for medical personnel arriving in Normandy. The organization would only spent a short period of time in this location (July 31 – August 2, 1944).

The Hospital site at Bolleville was divided into several areas, with the medical installation set up on a sloping hillside with concrete platforms and proper drainage in place (courtesy of the Corps of Engineers –ed). Running water was provided by a well with the help of diesel generators. Officers and Nurses were quartered in opposite sides of the grassy field, gradually sloping down to the railroad line running between Cherbourg and Paris. The EM were initially housed in pup tents and later moved to the large squad tents on the hillside beyond. The area had been bitterly fought over less than a month before and showed many signs of Infantry occupation (shelter trenches and foxholes dug under the trees –ed).
During this bivouac period, camp duties were light. After the unit’s field equipment arrived it was almost immediately transferred on orders from higher Headquarters to the 30th General Hospital nearby. The 58th Supply Officer was told to obtain the equipment from the ships at Utah Beach. By September 1944, the Hospital was ready for the reception of patients. At this time however, this was 21 September, orders were received to move the unit forward and the equipment had to be repacked. From 22 September 1944 on, the 58th General was enroute across France … after an advance party had been sent out to reconnoiter and prepare a new site.
The organization moved by truck to a railway head, boarded a Hospital Train and started a journey not without its discomforts. The train was a mix of old boxcars, painted white inside, loaded with 3-tiers of litters supported on racks and included a number of the famous “40 x 8s”. Frequent detours and stops had to be made, serving hot meals was almost impossible, and infected water caused an unprecedented wave of intestinal infection. The command passed through a number of damages and destroyed towns, cities, and villages, finally reached Toul, in Lorraine, on 25 September. This town still bore the marks of the Great War and had suffered more recent damage as well. The command entrucked to its tented installation on a cold and rainy day, and set about to settle down on a level field, a short distance from the road, with tall trees and low hills in the background.
While at the new location, a number of people were sent on DS to the 94th Medical Gas Treatment Battalion (CO > Major Burry –ed) about two miles away. This Air Evacuation Holding Unit had the mission of grouping any arriving ambulance-borne casualties, housed temporarily on litters on the ground, and evacuate them to the United Kingdom by C-47 aircraft. The airfield was a grassy and soggy strip which hampered both landings and departures. Only emergency surgery was rendered, dressings changed, and feeding provided during the waiting period.
During the unit’s twelve-day stay at Toul, the usual camp duties were maintained. The driving rains and the cold weather, necessitated the distribution of tent stoves with some careful rationing of fuel (shortages –ed).

Picture of 58th General Hospital personnel enjoying some food, during a stop while traveling to La-Haye-du-Puits, Normandy. A partially destroyed train is visible in the background.

Picture of 58th General Hospital personnel enjoying some food, during a stop while traveling to La-Haye-du-Puits, Normandy. A partially destroyed train is visible in the background.

The 58th left Toul for Commercy, also in Lorraine, 6 October 1944, where it arrived the same day.

For the first time in several months, the unit was afforded the luxury of quarters inside buildings! The “Hôpital Pasteur”, the “Ecole Supérieure de Jeunes Filles”, and the “Quartier Marguerite” would serve as living quarters. Cots and tent stoves were obtained for use during states hours of the day. After more fuel had been obtained it became possible to enjoy hot baths at regular intervals. The scenic beauty of this “old” town (with lots of classic French buildings –ed) was recorded in many photographs taken by the personnel. The limited duration of this bivouac period was necessitated by the advance of the Third United States Army in the region, as Army Headquarters did not give permission to set up General Hospitals within active Army territory (fighting was only a mere 25 miles away from Commercy –ed).

On 23 October 1944, the organization received new movement orders. This time the 58th General would be quartered in former French military barracks dating back to Napoléon in Lérouville. The area had been occupied by German troops during the Great War and consisted of four rows of one-story building in the center, with four large two-story buildings in the background, all bounded by numerous smaller buildings. The site had been occupied by French troops in 1940, taken over by the German Heer in May 1940, and a US Ordnance Company had recently lived in it for some time, after routing the enemy. Consequently, the buildings were in a horrible state of disrepair due to shell fire, the explosion of an ammo dump in the neighborhood and systematic destruction by the departing enemy.

Daily scene taken at La Haye-du-Puits, Normandy, France. After enjoying chow, male and female personnel wash, rinse and clean their mess kits in the corresponding immersion containers. Picture taken some time during September 1944.

Daily scene taken at La Haye-du-Puits, Normandy, France. After enjoying chow, male and female personnel wash, rinse and clean their mess kits in the corresponding immersion containers. Picture taken some time during September 1944.

The first weeks of the 58th’s occupation presented an enormous task in an attempt to restore order out of chaos. The task included removing all debris, providing drainage, cleaning the rooms to be used as hospital wards, and installing the necessary equipment for a suitable operation. Reception of patients, evacuated from the frontlines began within a matter of days. The organization was to function as a Holding Unit with a forty-eight hour evacuation period for the patients. Hospital trains, bringing 250 to 500 patients arrived several times per day, convoying the wounded from the railhead to the 58th General Hospital. All incoming patients were duly examined, triaged, fed, rested, and every emergency surgery rendered. While at Lérouville, Lorraine, Third Platoon, 28th Field Hospital with a mobile OR and extra X-Ray equipment was assigned and established in the rear of the future surgical building. The unusual downpour of rain, accompanied by freezing temperatures in October made working conditions difficult. Following progress of the many restoration works, including a new electrical system, the introduction of diesel generators, repair of the plumbing system, and painting of the quarters and wards, an efficient and satisfactory installation was produced.
Evacuation was therefore extended to a 30-days – 60-days – and finally to a 120-days policy, and the volume of definitive surgery gradually increased. Approximately 20,000 casualties were treated at this site.
After several months, the addition of civilian personnel and the use of 250 German PWs, permitted the release of military personnel for more detailed service for the patients. Meanwhile the ARC personnel rendered excellent service to the patients. French civilian groups performed folk dances and groups of children were brought out from various schools to sing and entertain the patients. A library was set up, reading and music rooms established, and ping pong facilities made available. Bi-weekly movies were presented and a chapel for seating three hundred persons constructed. The PX furnished the customary items such as cigarettes, cigars, candy, and soap as they were available. Eventually more luxuries such as ice cream and Coca-Cola were also dispensed.

Picture illustrating a group of ANC Officers during the Hospital’s stay near La-Haye-du-Puits, Normandy. The 58th General Hospital site was located at Bolleville.

Picture illustrating a group of ANC Officers during the Hospital’s stay near La-Haye-du-Puits, Normandy. The 58th General Hospital site was located at Bolleville.

Between 9 November and 21 November 1944, a Shock Team composed of Majors J. T. Norcross, Captains Clyde, Knighton V. B. Waite, Charles C. Huston, assisted by First Lieutenant Mabel H. Taglieber, Katherine M. Duralia, Martha Cover, and a group of Enlisted Men functioned with the 109th Evacuation Hospital, established at Thiacourt, France.

The coming Christmas season represented a strenuous time, with artillery fire audible from as far as Metz, active enemy aircraft appearing on a nightly basis, and the unannounced German breakthrough in the Belgian Ardennes. As a consequence of this new situation, all personnel were warned to have emergency equipment available for immediate evacuation and rosters had been made up for those who were to remain behind with some of the patients who couldn’t be moved. Armed watches were maintained because of the presence of German prisoners of war in the area. While the defeat of the Germans in the Ardennes was promising, the tremendous influx of casualties from this sector was a lasting reminder of the seriousness of the recent military campaign.

The Hospital was among the closest General Hospitals to the Bulge fighting, during which we would get trainloads of injured that we would process, the situation remained critical as those that might have gone back to duty were retained and those that were too seriously wounded or injured to move also remained. Our wounded included German casualties who were retained until we could get them back to the PW enclosure. There were times that we in the clinic worked around the clock. Captain C. Murphy was not about to release a patient unless he was sure he was ready to be discharged.

Picture showing Captain John J. Stubbs and some of his Medical Division crew in France. Picture probably taken while stationed in Commercy, France, October 1944.

Picture showing Captain John J. Stubbs and some of his Medical Division crew in France. Picture probably taken while stationed in Commercy, France, October 1944.

Between March and May 1945, several Officers were transferred from the unit, and because of the need to augment frontline troops, a number of Enlisted hospital personnel were physically evaluated, and if found positive, transferred to forward units (mainly to serve as Infantry replacements –ed), and in part replaced by returned combat soldiers.
In May of 1945 Captain Charles Murphy was sent home as the pain in his back became unbearable and I was left in charge of the clinic. If I needed help I was to call upon Captain Harry A. Black, Sr. who was next door (medical section).
From 20 April to 30 May 1945, Majors T. Craig McKee, Captain Charles C. Huston, including a number of EM were serving on Detached Service at Sedan, France, for treating RAMPs who were prepared for return to the ZI. From 11 May up to early June 1945, Captain Eugene M. Hagan, and Private First Class Calvin E. Paige, worked for ADSEC Headquarters in Fulda, Germany, traveling through most of the American-occupied portion of Germany, as part of Hospital Team No. 46.

Change of Command – 58th General Hospital (May 1945)

During the unit’s stay at Lérouville, Lorraine, France (stay 23 October 1944 > 12 July 1945), a number of organizational changes were implemented:

  • Colonel Frank R. Bailey was boarded by the 50th Gen Hosp at Lérouville, awaiting return to the Zone of Interior. He was replaced by Colonel Harry B. Luscombe (the latter would eventually be replaced by Colonel George B. West in August 1945).
  • Major Carl Ruder became the new Executive Officer, replacing Lt. Colonel James M. Strang who was transferred to the 100th General Hospital.
  • Captain Irwin was assigned the duty of Adjutant relieving Captain John I. Spreckelmyer.
  • Captain Agnes Patterson was transferred to the 16th General Hospital, with Captain Ruth C. Baldwin taking over as Chief Nurse.
  • Captain Kausler became the new Protestant Chaplain, relieving Captain Richard D. Johnson, while Captain Kenny replaced Captain Walter H. Smith as Roman Catholic Chaplain.
Picture illustrating Major Thomas G. Ferguson, Surgical Division, in front of the building housing Surgery. Picture probably taken at Commercy, France, October 1944.

Picture illustrating Major Thomas G. Ferguson, Surgical Division, in front of the building housing Surgery. Picture probably taken at Commercy, France, October 1944.

Special Awards – 58th General Hospital

While stationed at Lérouville, Lorraine, France, several members of the command were awarded the following decorations and citations:

  • Major Joseph A. Soffel, O-410441 – Certificate of Merit for conspicuously meritorious and outstanding performance of military duty.
  • Captain John P. Bowser, O-368316 – Bronze Star Medal for meritorious achievement in connection with military operations against the enemy in Africa and Italy.
  • Technician 5th Grade Douglas W. Schaffer, 36105960 – Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement in connection with military operations against the enemy.
  • Private First Class Herbert D. Betters, 31059871 – Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action against the enemy.
  • One (1) Officer and 25 Enlisted Men assigned to the unit were awarded Purple Hearts for wounds sustained during combat duty.

The termination of the war with Germany, officially celebrated 8 May 1945, revived the necessity for additional personnel to become available for duty in Far East and the Pacific. Those members of the command who were physically fit were considered available for service in forward installations or for transfer to China-Burma-India bound units. A volunteer group of ANC Officers were sent from the hospital for this purpose.
V-E Day was celebrated with a dress parade and appropriate ceremonies in Lérouville.

Partial view of the X-Ray Room, either at Commercy or Lérouville, France. The X-Ray Division was headed by Major James B. Hall.

Partial view of the X-Ray Room, either at Commercy or Lérouville, France. The X-Ray Division was headed by Major James B. Hall.

As the patient census decreased, speculations at to the future of the 58th General became a prominent topic. Eventually word was received that the unit would be placed in a type IV Category with potential return to the United States and discharge. This was accompanied with the reclassification of personnel, the possible transfer of members of the command, and the introduction of the Point System. At this point the influx of high-pointers and transfers out of low-pointers redirected the channels of thought.

On 19 June 1945, orders were received to transfer all the patients to the 50th General Hospital in Commercy, Lorraine. The wards were closed and all the equipment returned to a Medical Depot at Foug.
A training program was once again the order of the day with class hours alternating with functions. Athletics were conducted in the afternoon. Following a long period of speculation, a program began to take form with respect to the organization’s immediate future.

An advance group was sent detached to Châlons-sur-Marne, in the Champagne-Ardenne region, to inspect the future site of the 58th. On 12 July 1945, the command was moved by trucks, ambulances, and train, to the town of Châlons, where it was to relieve the 239th General Hospital. The departure of the unit was marred by the loss of its Commanding Officer, Lt. Colonel Frank R. Bailey who was to return to Zone of Interior (he remained as part of the rear guard in Lérouville).
Upon arrival, the Officers were quartered in two-story buildings across the street from the 16th General Hospital, stationed about 1½ mile distant. The heavy equipment and most of the Enlisted Men were set up in the “Commodore Barracks” and meals were furnished by the unit’s own mess. Within only a few days the 58th General took over an already functioning installation, Hospital Plant 4359. The main portion of the site included a former French Military Hospital (Hôpital Militaire –ed) consisting of three huge three-story buildings placed one behind the other and connected by a covered hallway. After dividing the buildings into the respective sections and functions, a separate group of “caserne” buildings were converted in to hospital wards, each housing up to 140 patients and containing a kitchen and an ablution unit. This smaller compound was in turn surrounded by yet more small buildings housing the unit’s motor pool, carpenter shop, patients, EM mess, etc. A Quonset hut was set up by the ARC for a recreation center and a huge garage-like structure turned into a movie theater for patients and personnel.

Unidentified servicemen of the 58th General Hospital, probably during their stay in France.

Unidentified servicemen of the 58th General Hospital, probably during their stay in France.

While at Châlons-sur-Marne, the 58th operated as a station hospital, caring for approximately 80,000 troops stationed in the Assembly Area camps nearby. The various services were kept extremely busy. Each morning, ambulances brought patients from the Assembly Areas for admission to the hospital or treatment in the respective clinics. Patients requiring hospitalization were transferred from the receiving by hand litter, wheel litter, or ambulance to the respective wards. Due to the high patient census, the entire medical and surgical personnel were called for duty on many occasions, and were therefore available on a twenty-four hour basis.
With the departure of the former CO, some minor changes in the unit were further introduced. Major Elmer S. A. King was appointed Chief of Surgery (replacing Lt. Colonel Frank R. Bailey) and Major George E. Bair became the new Chief of Medical Service (replacing Lt. Colonel James M. Strang).

On 11 August 1945, Colonel Harry B. Luscombe, current CO, received orders transferring him to the 179th General Hospital. He was replaced within the next twenty-four hours by Colonel George B. West (previously CO of the 179th Gen Hosp) who took over as new Commanding Officer of the 58th General Hospital 12 August 1945.
Shortly after his arrival, the new Commander arranged recreational trips to Luxembourg City and Paris. The 58th was augmented from time to time by the arrival of replacements; however, the transfer of old personnel did never compensate for the loss of the men, so that a peak patient load often had to be cared for by less than half of the Medical Officers originally attached to the organization. V-J Day was celebrated quietly, because of the high patient census.

The End:

On 4 September orders were received for the 58th General Hospital to cease operations, and on 11 September 1945 the medical installations were taken over by the 195th General Hospital. As the transfer was accomplished within a very short period of days, various members of the command were assigned other duties.
We finally closed the hospital on 15 September 1945 and the unit then proceeded from staging areas to staging areas on their way home. Every soldier obtained his ASR core based on the “Point system”. I don’t recall how many points sent you home but I did not have enough and was subsequently attached to a Hospital in Okinawa and sent to a staging area at Marseille, Southern France. We were waiting for a troop transport to take us through the Suez Canal and to the Pacific but instead were notified that the Japanese had meanwhile surrendered and we could sail for the Zone of Interior and go home.

Picture showing the main entrance to the 58th General Hospital, at Châlons-sur-Marne, in Northern France. This would be the Hospital’s last operational setup in France. The organization occupied the former French Military Hospital buildings from July 12, 1945 until September 15, 1945.

Picture showing the main entrance to the 58th General Hospital, at Châlons-sur-Marne, in Northern France. This would be the Hospital’s last operational setup in France. The organization occupied the former French Military Hospital buildings from July 12, 1945 until September 15, 1945.

Lt. Colonel H. A. Slesinger and Major Walter W. Woodhouse were transferred to Germany. Captains Ralph S. Blasiole, Charles C. Huston, and James N. Stanton, Jr., were sent to various organizations in France. Captains John B. Campbell and John J. Kifer were transferred to Assembly Areas in France. Major T. Craig McKee joined Surgeon’s Headquarters at Reims, France. Major William A. Heazlett, and Captains Samuel R. Perrin and John J. Stubbs were assigned for service in the CBI Theater, and Captain Harold R. Sankey joined the Orthopedic Hospital at Marseille, Southern France. As the war with Japan was over, those men assigned for the CBI Theater or the SPA were kept aboard ship with destination the United States, and were not transferred to this Theater (change of orders was received by radio while enroute to the ZI –ed).

Further changes occurred when on 15 September 1945, new orders were received, to return a number of Officers to the States under the “Green Project” plan because of a need for Physicians in the Zone of Interior. Those fortunate to be selected were sent by truck to Paris, France. As soon as notified, the Officers were taken to the airfield and shipped via Lisbon, Portugal, or direct to the Azores, and then, to Newfoundland, and Washington. Inclement weather however, necessitated the bumping off of many members of the command at the Azores Islands where they remained for two days. The travel then continued by way of Bermuda to Washington. From Washington D.C., it went by train to Harrisburg, then by bus to Indiantown Gap, Indiantown, Pennsylvania (Training Center –ed), and another further move to the Separation Center completed the return home.
High-pointers were transferred to the Separation Center and discharged. The low-point Officers of the 58th were sent home on leave with orders to return to the Separation Centers for discharge.

The ANC Officers had meanwhile been transferred from Châlons-sur-Marne to Camp “Pittsburgh” (one of the City camps) in the Reims Assembly Area. They were later moved to another Assembly Area near Le Havre, France, and returned to the United States aboard the “Vulcania”, arriving at Staten Island 10 November 1945. The group of Nurses were then taken to Camp Kilmer, Stelton, New Jersey (Staging Area for New York P/E) and then to Fort Dix, Wrightstown, New Jersey (Training & Pre-Staging Center) to be processed immediately.
The majority of the Nurses were discharged, except a small group who reenlisted for periods ranging from three to eighteen months (only 14 did reenlist –ed). Their baggage was sent to Marseille, Southern France, with the Enlisted personnel and the remaining Officers of the unit.
As the current Chief Nurse Captain Ruth Baldwin had proceeded to serve in Germany with the Army of Occupation, First Lieutenant Mildred A. Wallace acted as Chief Nurse for the return home. Captain Agnes Patterson (currently Chief Nurse at the 16th General Hospital –ed) acted as Finance Officer on the trip home.

The remaining Enlisted Men under the charge of Colonel George B. West, CO, assisted by Captains James N. Stanton, Jr., Arthur Harvey, and Warrant Officer Adamaciewicz, were transferred between 15 September 1945 and 5 November 1945 from Châlons-sur-Marne, to various Assembly and Staging Areas in France, with the majority ending up at the Calas Assembly and Staging Area, near Marseille, Southern France, where they remained until the early part of November. Following orders for embarkation, they finally were returned to the States on the Liberty Ship “Felix M. Grundy”, arriving in Newport News, 16 November 1945.

On the return of the organization in the Zone of Interior, only 47 out of the original EM of the 58th General Hospital were on board the ship.

Picture illustrating the 58th General Hospital Headquarters building at Châlons-sur-Marne, France.

Picture illustrating the 58th General Hospital Headquarters building at Châlons-sur-Marne, France.

The 58th General Hospital was officially deactivated at 2359 hours, 6 November 1945, at Camp Patrick Henry (Staging Area for Hampton Roads P/E –ed), Oriana, Virginia, United States. I finally got transferred to Camp Beal California 8 December and was honorably discharged on 15 December 1945.

On 5 January 1946 I went to the Safeway Grocery Store in Reedley, California and introduced myself to the new manager. He said, “When can you start to work? You are the assistant manager.”
I finally married Fern Hylton, on 15 March 1947. We were blessed with 4 children; Clifford Duane, Gloria Yvonne, Melvin Quin, and Debbie Sue.

I made a lot of good friends during my time with the 58th General Hospital. We had several reunions after we got out. We stopped after several years and, one by one, we slowly passed. Today, at age 95 I would think I am about one of the last few remaining members …

Unit Personnel Roster:

United States Army 58th General Hospital (October 1943)

Portrait of Dr. Frank R. Bailey, Commanding Officer of the 58th General Hospital from April 1, 1943 until July 12, 1945 (at the time he was boarded by the 50th General Hospital, and awaiting transportation to the Zone of Interior). Lieutenant Colonel F. R. Bailey had meanwhile been replaced by Colonel  Harry B. Luscombe (who had already commanded the unit in January 1943).

Portrait of Dr. Frank R. Bailey, Commanding Officer of the 58th General Hospital from April 1, 1943 until July 12, 1945 (at the time he was boarded by the 50th General Hospital, and awaiting transportation to the Zone of Interior). Lieutenant Colonel F. R. Bailey had meanwhile been replaced by Colonel Harry B. Luscombe (who had already commanded the unit in January 1943).

Surgical Division
Lt. Colonel Frank R. Bailey (Commanding Officer + Chief Surgical Division)
Major Thomas G. Ferguson
Major Elmer S. A. King
Major T. Craig McKee (transferred as of September 1945)
Major David W. Morgan
Major Stuart N. Rowe (transferred to 160th Gen Hosp as of May 1944)
Major Joseph A. Soffel
Major Walter W. Woodhouse (transferred as of September 1945)
Captain Delmas L. Cribbs
Captain William L. Hauk
Captain Andrew J. McAdams
Captain Charles C. Murphy
Captain John A. Nave (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Captain Theodore M. Redman (transferred to 5th Gen Hosp + 97th Gen Hosp as of December 1943)
Captain E. L. Ringer (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Captain Harold H. Sankey
Captain James N. Stanton, Jr. (transferred as of September 1945)
First Lieutenant Ralph S. Blasiole (transferred as of September 1945)
First Lieutenant William O. Linhart (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
First Lieutenant Knighton Van Buren Waite

Picture taken during one of the many bivouacs in Normandy, France, summer of 1944.

Picture taken during one of the many bivouacs in Normandy, France, summer of 1944.

Medical Division
Lt. Colonel James M. Strang (Executive Officer + Chief Medical Division)
(transferred to 100th Gen Hosp as of May 1945)
Major George E. Bair
Major J. Watson Harmeier
Major William A. Heazlett (transferred to CBI as of September 1945)
Major Thomas W. Martin (transferred to 160th Gen Hosp as of May 1944)
Major Carl L. Ruder
Captain Frank T. Herron
Captain Charles C. Huston (transferred as of September 1945)
Captain Connel H. Miller (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Captain Samuel R. Perrin (transferred to CBI as of September 1945)
Captain John J. Stubbs (transferred to CBI as of September 1945)
First Lieutenant Harry A. Black, Sr. (transferred as of May 1945)
First Lieutenant Thomas E. Purpura

Laboratory Division
Major Hyman A. Slesinger (transferred as of September 1945)
Captain Eugene M. Hagan
Captain Alfred F. Knoll (transferred to Aux Surg Gp as of May 1944)

Picture of Technician 4th Grade Holland C. Swallow, ASN 37331236 (Quentin C. Unruh’s best friend –ed).

Picture of Technician 4th Grade Holland C. Swallow, ASN 37331236 (Quentin C. Unruh’s best friend –ed).

Dental Division
Captain John B. Cunningham (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Captain Paul E. Gardner (transferred to 82d A/B Div as of April 1944)
Captain Charles A. Harmeier
Captain Conrad Spilka
First Lieutenant Robert D. Ambrose (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
First Lieutenant John E. Campbell (transferred as of September 1945)
First Lieutenant John J. Kifer (transferred as of September 1945)

X-Ray Division
Major James B. Hall (evacuated to ZI as of October 1944)
Captain John F. Maurer (transferred to 59th Gen Hosp as of December 1943)

Chaplains
Captain Richard D. Johnson (Protestant)
Captain Walter H. Smith (Catholic)

Picture of Technician 3d Grade Lenvill B. Martin.

Picture of Technician 3d Grade Lenvill B. Martin.

Roster of Nurses

Captain Agnes M. Patterson (Principal Chief Nurse) (transferred to 16th Gen Hosp in 1945) Second Lieutenant Marie Kohler
First Lieutenant Margaret B. Borland Second Lieutenant Anna H. Lilley
First Lieutenant Elise E. Meyer (transferred as of December 1943) Second Lieutenant Catherine F. Logue
Second Lieutenant Teresa M. Aigner Second Lieutenant Elvi I. Matta
Second Lieutenant Mary B. Allen Second Lieutenant Mary C. Marshall
Second Lieutenant Thelma L. Anstead Second Lieutenant Kathryn A. Matkowski
Second Lieutenant Loretta E. Applegate Second Lieutenant Mercedes A. McCort
Second Lieutenant June E. Barth (transferred to ZI as of February 1944) Second Lieutenant Mildred D. McNeill
Second Lieutenant Frances M. Bedwell Second Lieutenant Essa L. Michel
Second Lieutenant Mary E. Beichner Second Lieutenant Sue L. Michlo
Second Lieutenant Jeannette M. Bodis Second Lieutenant Anna F. Milton
Second Lieutenant Cornelia A. Boney Second Lieutenant Marie A. Miller
Second Lieutenant Eloise B. Brinkworth Second Lieutenant Mary H. Mitsch
Second Lieutenant Elizabeth S. Cadman Second Lieutenant Frances E. Morrow (transferred as of December 1943)
Second Lieutenant Mildred K. Caldwell Second Lieutenant Katherine R. Norwood
Second Lieutenant Mary C. Campbell Second Lieutenant Virginia M. O’Donnell
Second Lieutenant Mary V. Campbell Second Lieutenant Anna B. Pacek
Second Lieutenant Jennie L. Caparoso Second Lieutenant Mary G. Quigley
Second Lieutenant Mildred O. Conin Second Lieutenant Thelma L. Raphael
Second Lieutenant Vivian W. Doub Second Lieutenant Martha V. Repp
Second Lieutenant Pauline R. Douds Second Lieutenant Freda Rice
Second Lieutenant Hazel B. Dove Second Lieutenant Julia M. Ring
Second Lieutenant Katherine M. Duralia Second Lieutenant Caroline C. Riva
Second Lieutenant Kathleen I. Durstine Second Lieutenant Dorothy E. Ryan
Second Lieutenant Martha M. Erkkila Second Lieutenant Julia R. Sache
Second Lieutenant Anna R. Fisher (transferred as of December 1943) Second Lieutenant Rebecca Sack
Second Lieutenant Martha J. Fox Second Lieutenant Margaretta Salata
Second Lieutenant Mildred N. Furlong Second Lieutenant Agnes A. Salopek
Second Lieutenant Rose A. Gadosy Second Lieutenant Hildegarde E. Schultz
Second Lieutenant Artie M. Garrett Second Lieutenant Elizabeth M. Seelhorst
Second Lieutenant Mary A. Gaugham Second Lieutenant Anna E. Shaffer
Second Lieutenant Doris K. Gleim Second Lieutenant Geraldine A. Smith
Second Lieutenant Agnes C. Glunt Second Lieutenant Ruth A. Stepek
Second Lieutenant Marian L. Gosser Second Lieutenant Mary K. Striebich
Second Lieutenant Sara M. Greenfield Second Lieutenant Helen I. Tadowski
Second Lieutenant Mary E. Gulas Second Lieutenant Mabel H. Taglieber
Second Lieutenant Esther H. Guthridge (transferred as of December 1943) Second Lieutenant Janet M. Turnbull
Second Lieutenant Ruth W. Haddick Second Lieutenant Pearl Tyner
Second Lieutenant Harriet Haines Second Lieutenant Frances H. Vukovich
Second Lieutenant Hester S. Halderman Second Lieutenant Gladys F. Wagner
Second Lieutenant Mary D. Hartman Second Lieutenant Mildred A. Wallace
Second Lieutenant Dorothy L. Hileman Second Lieutenant Bernice V. Wasilewski
Second Lieutenant Mary M. Hunt Second Lieutenant Helen M. Weakland
Second Lieutenant Edith S. Jack Second Lieutenant Beryl F. Weimer
Second Lieutenant Clara E. Jacob Second Lieutenant Stephanie Wekluk
Second Lieutenant Laura E. Johns Second Lieutenant Stella M. Wenckunas (transferred as of December 1943)
Second Lieutenant Geraldine Jones Second Lieutenant Helen G. Wissinger (transferred as of December 1943)
Second Lieutenant Mary M. Kennedy Second Lieutenant Dorothy E. Woods
Second Lieutenant Thelma J. Kinney Second Lieutenant Angela M. Zarella
Second Lieutenant Esther V. Klee
Picture taken during one of the many bivouacs in Normandy, France, summer of 1944.

Picture taken during one of the many bivouacs in Normandy, France, summer of 1944.

Other Services

Second Lieutenant Alvina R. Beran (Hospital Dietitian) Second Lieutenant Pearl Tyner (Hospital Dietitian)
Second Lieutenant Marguerite Sillery (Physiotherapy Aide)

American Red Cross

Annette Brigham Laurie Shoup
Margaret Erlanger Grace White
Alice Mendenhall
Barbara Preston
Picture of Technician 4th Grade George S. Harris, while serving in Normandy with the 58th General Hospital.

Picture of Technician 4th Grade George S. Harris, while serving in Normandy with the 58th General Hospital.

Roster of Enlisted Men

Technician 5th Grade Glen R. Dillard (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private First Class Oliver W. Todd (transferred to 48th Fld Hosp late 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Homer R. Downum (1945) Private First Class Alex A. Toth (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Alfred J. Dully Private First Class Joseph Tresky (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Donald L. Duston (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private First Class Leonard Tucker (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Alciviredes T. Economos Private First Class Frederick P. Tuttle
Technician 5th Grade Adam E. Eisele Private First Class Joseph Valent (1945)
Technician 5th Grade George W. Ferris (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private First Class Ray E. Ward
Technician 5th Grade Hershel H. Foley (1945) Private First Class James E. Waynick
Technician 5th Grade Samuel G. Fordham (1945) Private First Class George W. Weatherspoon (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Aaron L. Freedman Private First Class Robert S. Weeks
Technician 5th Grade William S. Freeman Private First Class Charles M. Werner
Technician 5th Grade James L. Fritz (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private First Class John E. Widdows
Technician 5th Grade John D. Frylinck, Jr. Private First Class Felton W. Williams (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Amado Garcia, Jr. Private First Class John W. Willis
Technician 5th Grade Kenneth Gerber Private First Class Carson Wimbley (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Charles J. Gervais Private First Class George F. Windem
Technician 5th Grade Milburn M. Gilcrease Private First Class John P. Woods
Technician 5th Grade Clifford W. Glascock (1945) Private First Class James A. Wyatt
Technician 5th Grade Kurt S. Greenbaum Private First Class Walter Yuen
Technician 5th Grade George S. Harris Private First Class Edward A. Zazycki (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Joshua M. Helton (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Richard E. Adair (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade William T. Hesson (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Eugene H. Alexander (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Robert J. Hole Private Chester Allen
Technician 5th Grade Charles G. Hooper (1945) Private James H. Amerson
Technician 5th Grade William R. Hutcheon (1945) Private Donald B. Arnold (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Anthony D. Idone (1945) Private Harry F. Arnold (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade James R. Jennings (1945) Private Roy W. Aronson
Technician 5th Grade Edward K. Johnson Private Joseph F. Aschenbrenner
Technician 5th Grade Frederick R. Johs (1945) Private James M. Atwood (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Kenneth E. Jones Private Joseph C. Baer
Technician 5th Grade Robert J. Kellison (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Julian W. Baer
Technician 5th Grade Raymond P. Kneiszel Private Theodore B. Baldwin (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade William Kovach Private James B. Barlar
Technician 5th Grade Lloyd P. Larscheid (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private A.C. Barlett (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Paul W. Light Private John Basile
Technician 5th Grade Thomas H. Lincic (1945) Private Murphy Bass
Technician 5th Grade Dale A. Lutgens (1945) Private Francis Bauer (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Frederick Marston (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Gregory L. Becerril (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Joseph R. Martin (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Howard C. Bemis
Technician 5th Grade Anton J. Matousek (1945) Private Horatio R. Berry (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Michael Mazzula (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Robert C. Bethel
Technician 5th Grade John C. Michels (transferred to 48th Fld Hosp late 1945) Private Lyle G. Beyers (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Hilmer R. Mielke Private Angelo Boglino (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Bailey R. Moore Private John Brien
Technician 5th Grade Samuel Nechin (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Harold C. Brooks (1945)
Technician 5th Grade James C. O’Brien (1945) Private Lawrence E. Brown (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade James J. O’Connor Private Robert A. Brown (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Olaf E. Paiu Private Cecil E. Buchanan
Picture illustrating unidentified personnel in front of their Quonset hut at Stowell Park, England.

Picture illustrating unidentified personnel in front of their Quonset hut at Stowell Park, England.

Technician 5th Grade Johnnie C. Parker (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Otto Bucholz (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade David Peele Private William A. Bundy (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Louis L. Permut (1945) Private John C. Buynak (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Victor G. Peterson Private Ross C. Byrd (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Jesse L. Pitts Private John M. Cabe
Technician 5th Grade Edward A. Plankers (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private William P. Cahill Jr.
Technician 5th Grade Waylon T. Pleasant (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Ottis O. Cain (1945)
Technician 5th Grade David Poole (1945) Private Charles S. N. Calma
Technician 5th Grade Stanley S. Powell Private Hershel R. Cameron (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Jesus R. Ramirez Private James M. Campbell (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Wesley K. Salisbury Private Nathan Canis
Technician 5th Grade William R. Sayre (1945) Private Nicholas E. Carlough
Technician 5th Grade Frank J. Scheuchenzuber (1945) Private William A. Carpenter (1945)
Technician 5th Grade Edgar E. Sear (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Elmer L. Carruth (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Daniel E. Simpson (1945) Private James H. Caskey (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Richard J. Sindelar (1945) Private James L. Cassell (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Woodward Sullivan Private Russell P. Cates (returned to ZI for emergency measures)
Technician 5th Grade George O. Sundseth Private Dillard Chambers (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade Quentin C. Unruh Private William T. Chambers
Technician 5th Grade Charles T. Vanlandingham Private Irving Chatoff (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Technician 5th Grade George P. Zannis (1945) Private Nicolas Christou (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Robert P. Abner (1945) Private Wade Clark (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Anthony Accurso (1945) Private Allen H. Cole (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class William F. Albrecht (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Edward Cooper (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Ruben Anaya (1945) Private James F. Courtney (1945)
Private First Class Oice Anderson (1945) Private Stanley J. Czarnecki (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class George T. Bailey (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Vito D’Angelico (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Kenneth L. Banks (1945) Private Robert E. Davis
Private First Class Ernest S. Barash (1945) Private Lester R. Deason (1945)
Private First Class William Barfield (1945) Private José G. De la Cruz (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Another picture taken during bivouac, either in England or somewhere in France.

Another picture taken during bivouac, either in England or somewhere in France.

Private First Class Herbert D. Betters Private Anthony E. Delagardelle (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Angelo Bianco (1945) Private Raymond S. De Leon (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Jack W. Biedel (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Salvatore J. De Sipio (1945)
Private First Class Hal E. Bradley Private Trindall E. DeLong
Private First Class Joe Brewer (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Louis P. DiVirgilio (1945)
Private First Class Henry E. Brookshire Private Mario A. DiLaura (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Robert L. Brown Private John R. Diment, Jr.
Private First Class Roger G. Burnette Private Joe T. Dixon (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Sam Canter (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private John F. Donnelly (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Leonard H. Carmichael Private Zigmund J. Dziedziak (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Homer W. Carney Private Zack Eates (1945)
Private First Class James H. Causey Private Antonio J. Esquibel (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Otto C. Chandler (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Edward Falba (1945)
Private First Class Philip C. Clark Private Jesse L. Falling (1945)
Private First Class John R. Cline Private William S. Farrell (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Private First Class Aubrey F. Collum Private Ernest C. Ferrell
Private First Class Stuart L. Compton (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Guillermo Fierro
Private First Class Lee N. Costner Private Oliver D. Finuff
Private First Class Hughe L. Coyhis (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Donald W. Fischel
Private First Class Dennum F. Crandall Private Irwin L. Foutz
Private First Class Millard Crawford Private Roy D. Fox
Private First Class James A. Cronin (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Nicholas G. Freidig (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Larkin J. Daniel (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Corley C. Fry (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Private First Class William G. Daniels (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Thomas V. Gaimari
Private First Class Joseph W. Davis (1945) Private John S. Garris, Jr. (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Ernest J. Davies Private Anthony O. Gerlach (transferred to 48th Fld Hosp late 1945)
Private First Class Jack C. Dersham (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Leonard L. Giles
Private First Class Robert A. Dexter (1945) George H. Gisi (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Clarence V. Dixon Private Clifford W. Glascock (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Walter A. Dolan Private Charles E. Glover
Private First Class Marion H. Edwards Private Glen H. Goer (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class George L. Erno (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Elias M. Gonzales
Private First Class Joseph R. Fantone Private Irwin F. Goodwin (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Stanley F. Flynn Private Wesley J. Graham (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Lloyd L. Former Private Otto E. Guenther
Private First Class John P. Fortner Private Robert W. Gustafson (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Arthur W. Frobel Private Paul L. Haeffner
Private First Class Francisco Galvan (1945) Private Joseph S. Hakin (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Private First Class William R. Gasque (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Clyde L. Hamilton
Private First Class Auckland D. Geddes (1945) Private Roy E. Hargis (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class John C. George Private Robert L. Harrison (1945)
Private First Class Norman W. Giere (1945) Private William C. Harrell
Private First Class Charles P. Ginn (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Lester S. Hartsfield (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Isidore Golden (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Millard D. Harvey (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class William J. Golueke Private Lester R. Hayes, Jr.
Private First Class Morton Gordon (1945) Private Anthony Hedepak (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class George T. Grant Private Richard H. Hendricks
Private First Class Melbon Greene Private Wendle L. Hendrix (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class George E. Guldner (1945) Private William H. Henson
Private First Class Kawrence Gusina (1945) Private Isaac M. Hidary (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Arthur J. Hamelin (1945) Private Charles L. Hinton
Private First Class Robert C. Harner (1945) Private Henry F. Hohfeld (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Francis G. Hart Private Pablo M. Moreno
Private First Class Bernard H. Hartel (1945) Private Eugene A. Moseley (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Donald E. Hauze (1945) Private Lloyd J. Mueller
Private First Class Anthony A. Haynie Private Harold S. Nanney
Private First Class Glennon G. Henke Private Harold L. Nash (1945)
Private First Class Arnold Hensley (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945) Private Anthony Nedopak (1945)
Private First Class George A. Henson (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945) Private Carlie T. Norden (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Thomas J. Hillhouse (1945) Private Charles E. Norton (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Less R. Hinds (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Stanley Norton
Private First Class Marvin G. Hoffman (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private John L. Novack
Private First Class Herbert B. Hood (1945) Private Archie H. Oakley (transferrede to 48th Fld Hosp late 1945)
Private First Class Danny N. Horne (1945) Private Roger A. Olson
Private First Class Paul E. Jones Private Sheldon L. Ourso
Private First Class Stanley J. Kapps (1945) Private Henry Pace (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Nicholas G. Katselis Private John Pagliarini (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class George M. Kelly (transferred to 48th Fld Hosp late 1945) Private Charles H. Palmer
Private First Class John F. Kijowski (1945) Private James T. Parker (1945)
Private First Class Stonewall J. Kirby Private Lewis L. Parris
Private First Class Joseph Kopek (1945) Private Bernard S. Perez
Private First Class Stanislaus J. Kubiak (1945) Private Glen W. Phillips (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class William H. Lacina Private Harold D. Phillips (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class James A. Lagasse, Jr. (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Wilbur E. Phillips (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Carl Leitsch (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Walter J. Piegalski, Jr. (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Daniel C. Lentz (1945) Private Herbert L. Poling
Private First Class Ernest D. Leonard (1945) Private Andrew Polizzi
Private First Class Elmer Lewis Private Thomas J. Pollock
Private First Class Anthony Luizzi Private Oscar L. Poole (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class William J. Lutz Private Mervin A. Prather (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class David J. MacLuckey Private José S. Preciade
Private First Class Frank L. Marasco Private Everett I. Proffer (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Samuel A. Marcojohn Private George T. Quirk
Private First Class Dewey W. Maron (1945) Private Arlie M. Ramage (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Benjamin F. Martin Private Hughie E. Rasner (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Shade V. McCotter Private Roscoe Raynor (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class John S. McMurray Private Hugh L. Ree (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Gerald Meade (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Wallace E. Reed (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Private First Class Robert E. Meisenhiemer (1945) Private Norbert C. Reiffenberger (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Roy M. Metcalf Private Patrick A. Rierdan (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Eugene F. Miller Private Angelo Roglino (1945)
Private First Class Floyd H. Miller Private Anthony J. Rose (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Elmer T. Mizell (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Clarence W. Royce (1945)
Private First Class Leroy Mobley Private Louis Rubenstein
Private First Class James P. Mohan Private Reamus L. Ruby (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Adolph Monarco Private Abel D. Ruiz
Private First Class Sylvester R. Mora (1945) Private Pete D. Ryan (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945)
Private First Class Chester Mouzer (1945) Private Juan Saavedra (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class John J. Mozzicato (1945) Private Benjamin Sachs (1945)
Private First Class Benjamin Murphy (1945) Private Secundio Sales (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Hugh A. Murphy (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private August W. Scheel (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class John L. Nass (1945) Private Robert C. Scott
Private First Class Roberet E. Neumann (1945) Private Leslie E. Shanks (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Jacob Newman (1945) Private Joseph Shaw
Private First Class Malvern E. Norwood Private Mark L. Shepard (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Robert J. Pagels Private Robert J. Shrider (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Paul F. Phelps Private Joseph Sicuranza (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Arlo E. Pierce, Jr. Private Earl E. Smith
Private First Class Jacques W. Pierce (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Robert T. Smith
Private First Class Joe F. Pillitary Private Roger P. Sowder (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class John Plevinski (1945) Private Robert J. Sowell (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Group picture of 58th General Hospital personnel taken at Lérouville, France.

Group picture of 58th General Hospital personnel taken at Lérouville, France.

Private First Class Lewis H. Pollock Private Mindle L. Spencer
Private First Class John V. Poplin (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Karl S. Sorenson
Private First Class Edmund J. Prokop Private Basile Spitale (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Edwin A. Rabke Private Leo Stanger (1945)
Private First Class Edward Raddatz (1945) Private William A. Steen (1945)
Private First Class Jimmie L. Reagon Private Robert M. Stokes (1945)
Private First Class Russell A. Reale Private Thomas G. Stone
Private First Class Cecil A. Reeves (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private George W. Sykes
Private First Class Earl W. Rhoads (1945) Private Edward Tanner (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Shirley Rhoads (1945) Private Vito A. Tatone (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Glenn C. Rice Private Rienzo Y. Thomas (transferred to other uinit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Carl B. Ridson (1945) Private George A. Thompson (returned to ZI for emergency reasons)
Private First Class James B. Riehl Private Lester C. Thornton (1945)
Private First Class Charles H. Roberts Private Edward W. Tristano
Private First Class Fred A. Robrecht (evacuated to ZI as of August 1945) Private Kenneth L. Turner (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Jesse R. Sackett Private John W. Tuttle (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Charles T. Savko (1945) Private Jack A. Tyler
Private First Class Charles H. Scherer Private Robert Utter
Private First Class Howard J. Schmitt Jr. (1945) Private John H. Verbruggen (returned to ZI for emergency reasons)
Private First Class Herman F. Schultz (1945) Private Jack R. Vigiano (1945)
Private First Class Frank J. Schuster (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Everett L. Vinson
Private First Class Clayton D. Scott Private John Volpendesta (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class John M. Scott (1945) Private Walter H. VonDoloski
Private First Class Clarence Shaunnessey (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private George F. Waldo (1945)
Private First Class Sanford H. Shurman Private Robert W. Wallace
Private First Class Joseph Shust Private William R. Warren (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Robert T. Smith Private James V. Watkins
Private First Class Sam D. Smith Jr. (1945) Private Raymond R. Watts, Jr.
Private First Class William H. Smith (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private John J. Weber
Private First Class Ralph Snyder (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Robert L. Weed
Private First Class Carl S. Sorenson (1945) Private Leland E. Welling
Private First Class Roy B. Stafford (transferred to other unit as of August 1945) Private Benjamin T. Wells (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Jesse R. Steinway Private Robert H. Whitehead (1945)
Private First Class Edward E. Stout Private Willis W. Williams (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class William L. Sugg Private Richard D. Wilkerson
Private First Class John W. Sullivan Private Anraham Winer (1945)
Private First Class Robert J. Swick (1945) Private Lyle F. Wright, Jr. (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Hedrick T. Sykes Private Earl E. Yeary
Private First Class Warren E. Tedrow (1945) Private Howard L. York (transferred to other unit as of August 1945)
Private First Class Ray Thomas (1945) Private George Young
Private First Class Raymond J. Thurman (1945) Private Martin L. Yourell Jr. (1945)
Picture of Quentin C. Unruh, taken during Christmas 2014.

Picture of Quentin C. Unruh, taken during Christmas 2014.


The MRC Staff are particularly indebted to Technician 4th Grade Quentin C. Unruh (ASN:39848219), Surgical Technician, who served with the 58th General Hospital in the European Theater of Operations, and his proud son Cliff Unruh, for providing them with personal reminiscences, historical data, and a large number of photographs relating to the 58th General Hospital in World War Two. Debbie Belt, daughter of Quentin, further kindly supplied them with a copy of the book “The History of the 58th General Hospital” published shortly after WWII. Sincere thanks to all for their assistance.

This page was printed from the WW2 US Medical Research Centre on 19th January 2019 at 02:39.
Read more: https://www.med-dept.com/veterans-testimonies/veterans-testimony-quentin-c-unruh/